CHRISTIAN church is for Christians obliviously by the name please Christians only please as this is a place for christian to gather together , thanks
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jt4qYZqRvpU
    Ahmed Deedat and the Deity of Christ (David and Anthony LIVE, 8:00pm ET)
    Tonight at 8:00pm (Eastern Time), David Wood and Anthony Rogers will go through some of Ahmed Deedat's objections to the deity of Christ.
    YouTube
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  • February 16 PM

    "Thy good Spirit."
    — Nehemiah 9:20

    Common, too common is the sin of forgetting the Holy Spirit. This is folly and ingratitude. He deserves well at our hands, for He is good, supremely good. As God, He is good essentially. He shares in the threefold ascription of Holy, holy, holy, which ascends to the Triune Jehovah. Unmixed purity and truth, and grace is He. He is good benevolently, tenderly bearing with our waywardness, striving with our rebellious wills; quickening us from our death in sin, and then training us for the skies as a loving nurse fosters her child. How generous, forgiving, and tender is this patient Spirit of God. He is good operatively. All His works are good in the most eminent degree: He suggests good thoughts, prompts good actions, reveals good truths, applies good promises, assists in good attainments, and leads to good results. There is no spiritual good in all the world of which He is not the author and sustainer, and heaven itself will owe the perfect character of its redeemed inhabitants to His work. He is good officially; whether as Comforter, Instructor, Guide, Sanctifier, Quickener, or Intercessor, He fulfils His office well, and each work is fraught with the highest good to the church of God. They who yield to His influences become good, they who obey His impulses do good, they who live under His power receive good. Let us then act towards so good a person according to the dictates of gratitude. Let us revere His person, and adore Him as God over all, blessed for ever; let us own His power, and our need of Him by waiting upon Him in all our holy enterprises; let us hourly seek His aid, and never grieve Him; and let us speak to His praise whenever occasion occurs. The church will never prosper until more reverently it believes in the Holy Ghost. He is so good and kind, that it is sad indeed that He should be grieved by slights and negligences.
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  • Lecture 12, The Millennium:

    The book of Revelation describes a time period in the last days called the Millennium. In fact, it says that the Millennium is a period of one-thousand years. But when did the last days begin? Are we still waiting for the last days or are we in them now? Is the Millennium a future expectation for the church or are we currently in it? In this message, Dr. Sproul explains the different theological perspectives in the church that are known by their teaching about “The Millennium.”

    https://www.ligonier.org/learn/series/last_days_ac...?
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  • 365 Days With Calvin

    16 FEBRUARY

    Deliverance from Fear

    I sought the LORD, and he heard me, and delivered me from all my fears. Psalm 34:4
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 2 Timothy 4:9–22


    David did not look upon his dangers with a calm and untroubled mind, as if at a distance and from some elevated position. He was grievously tormented with innumerable cares and justly spoke of his fear and terror. By saying “fears,” he reveals he was greatly terrified, not by one, but by a variety of distracting troubles.
    On one hand, David saw a cruel death awaiting him, while on the other, he may have been filled with the fear that Achish would send him to Saul, since the ungodly are likely to gratify themselves by making sport of the children of God. David had already been betrayed once and might well have concluded that even if he escaped, the hired assassins of Saul might be laying in wait for him on all sides. The hatred Achish had against David for the death of Goliath and the destruction of his army might also have given David reason to fear. Achish might wreak his vengeance upon David. Furthermore, he was so cruel that he likely would not be appeased by subjecting David to an easy death.
    We ought to note what David says here about seeking the Lord, who delivered me from all my fears, so that if at any time we are terrified because of the dangers that surround us, we might not be prevented by a lack of courage from calling upon God. Even David, who is known to have surpassed others in heroism and bravery, did not have a heart of iron to repel all fears and alarms but was sometimes greatly disquieted and smitten with fear.

    FOR MEDITATION: What fears are you battling today? How can you cast them upon God and leave them with him without becoming indifferent about them?


