• With Petition to Congress, 100,000+ People Demand Green New Deal 'That Fixes Our Food System'
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/07/19/petition-congress-100000-people-demand-green-new-deal-fixes-our-food-system
    Jessica Corbett, staff writer

    A coalition of environmental, farmworker, public health, and food safety advocacy groups on Thursday delivered to Congress a petition signed by more than 100,000 people which calls for a Green New Deal "that fixes our food system" to combat the climate crisis.

    The petition echoes a letter that more than 300 organizations sent to federal lawmakers in April on behalf of their millions of members.

    The letter came about two months after Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) introduced the historic Green New Deal resolution supported by a growing grassroots movement and dozens of Democrats in Congress.

    "Supporting family farms, achieving universal access to healthy foods, and investing in sustainable farming and land-use practices that increase soil health are critical components of any comprehensive Green New Deal," declares the new petition, which notes that in addition to being a top generator of jobs, the U.S. food and farming sector is also a top generator of planet-heating emissions.

    "To reduce emissions and bolster our nation's resilience in the face of the climate crisis, we must enact policies that transform unsustainable industrial agriculture, reduce food sector consolidation, as well as empower farmers and ranchers to adopt organic and agroecological practices," the petition says.

    "These policies must support diversified and ecologically regenerative farming techniques that reduce greenhouse gases and other pollution, boost soil health, and sequester carbon in soil—enhancing local and regional food security, economic well-being, and biodiversity."

    The petition outlines specific food and farming policies that signatories believe should be prioritized in the Green New Deal:

    Carbon reduction, sequestration, and climate resilience;
    Fair prices for farmers, ranchers, and fishers; antitrust measures that help reverse food sector consolidation; and healthy working conditions with family-sustaining living wages for workers;
    Diversified, resilient local, and regional food economies anchored by family farmers; ranchers and fishers that ensure healthy, sustainable food for all to combat consolidation in the food and farming sector; and reverse the rapid loss of farmers and deterioration of farmland;
    Avoid "false solutions" and agribusiness-sponsored proposals that do nothing to address the systemic causes of our climate crisis and delay progress;
    Protection for workers, rural communities, consumer health and soil productivity through the transition away from harmful agrochemical use in agricultural practices and production;
    Ensure that those most affected by the exploitation of people and the environment of the current agricultural system and who have experience and knowledge to contribute have a seat at the table in decisions and negotiations.
    The petition is a collaborative project between the Center for Food Safety, Friends of the Earth, the HEAL Food Alliance, the Farmworker Association of Florida, PANNA, 198 Methods, the Daily Kos, and the Organic Consumers Association, which tweeted about the key demands with the hashtag #GreenNewFoodDeal.

    "If we are to address the climate crisis, we must transform our food system," Lisa Archer, food and agriculture director for Friends of the Earth, said in a statement Thursday. "We have no time to waste."

    Jeannie Economos, Pesticide Safety and Environmental Health Project coordinator of the Farmworker Association of Florida, pointed out that "agriculture—and the farmworker families on which it depends—are some of the first victims of a changing global climate."

    "We need a Green New Deal that centers family farmers, farm workers, and food workers," said Navina Khanna, director of the HEAL Food Alliance. "Making fundamental changes to our food and farming system is urgent and central to stabilizing our climate, and ensuring food security for current and future generations, and making sure that all people working in the system do so with meaning and dignity."

    The alliance shared a link to the petition—which is still available online for additional signatures—in a tweet Thursday:

