How Media Wrongly Portrays Opioid Addiction - 68,000 Dead Last Year.
For the most part, Nancy B. is just a regular person.

She’s 29. She lives on Staten Island.
She has a boyfriend, a child and a job.
She’s also a former drug user in recovery who has administered naloxone (sold under the brand name Narcan), a medication that reverses opioid overdose, “quite a few times.”

“It saves lives,” she told Observer.

“Anything I can do to make sure that’s a known fact, and make it available to everyone, I will do.”

Nancy isn’t alone in her desire to see naloxone made more prevalent. In New York and other cities across the country, there are programs in place to make sure regular, everyday citizens have access to naloxone.

Not only could you attend one of the free certification trainings or go to a pharmacy and start carrying the life-saving medication, but a growing number of people, like Nancy and some community organizers and leaders, argue you should.

Whether you’re close to someone who uses drugs or not, you could administer naloxone, too, and as rates of fatal overdoses rise, you might be closer to someone at risk than you realize.

In fact, you could be at risk yourself:

Fentanyl, an opioid 30 to 50 times more powerful than heroin, has been found in cocaine and other non-opioid street drugs in New York City, which means even occasional users who choose club drugs over pills or heroin could still experience an opiate overdose.
#OpioidsKill #Fentanyl50XWorseThanHeroin #TheDamageReport #JohnIadarola #TYTNetwork #LindseyEllefson
https://youtu.be/QUWG-16RrB0
The Damage Report 9/7/19
How Media Wrongly Portrays Opioid Addiction - 68,000 Dead Last Year. For the most part, Nancy B. is just a regular person. She’s 29. She lives on Staten Island. She has a boyfriend, a child and a job. She’s also a former drug user in recovery who has administered naloxone (sold under the brand name Narcan), a medication that reverses opioid overdose, “quite a few times.” “It saves lives,” she told Observer. “Anything I can do to make sure that’s a known fact, and make it available to everyone, I will do.” Nancy isn’t alone in her desire to see naloxone made more prevalent. In New York and other cities across the country, there are programs in place to make sure regular, everyday citizens have access to naloxone. Not only could you attend one of the free certification trainings or go to a pharmacy and start carrying the life-saving medication, but a growing number of people, like Nancy and some community organizers and leaders, argue you should. Whether you’re close to someone who uses drugs or not, you could administer naloxone, too, and as rates of fatal overdoses rise, you might be closer to someone at risk than you realize. In fact, you could be at risk yourself: Fentanyl, an opioid 30 to 50 times more powerful than heroin, has been found in cocaine and other non-opioid street drugs in New York City, which means even occasional users who choose club drugs over pills or heroin could still experience an opiate overdose. #OpioidsKill #Fentanyl50XWorseThanHeroin #TheDamageReport #JohnIadarola #TYTNetwork #LindseyEllefson https://youtu.be/QUWG-16RrB0 The Damage Report 9/7/19
How Media Wrongly Portrays Opioid Addiction
US media wrongly portrays opioid addiction. John Iadarola and Lindsey Ellefson break it down on The Damage Report. Follow The Damage Report on Facebook: http...
YouTube
1
0 Comments 0 Shares