    Calvin, J., & Beeke, J. R. (2008). 365 Days with Calvin (p. 65). Leominster; Grand Rapids, MI: Day One Publications; Reformation Heritage Books.
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  • Spurgeon

    Morning, February 16

    “I have learned, in whatever state I am, therewith to be content.”
    —Philippians 4:11

    These words show us that contentment is not a natural propensity of man. “Ill weeds grow apace.” Covetousness, discontent, and murmuring are as natural to man as thorns are to the soil. We need not sow thistles and brambles; they come up naturally enough, because they are indigenous to earth: and so, we need not teach men to complain; they complain fast enough without any education. But the precious things of the earth must be cultivated. If we would have wheat, we must plough and sow; if we want flowers, there must be the garden, and all the gardener’s care. Now, contentment is one of the flowers of heaven, and if we would have it, it must be cultivated; it will not grow in us by nature; it is the new nature alone that can produce it, and even then we must be specially careful and watchful that we maintain and cultivate the grace which God has sown in us. Paul says, “I have learned … to be content;” as much as to say, he did not know how at one time. It cost him some pains to attain to the mystery of that great truth. No doubt he sometimes thought he had learned, and then broke down. And when at last he had attained unto it, and could say, “I have learned in whatsoever state I am, therewith to be content,” he was an old, grey-headed man, upon the borders of the grave—a poor prisoner shut up in Nero’s dungeon at Rome. We might well be willing to endure Paul’s infirmities, and share the cold dungeon with him, if we too might by any means attain unto his good degree. Do not indulge the notion that you can be contented with learning, or learn without discipline. It is not a power that may be exercised naturally, but a science to be acquired gradually. We know this from experience. Brother, hush that murmur, natural though it be, and continue a diligent pupil in the College of Content.
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  • From Fox's Book of Martyrs

    Chapter VIII
    An Account of the Persecutions in Bohemia Under the Papacy

    Persecution of Zisca . . . continued

    Maximilian Hostialick was famed for his learning, piety, and humanity.

    When he first came on the scaffold, he seemed exceedingly terrified at the approach of death. The officer taking notice of his agitation, Hostialick said, "Ah! sir, now the sins of my youth crowd upon my mind, but I hope God will enlighten me, lest I sleep the sleep of death and lest mine enemies say we have prevailed." Soon after he said, "I hope my repentance is sincere, and will be accepted, in which case the blood of Christ will wash me from my crimes." He then told the officer he should repeat the Song of Simeon; at the conclusion of which the executioner might do his duty. He accordingly, said, "Lord, now lettest Thou Thy servant depart in peace, according to Thy word: For mine eyes have seen Thy salvation;" at which words his head was struck off at one blow.

    When John Kutnaur came to the place of execution, a Jesuit said to him, "Embrace the Roman Catholic faith, which alone can save and arm you against the terrors of death." To which he replied, "Your superstitious faith I abhor, it leads to perdition, and I wish for no other arms against the terrors of death than a good conscience." The Jesuit turned away, saying, sarcastically, "The Protestants are impenetrable rocks." "You are mistaken," said Kutnaur, "it is Christ that is the Rock, and we are firmly fixed upon Him."

    This person not being born independent, but having acquired a fortune by a mechanical employment, was ordered to be hanged. Just before he was turned off, he said, "I die, not for having committed any crime, but for following the dictates of my own conscience, and defending my country and religion."

    Simeon Sussickey was father-in-law to Kutnaur, and like him, was ordered to be executed on a gallows. He went cheerfully to death, and appeared impatient to be executed, saying, "Every moment delays me from entering into the Kingdom of Christ."

    Nathaniel Wodnianskey was hanged for having supported the Protestant cause, and the election of Frederic to the crown of Bohemia. At the gallows, the Jesuits did all in their power to induce him to renounce his faith. Finding their endeavors ineffectual, one of them said, "If you will not adjure your heresy, at least repent of your rebellion?" To which Wodnianskey replied, "You take away our lives under a pretended charge of rebellion; and, not content with that, seek to destroy our souls; glut yourselves with blood, and be satisfied; but tamper not with our consciences."

    Wodnianskey's own son then approached the gallows, and said to his father, "Sir, if life should be offered to you on condition of apostasy, I entreat you to remember Christ, and reject such pernicious overtures." To this the father replied, "It is very acceptable, my son, to be exhorted to constancy by you; but suspect me not; rather endeavor to confirm in their faith your brothers, sisters, and children, and teach them to imitate that constancy of which I shall leave them an example." He had so sooner concluded these words than he was turned off, receiving the crown of martyrdom with great fortitude.