    HEAL Food Alliance @HEAL_Food
    We need a #GreenNewFoodDeal that fixes our #food system in order to combat #climatechange. 100,000 signers (and counting!) agree that addressing food and #agriculture issues should be central to any #GreenNewDeal. http://bit.ly/greennewfooddeal … RT!
    With Petition to Congress, 100,000+ People Demand Green New Deal 'That Fixes Our Food System' https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/07/19/petition-congress-100000-people-demand-green-new-deal-fixes-our-food-system Jessica Corbett, staff writer A coalition of environmental, farmworker, public health, and food safety advocacy groups on Thursday delivered to Congress a petition signed by more than 100,000 people which calls for a Green New Deal "that fixes our food system" to combat the climate crisis. The petition echoes a letter that more than 300 organizations sent to federal lawmakers in April on behalf of their millions of members. The letter came about two months after Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.) introduced the historic Green New Deal resolution supported by a growing grassroots movement and dozens of Democrats in Congress. "Supporting family farms, achieving universal access to healthy foods, and investing in sustainable farming and land-use practices that increase soil health are critical components of any comprehensive Green New Deal," declares the new petition, which notes that in addition to being a top generator of jobs, the U.S. food and farming sector is also a top generator of planet-heating emissions. "To reduce emissions and bolster our nation's resilience in the face of the climate crisis, we must enact policies that transform unsustainable industrial agriculture, reduce food sector consolidation, as well as empower farmers and ranchers to adopt organic and agroecological practices," the petition says. "These policies must support diversified and ecologically regenerative farming techniques that reduce greenhouse gases and other pollution, boost soil health, and sequester carbon in soil—enhancing local and regional food security, economic well-being, and biodiversity." The petition outlines specific food and farming policies that signatories believe should be prioritized in the Green New Deal: Carbon reduction, sequestration, and climate resilience; Fair prices for farmers, ranchers, and fishers; antitrust measures that help reverse food sector consolidation; and healthy working conditions with family-sustaining living wages for workers; Diversified, resilient local, and regional food economies anchored by family farmers; ranchers and fishers that ensure healthy, sustainable food for all to combat consolidation in the food and farming sector; and reverse the rapid loss of farmers and deterioration of farmland; Avoid "false solutions" and agribusiness-sponsored proposals that do nothing to address the systemic causes of our climate crisis and delay progress; Protection for workers, rural communities, consumer health and soil productivity through the transition away from harmful agrochemical use in agricultural practices and production; Ensure that those most affected by the exploitation of people and the environment of the current agricultural system and who have experience and knowledge to contribute have a seat at the table in decisions and negotiations. The petition is a collaborative project between the Center for Food Safety, Friends of the Earth, the HEAL Food Alliance, the Farmworker Association of Florida, PANNA, 198 Methods, the Daily Kos, and the Organic Consumers Association, which tweeted about the key demands with the hashtag #GreenNewFoodDeal. "If we are to address the climate crisis, we must transform our food system," Lisa Archer, food and agriculture director for Friends of the Earth, said in a statement Thursday. "We have no time to waste." Jeannie Economos, Pesticide Safety and Environmental Health Project coordinator of the Farmworker Association of Florida, pointed out that "agriculture—and the farmworker families on which it depends—are some of the first victims of a changing global climate." "We need a Green New Deal that centers family farmers, farm workers, and food workers," said Navina Khanna, director of the HEAL Food Alliance. "Making fundamental changes to our food and farming system is urgent and central to stabilizing our climate, and ensuring food security for current and future generations, and making sure that all people working in the system do so with meaning and dignity." The alliance shared a link to the petition—which is still available online for additional signatures—in a tweet Thursday: HEAL Food Alliance @HEAL_Food We need a #GreenNewFoodDeal that fixes our #food system in order to combat #climatechange. 100,000 signers (and counting!) agree that addressing food and #agriculture issues should be central to any #GreenNewDeal. http://bit.ly/greennewfooddeal … RT!
    With Petition to Congress, 100,000+ People Demand Green New Deal 'That Fixes Our Food System'
    "We can't solve the climate crisis without taking food & ag into account!"
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  • 'The Climate Crisis Doesn't Go on Summer Holiday, And Neither Will We,' Says Greta Thunberg as #FridaysForFuture Returns to the Streets
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/07/05/climate-crisis-doesnt-go-summer-holiday-and-neither-will-we-says-greta-thunberg
    Jessica Corbett, staff writer

    For many children around the world, school is out for summer—but that hasn't stopped youth activists from taking to the streets to demand governments pursue bold solutions to battle the global climate emergency.

