Bolsheviks

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Jews have gone through persecution for 40 years from 1880 to 1920. If you have seen your family members, beaten, starved, and murdered! Would you have a warm fuzzy feeling of love for the people who did this to you? If some people came to you and promised you a better life if you joined th

The fact is Bolsheviks take their name after what they were, they were Russian or Slavic. At the height of Jewish participation there were only 6% of the communist party that were Jewish. Stalin was not Jewish, he was Russian, so was Lenin, when Stalin took office he expelled the Jews, so no Jews in power then. The Jews siding with the Communist made sense, the imperial Russians tried for years to wipe them out, pogrom after pogrom, it is little wonder that the Jews in Russia found communism preferable to the royals who kept killing them.

Jews have gone through persecution for 40 years from 1880 to 1920. If you have seen your family members, beaten, starved, and murdered! Would you have a warm fuzzy feeling of love for the people who did this to you? If some people came to you and promised you a better life if you joined them, what would you do?

Antisemitism in the Russian Empire existed both culturally and institutionally. The Jews were restricted to live within the Pale of Settlement, and suffered pogroms. Between 1881 and 1920, more than two million Jews left Russia.

Jews in the Russian Empire faced periods of anti-Semitic discriminatory policies and persecutions.  Jewish people were restricted to the Pale of Settlement within Russia, the territory where they could live or immigrate to. Alexander III escalated anti-Jewish policies. Beginning in the 1880s, waves of anti-Jewish pogroms swept across different regions of the empire for several decades. More than two million Jews fled Russia between 1880 and 1920, mostly to the United States. My great grand parent were among them. They immigrated from Belarus in 1896 and setteled down in New Orleans Louisiana where my grand father and father were born.

The Pale of Settlement took away many of the rights that the Jewish people of the late 17th century Russia were experiencing. At this time, the Jewish people were restricted to a small area of what is current day Belarus, 

Lithuania, Poland and Ukraine. Where Western Europe was experiencing emancipation at this time, the laws for the Jewish people were getting more strict. The general attitude towards Jewish people was to look down on the religion and the people. It was as both a religion and a race, something that one could not escape if they tried. Slowly, the Jewish people were allowed to move further east towards a less crowded population. This was a small change, and did not come to all Jewish people, and not even a small minority of them.  In this more spread out area, the Jewish people lived in communities, known as Schtetls. These communities were very similar to what would be known as ghettos in World War II, with the cramped and subpar living conditions

As a result, many Jews supported gradual or revolutionary changes within the Russian Empire. Those movements ranged from the far left (Jewish AnarchismBundistsBolsheviksMensheviks) to moderate left (Trudoviks) and constitutionalist (Constitutional Democrats) parties. On the eve of the February Revolution in 1917, of about 23,000 members of the Bolshevik party 364 (about 1.6%) were known to be ethnic Jews. According to the 1922 Bolshevik party census, there were 19,564 Jewish Bolsheviks, comprising 5.21% of the total, and in the 1920s of the 417 members of the Central Executive Committee, the party Central Committee, the Presidium of the Executive of the Soviets of the USSR and the Russian Republic, the People's Commissars, 6% were ethnic Jews. Between 1936 and 1940, during the Great PurgeYezhovshchina and after the rapprochement with Nazi Germany, Stalin had largely eliminated Jews from senior party, government, diplomatic, security and military positions.

Some scholars have grossly exaggerated Jewish presence in the Soviet Communist Party. For example, journalist David Aaronovitch quotes Alfred Jensen as saying that in the 1920s "75 per cent of the leading Bolsheviks" were "of Jewish origin". According to Aaronovitch, "a cursory examination of membership of the top committees shows this figure to be an absurd exaggeration".