    Wenceslaus Gisbitzkey, during his whole confinement, had great hopes of life given him, which made his friends fear for the safety of his soul. He, however, continued steadfast in his faith, prayed fervently at the gallows, and met his fate with singular resignation.

    Continued . . .
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  • Read the Bible in One Year

    Today's reading in the M'Cheyne Bible Reading Plan

    Genesis 48; Luke 1:39-80; Job 14; 1 Corinthians 2
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  • From Fox's Book of Martyrs

    Chapter VIII
    An Account of the Persecutions in Bohemia Under the Papacy

    Persecution of Zisca      . . . continued

    Maximilian Hostialick was famed for his learning, piety, and humanity.

    When he first came on the scaffold, he seemed exceedingly terrified at the approach of death. The officer taking notice of his agitation, Hostialick said, "Ah! sir, now the sins of my youth crowd upon my mind, but I hope God will enlighten me, lest I sleep the sleep of death and lest mine enemies say we have prevailed." Soon after he said, "I hope my repentance is sincere, and will be accepted, in which case the blood of Christ will wash me from my crimes." He then told the officer he should repeat the Song of Simeon; at the conclusion of which the executioner might do his duty. He accordingly, said, "Lord, now lettest Thou Thy servant depart in peace, according to Thy word: For mine eyes have seen Thy salvation;" at which words his head was struck off at one blow.

    When John Kutnaur came to the place of execution, a Jesuit said to him, "Embrace the Roman Catholic faith, which alone can save and arm you against the terrors of death." To which he replied, "Your superstitious faith I abhor, it leads to perdition, and I wish for no other arms against the terrors of death than a good conscience." The Jesuit turned away, saying, sarcastically, "The Protestants are impenetrable rocks." "You are mistaken," said Kutnaur, "it is Christ that is the Rock, and we are firmly fixed upon Him."

    This person not being born independent, but having acquired a fortune by a mechanical employment, was ordered to be hanged. Just before he was turned off, he said, "I die, not for having committed any crime, but for following the dictates of my own conscience, and defending my country and religion."

    Simeon Sussickey was father-in-law to Kutnaur, and like him, was ordered to be executed on a gallows. He went cheerfully to death, and appeared impatient to be executed, saying, "Every moment delays me from entering into the Kingdom of Christ."

    Nathaniel Wodnianskey was hanged for having supported the Protestant cause, and the election of Frederic to the crown of Bohemia. At the gallows, the Jesuits did all in their power to induce him to renounce his faith. Finding their endeavors ineffectual, one of them said, "If you will not adjure your heresy, at least repent of your rebellion?" To which Wodnianskey replied, "You take away our lives under a pretended charge of rebellion; and, not content with that, seek to destroy our souls; glut yourselves with blood, and be satisfied; but tamper not with our consciences."

    Wodnianskey's own son then approached the gallows, and said to his father, "Sir, if life should be offered to you on condition of apostasy, I entreat you to remember Christ, and reject such pernicious overtures." To this the father replied, "It is very acceptable, my son, to be exhorted to constancy by you; but suspect me not; rather endeavor to confirm in their faith your brothers, sisters, and children, and teach them to imitate that constancy of which I shall leave them an example." He had so sooner concluded these words than he was turned off, receiving the crown of martyrdom with great fortitude.

    Wenceslaus Gisbitzkey, during his whole confinement, had great hopes of life given him, which made his friends fear for the safety of his soul. He, however, continued steadfast in his faith, prayed fervently at the gallows, and met his fate with singular resignation.

    Continued . . .