    "The climate crisis doesn't go on summer holiday, and neither will we. We go on," tweeted Greta Thunberg, the Swedish teenager who sparked the global climate student strike movement by protesting alone outside her country's parliament last year.

    As experts continue to sound the alarm over record-breaking temperatures worldwide, youth strikers from across the globe posted photos of their demonstrations Friday on social media with the hashtags #FridaysForFuture, #SchoolStrike4Climate, and #ClimateStrike.

    "As days passes by, so does our future draw nearer. It doesn't matter the course you study nor your age, we need you to join climate justice," said organizer Oladosu Adenike, sharing a photo of schoolchildren in Nigeria.

    Youth in Dhaka, Bangladesh held signs that read "save the Earth, save yourself" and "come forward to save our tomorrow."

    Tweeting from Turkey, 11-year-old Deniz Çevikus reported from a popular spot beside the Bosporus that "people are interested but shy."

    Others shared photos from Germany, Uganda, and Switzerland:

    The climate action group Extinction Rebellion tweeted Friday that "the millions of children striking from school will become millions of adults striking from work if our governments continue to fail to #ActNow on the climate and ecological emergencies."

    In May, as Common Dreams reported, "well-known adult climate activists answered a call to action from school strikers with a pledge to join global protests." The adults announced in an op-ed that on Sept. 20, "we're walking out of our workplaces and homes to spend the day demanding action on the climate crisis, the greatest existential threat that all of us face."

    Penn State University climate scientist Michael E. Mann was among those who signed on to the op-ed. In an interview with Hill[dot]TV that aired earlier this week, Mann said that to combat the climate crisis, "we do need a world-war type mobilization and that means putting in place incentives to move our economy as quickly as we can away from fossil fuels to renewable energy."

    "There's a legitimate policy debate to be had about how we do that, but there isn't a legitimate debate to be had anymore about the need to do that," added Mann, who also argued that electing any Democratic 2020 candidate would be better than re-electing President Donald Trump.

    "There's a world of difference of between where the Trump administration is and all of the Democrats, and I would hate to see too much infighting at this point," Mann said. "Let's make sure that we elect a president who's not going to continue to lead us backward and defy the rest of the world as we try to act on this existential threat."
    'The Climate Crisis Doesn't Go on Summer Holiday, And Neither Will We,' Says Greta Thunberg as #FridaysForFuture Returns to the Streets https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/07/05/climate-crisis-doesnt-go-summer-holiday-and-neither-will-we-says-greta-thunberg Jessica Corbett, staff writer For many children around the world, school is out for summer—but that hasn't stopped youth activists from taking to the streets to demand governments pursue bold solutions to battle the global climate emergency. "The climate crisis doesn't go on summer holiday, and neither will we. We go on," tweeted Greta Thunberg, the Swedish teenager who sparked the global climate student strike movement by protesting alone outside her country's parliament last year. As experts continue to sound the alarm over record-breaking temperatures worldwide, youth strikers from across the globe posted photos of their demonstrations Friday on social media with the hashtags #FridaysForFuture, #SchoolStrike4Climate, and #ClimateStrike. "As days passes by, so does our future draw nearer. It doesn't matter the course you study nor your age, we need you to join climate justice," said organizer Oladosu Adenike, sharing a photo of schoolchildren in Nigeria. Youth in Dhaka, Bangladesh held signs that read "save the Earth, save yourself" and "come forward to save our tomorrow." Tweeting from Turkey, 11-year-old Deniz Çevikus reported from a popular spot beside the Bosporus that "people are interested but shy." Others shared photos from Germany, Uganda, and Switzerland: The climate action group Extinction Rebellion tweeted Friday that "the millions of children striking from school will become millions of adults striking from work if our governments continue to fail to #ActNow on the climate and ecological emergencies." In May, as Common Dreams reported, "well-known adult climate activists answered a call to action from school strikers with a pledge to join global protests." The adults announced in an op-ed that on Sept. 20, "we're walking out of our workplaces and homes to spend the day demanding action on the climate crisis, the greatest existential threat that all of us face." Penn State University climate scientist Michael E. Mann was among those who signed on to the op-ed. In an interview with Hill[dot]TV that aired earlier this week, Mann said that to combat the climate crisis, "we do need a world-war type mobilization and that means putting in place incentives to move our economy as quickly as we can away from fossil fuels to renewable energy." "There's a legitimate policy debate to be had about how we do that, but there isn't a legitimate debate to be had anymore about the need to do that," added Mann, who also argued that electing any Democratic 2020 candidate would be better than re-electing President Donald Trump. "There's a world of difference of between where the Trump administration is and all of the Democrats, and I would hate to see too much infighting at this point," Mann said. "Let's make sure that we elect a president who's not going to continue to lead us backward and defy the rest of the world as we try to act on this existential threat."
    'The Climate Crisis Doesn't Go on Summer Holiday, And Neither Will We,' Says Greta Thunberg as #FridaysForFuture Returns to the Streets
    A campaigner in Nigeria adds, "It doesn't matter the course you study nor your age, we need you to join climate justice."
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  • We have made a large number of upgrades to Canund Social Network.