     
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  • Read the Bible in One Year

    Today's reading in the M'Cheyne Bible Reading Plan

    Genesis 48; Luke 1:39-80; Job 14; 1 Corinthians 2
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  • Lecture 11, The Rapture:

    What is the Rapture? Christians all agree that Jesus will return to take His church out of this fallen world, but there is disagreement as to how He will do it. Will Jesus secretly take His people out of this world only to return again later for the Resurrection? Dr. Sproul considers this question as he continues the study of The Last Days According to Jesus, with this message entitled “The Rapture.”

    https://www.ligonier.org/learn/series/last_days_ac...?
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  • From Calvin's Institutes

    CHAPTER XIII

    IN SCRIPTURE, FROM THE CREATION ONWARD, WE ARE TAUGHT ONE ESSENCE OF GOD, WHICH CONTAINS THREE PERSON

    24 . . . continued

    It is certain that those whom the Father is addressing were uncreated; but there is nothing uncreated except God himself, and he is one. Now therefore unless they grant that the power of creating was common to the Father, the Son, and the Spirit, common also the authority to command, it will follow that God did not speak thus within himself, but addressed other outside artificers. Finally, one passage easily rids us at once of two of their objections. For what Christ himself declared, that “God is Spirit” [John 4:24], would not be appropriately restricted to the Father alone, as if the Word were not himself of a spiritual nature. But if the name “Spirit” fits the Son equally with the Father, I conclude that the Son is to be comprehended under the unparticularized name “God.” Nevertheless he adds immediately after that no one else but those who worship the Father in spirit and in truth prove themselves to be worshipers of the Father [John 4:23]. From this follows the other point: since Christ exercises the office of Teacher under the Head [the Father], he ascribes to the Father the name of God, not to abolish his own deity, but to raise us up to it by degrees.

    Continued . . .


    Calvin, J. (2011). Institutes of the Christian Religion & 2. (J. T. McNeill, Ed., F. L. Battles, Trans.) (Vol. 1, pp. 153–154). Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press.
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  • Spurgeon

    Morning, February 15

    “To him be glory both now and forever.”
    —2 Peter 3:18

    Heaven will be full of the ceaseless praises of Jesus. Eternity! thine unnumbered years shall speed their everlasting course, but forever and for ever, “to him be glory.” Is he not a “Priest for ever after the order of Melchizedek”? “To him be glory.” Is he not king for ever?—King of kings and Lord of lords, the everlasting Father? “To him be glory for ever.” Never shall his praises cease. That which was bought with blood deserves to last while immortality endures. The glory of the cross must never be eclipsed; the lustre of the grave and of the resurrection must never be dimmed. O Jesus! thou shalt be praised for ever. Long as immortal spirits live—long as the Father’s throne endures—for ever, for ever, unto thee shall be glory. Believer, you are anticipating the time when you shall join the saints above in ascribing all glory to Jesus; but are you glorifying him now? The apostle’s words are, “To him be glory both now and for ever.” Will you not this day make it your prayer? “Lord, help me to glorify thee; I am poor, help me to glorify thee by contentment; I am sick, help me to give thee honour by patience; I have talents, help me to extol thee by spending them for thee; I have time, Lord, help me to redeem it, that I may serve thee; I have a heart to feel, Lord, let that heart feel no love but thine, and glow with no flame but affection for thee; I have a head to think, Lord, help me to think of thee and for thee; thou hast put me in this world for something, Lord, show me what that is, and help me to work out my life-purpose: I cannot do much, but as the widow put in her two mites, which were all her living, so, Lord, I cast my time and eternity too into thy treasury; I am all thine; take me, and enable me to glorify thee now, in all that I say, in all that I do, and with all that I have.”
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  • 365 Days With Calvin

    15 FEBRUARY

    Releasing Fear to God

    Into thine hand I commit my spirit: thou hast redeemed me, O LORD God of truth. Psalm 31:5
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Luke 23:44–47


    Though many things may distress us all, scarcely one person of a hundred wisely commits his life into God’s hand. Multitudes live from day to day as merry and careless as if they were in a quiet nest, free from all disturbances. But when they encounter something that truly terrifies them, they are ready to die in anguish. They do not betake themselves to God, either because they deceive themselves with vain delusions, flattering themselves that all will yet be well, or because they are so stricken with dread and stupefied with amazement that they have no desire for God’s fatherly care.
    As various tempests of grief disturb us and even sometimes throw us down or drag us from the direct path of duty, or at least remove us from our post, the only remedy for setting our fears to rest is to consider that God, who is the author of our life, is also our preserver. Trusting in him is the only way to lighten our burdens and preserve us from being swallowed up by excessive sorrow.
    Seeing, therefore, that God condescends to take care of our lives and to support us, let us learn always to flee to this asylum. The more that we are exposed to danger, the more we should carefully meditate upon this.
    This confidence will help us discharge our duty with alacrity as well as constantly and fearlessly struggle onward to the end of our course. How then can so many people be slothful and indifferent, and others so perfidiously forsake their duty? How can they be so overwhelmed with anxiety and terrified of dangers and inconveniences that they leave no room for the operation of the providence of God?

    FOR MEDITATION: Few comforts are as great as that which comes from committing one’s life to God’s hand. Regardless of what storms arise, peace is to be found in God. What do you most fear? Consider what comfort you may find if you release your fear to God.


    Calvin, J., & Beeke, J. R. (2008). 365 Days with Calvin (p. 64). Leominster; Grand Rapids, MI: Day One Publications; Reformation Heritage Books.
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  • Alexander Skobeleff also this Islam thing and people facinsation with it i am certain of that its going to enthrall the whole world in the Israel and Palestine conflict then come the judgement of Matthew 23 againtst israel (third palestian intifada ) then the death mourning and famine then the angel throws a millstone at city the Hezbollah Israel war 60000 - 100000 missiles rain down on Israel smashing rev 18 then the revelation 9 , 16 sixth trumpet and vial as ancient babylon was invaded by diverting the water of euphrates lowering the water level and march a army through it into the city hezbollah hassan nasrallah went before his support on 2011 and announced there plan to invade the galliee now in the rev 16 vial it say out of mouth of dragon ( devil ) beast and the false prophet gathering together the kings of the earth ( the seven kings of the western roman empire ( USA AND EU )) in to the place in hebrew tongue armageddon . so hezbollah invasion of israel draws te USA AND EU into the battle of armageddon in israel fulfilling daniel 2 smite the foot of statue the fourth kingdom conquered by the fifth . anyway if you want to know about hezbollah 60 to 100 thousand missiles https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2sr4WVQNt-U&list=PLOj1t1YOjdmxxCeTFrvYXWETs2TRHpORx&index=8 , hezbollah plan to invade the galliee the sixth trumpet and vial https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hYqAFf3hzvc&list=PLOj1t1YOjdmxxCeTFrvYXWETs2TRHpORx&index=9 anyway if you want to know about why i think 01 02 2018 was start of great tribulation the lunar eclipse the pat robinson testomony about puting threat about nuclear war on month lator a video is included about russia nuclear arsenal a video about the cold war russia and the west being returned one year after the lunar eclipse and the threat of nuclear war after decades of this threat desapearing reemerging and last in the video is interview talking about how we are in danger time then the 1950 and 60 right now we are more endanger https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cZgFUcNkMkk&list=PLOj1t1YOjdmxxCeTFrvYXWETs2TRHpORx&index=10 . also please my 95 thesis of revelation https://archive.org/details/EXPLAINDANIELANDREVELATIONUPDATE16 i would really appreciate if you read my thesis if any thing you look at here please read the thesis . anyway GOD BLESS YOU
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  • the soon coming war between hezbollah and israel
    Revelation 18:21-24 King James Version (KJV)

    21 And a mighty angel took up a stone like a great millstone, and cast it into the sea, saying, Thus with violence shall that great city Babylon be thrown down, and shall be found no more at all.

    22 And the voice of harpers, and musicians, and of pipers, and trumpeters, shall be heard no more at all in thee; and no craftsman, of whatsoever craft he be, shall be found any more in thee; and the sound of a millstone shall be heard no more at all in thee;

    23 And the light of a candle shall shine no more at all in thee; and the voice of the bridegroom and of the bride shall be heard no more at all in thee: for thy merchants were the great men of the earth; for by thy sorceries were all nations deceived.

    24 And in her was found the blood of prophets, and of saints, and of all that were slain upon the earth.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCYjLrpnsMg
    Syrian War Report – Feb. 11-13, 2019: New Israel Strikes And 'Secret Missile Factory' In Tartus
    If you’re able, and if you like our content and approach, please support the project. Our work wouldn’t be possible without your help: PayPal: southfront@lis...
    YouTube
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  • From Fox's Book of Martyrs

    Chapter VIII
    An Account of the Persecutions in Bohemia Under the Papacy

    Persecution of Zisca      . . . continued

    Maximilian Hostialick was famed for his learning, piety, and humanity.

    When he first came on the scaffold, he seemed exceedingly terrified at the approach of death. The officer taking notice of his agitation, Hostialick said, "Ah! sir, now the sins of my youth crowd upon my mind, but I hope God will enlighten me, lest I sleep the sleep of death and lest mine enemies say we have prevailed." Soon after he said, "I hope my repentance is sincere, and will be accepted, in which case the blood of Christ will wash me from my crimes." He then told the officer he should repeat the Song of Simeon; at the conclusion of which the executioner might do his duty. He accordingly, said, "Lord, now lettest Thou Thy servant depart in peace, according to Thy word: For mine eyes have seen Thy salvation;" at which words his head was struck off at one blow.

    When John Kutnaur came to the place of execution, a Jesuit said to him, "Embrace the Roman Catholic faith, which alone can save and arm you against the terrors of death." To which he replied, "Your superstitious faith I abhor, it leads to perdition, and I wish for no other arms against the terrors of death than a good conscience." The Jesuit turned away, saying, sarcastically, "The Protestants are impenetrable rocks." "You are mistaken," said Kutnaur, "it is Christ that is the Rock, and we are firmly fixed upon Him."

    This person not being born independent, but having acquired a fortune by a mechanical employment, was ordered to be hanged. Just before he was turned off, he said, "I die, not for having committed any crime, but for following the dictates of my own conscience, and defending my country and religion."

    Simeon Sussickey was father-in-law to Kutnaur, and like him, was ordered to be executed on a gallows. He went cheerfully to death, and appeared impatient to be executed, saying, "Every moment delays me from entering into the Kingdom of Christ."

    Nathaniel Wodnianskey was hanged for having supported the Protestant cause, and the election of Frederic to the crown of Bohemia. At the gallows, the Jesuits did all in their power to induce him to renounce his faith. Finding their endeavors ineffectual, one of them said, "If you will not adjure your heresy, at least repent of your rebellion?" To which Wodnianskey replied, "You take away our lives under a pretended charge of rebellion; and, not content with that, seek to destroy our souls; glut yourselves with blood, and be satisfied; but tamper not with our consciences."

    Wodnianskey's own son then approached the gallows, and said to his father, "Sir, if life should be offered to you on condition of apostasy, I entreat you to remember Christ, and reject such pernicious overtures." To this the father replied, "It is very acceptable, my son, to be exhorted to constancy by you; but suspect me not; rather endeavor to confirm in their faith your brothers, sisters, and children, and teach them to imitate that constancy of which I shall leave them an example." He had so sooner concluded these words than he was turned off, receiving the crown of martyrdom with great fortitude.

    Winceslaus Gisbitzkey, during his whole confinement, had great hopes of life given him, which made his friends fear for the safety of his soul. He, however, continued steadfast in his faith, prayed fervently at the gallows, and met his fate with singular resignation.
    Continued . . .
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  • Read the Bible in One Year

    Today's reading in the M'Cheyne Bible Reading Plan

    Genesis 47; Luke 1:1–38; Job 13; 1 Corinthians 1  
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  • 365 Days With Calvin

    14 FEBRUARY

    Whom Shall I Fear?

    The LORD is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? the LORD is the strength of my life; of whom shall I be afraid? Psalm 27:1
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Romans 8:31–39


    All our fears arise from this source: we are too anxious about our life and fail to acknowledge that God is our preserver. We can have no tranquility until we are persuaded that our life is sufficiently protected by God’s omnipotent power.
    Let us learn to value God’s power to protect us so that all our fears are put to flight. Because of the infirmity of the flesh, the minds of the faithful cannot at all times be entirely devoid of fear. But let us immediately recover courage, and, from the high tower of our confidence, look down upon all our dangers with contempt. Those who have never tasted the grace of God tremble because they refuse to rely on him. They imagine that he is often incensed against them or at least far removed from them. But with the promises of God before our eyes and the grace that they offer, our unbelief grievously wrongs God if we do not with unshrinking courage boldly set him against all our enemies.
    God kindly allures us to himself and assures us that he will take care of our safety. When we embrace his promises and believe him to be faithful, we should also highly extol his power so that our hearts are ravished with admiration of himself. We must mark well this comparison: what are all creatures to God, and how does he protect them? Moreover, we must further extend this confidence to banish all fears from our consciences. Like Paul, we can then speak of our eternal salvation by boldly exclaiming, “If God be for us, who can be against us?” (Rom. 8:31).

    FOR MEDITATION: When an affliction or danger provokes anxious fear in us, what does that say about our trust in God? How can we daily trust in God as our preserver so that fears do not overwhelm us?


    Calvin, J., & Beeke, J. R. (2008). 365 Days with Calvin (p. 63). Leominster; Grand Rapids, MI: Day One Publications; Reformation Heritage Books.

     
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  • Spurgeon

    Morning, February 14 

    “And his allowance was a continual allowance given him of the king, a daily rate for every day, all the days of his life.”
    —2 Kings 25:30

    Jehoiachin was not sent away from the king’s palace with a store to last him for months, but his provision was given him as a daily pension. Herein he well pictures the happy position of all the Lord’s people. A daily portion is all that a man really wants. We do not need tomorrow’s supplies; that day has not yet dawned, and its wants are as yet unborn. The thirst which we may suffer in the month of June does not need to be quenched in February, for we do not feel it yet; if we have enough for each day as the days arrive we shall never know want. Sufficient for the day is all that we can enjoy. We cannot eat or drink or wear more than the day’s supply of food and raiment; the surplus gives us the care of storing it, and the anxiety of watching against a thief. One staff aids a traveller, but a bundle of staves is a heavy burden. Enough is not only as good as a feast, but is all that the greatest glutton can truly enjoy. This is all that we should expect; a craving for more than this is ungrateful. When our Father does not give us more, we should be content with his daily allowance. Jehoiachin’s case is ours, we have a sure portion, a portion given us of the king, a gracious portion, and a perpetual portion. Here is surely ground for thankfulness.

    Beloved Christian reader, in matters of grace you need a daily supply. You have no store of strength. Day by day must you seek help from above. It is a very sweet assurance that a daily portion is provided for you. In the word, through the ministry, by meditation, in prayer, and waiting upon God you shall receive renewed strength. In Jesus all needful things are laid up for you. Then enjoy your continual allowance. Never go hungry while the daily bread of grace is on the table of mercy.
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  • Spurgeon
    Evening, February 13

    “There is therefore now no condemnation.”
    —Romans 8:1

    Come, my soul, think thou of this. Believing in Jesus, thou art actually and effectually cleared from guilt; thou art led out of thy prison. Thou art no more in fetters as a bond-slave; thou art delivered now from the bondage of the law; thou art freed from sin, and canst walk at large as a freeman, thy Saviour’s blood has procured thy full discharge. Thou hast a right now to approach thy Father’s throne. No flames of vengeance are there to scare thee now; no fiery sword; justice cannot smite the innocent. Thy disabilities are taken away: thou wast once unable to see thy Father’s face: thou canst see it now. Thou couldst not speak with him: but now thou hast access with boldness. Once there was a fear of hell upon thee; but thou hast no fear of it now, for how can there be punishment for the guiltless? He who believeth is not condemned, and cannot be punished. And more than all, the privileges thou mightst have enjoyed, if thou hadst never sinned, are thine now that thou art justified. All the blessings which thou wouldst have had if thou hadst kept the law, and more, are thine, because Christ has kept it for thee. All the love and the acceptance which perfect obedience could have obtained of God, belong to thee, because Christ was perfectly obedient on thy behalf, and hath imputed all his merits to thy account, that thou mightst be exceeding rich through him, who for thy sake became exceeding poor. Oh! how great the debt of love and gratitude thou owest to thy Saviour!

    “A debtor to mercy alone,
    Of covenant mercy I sing;
    Nor fear with thy righteousness on,
    My person and offerings to bring:
    The terrors of law and of God,
    With me can have nothing to do;
    My Saviour’s obedience and blood
    Hide all my transgressions from view.”


    Spurgeon, C. H. (1896). Morning and evening: Daily readings. London: Passmore & Alabaster.
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