    Video Upload Free up to 5 videos each video can be as large as 100 MB
    Audio upload
    File Upload
    Likes, Harts, Angry face for a post.
    Trending Hashtags
    Apple App
    Refer Friends upgrades
    Instant friends, groups, and page likes, for new members so they don't see the site as empty when they join.
    Better control for Ad manager.
    Unlimited videos for Pro Accounts.
    Video section for the profile area, groups, pages, events.
    Video static picture.
    Your information under settings allows a person to download their own info.

    Upgrades to come:

    Rewards program to trade site currency tor items.
    Live Video and audio Calling threw messenger
    Upgraded server
    More video options uploads option as it doesn't work for all video types.
    Live Podcasting
    Friends what they are doing on sidebar
    Better custom apps for main and messenger
    Live-streaming
    Invite all button to groups, pages, events.
    Crypto Market
    Fundraising
    Games
    We have made a large number of upgrades to Canund Social Network. Video Upload Free up to 5 videos each video can be as large as 100 MB Audio upload File Upload Likes, Harts, Angry face for a post. Trending Hashtags Apple App Refer Friends upgrades Instant friends, groups, and page likes, for new members so they don't see the site as empty when they join. Better control for Ad manager. Unlimited videos for Pro Accounts. Video section for the profile area, groups, pages, events. Video static picture. Your information under settings allows a person to download their own info. Upgrades to come: Rewards program to trade site currency tor items. Live Video and audio Calling threw messenger Upgraded server More video options uploads option as it doesn't work for all video types. Live Podcasting Friends what they are doing on sidebar Better custom apps for main and messenger Live-streaming Invite all button to groups, pages, events. Crypto Market Fundraising Games
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  • hello
    #hashtag
    hello #hashtag
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  • "While everyone is using the hashtag #VoxAdpocalypse and blaming some faggot spic from Vox for the big YouTube shutdown, the Jews of the Anti-Defamation League are openly announcing that they’re behind it." - Andrew Anglin

    https://dailystormer.name/shock-as-jews-announce-that-theyre-behind-the-mass-youtube-shutdown/
    "While everyone is using the hashtag #VoxAdpocalypse and blaming some faggot spic from Vox for the big YouTube shutdown, the Jews of the Anti-Defamation League are openly announcing that they’re behind it." - Andrew Anglin https://dailystormer.name/shock-as-jews-announce-that-theyre-behind-the-mass-youtube-shutdown/
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  • Extreme Flooding Across Midwest 'Exactly In Line' With Scientific Warnings of Climate Crisis: Experts
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/06/04/extreme-flooding-across-midwest-exactly-line-scientific-warnings-climate-crisis
    Julia Conley, staff writer

    Farmers and residents across the Midwest are currently "living climate change," according to experts and scientists who are observing catastrophic flooding from one of the rainiest springs on record.

    Since March, heavy rains in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, and other states have led the Mississippi River and other waterways to overflow, with the Mississippi cresting at more than 21 feet in one Iowa city on Sunday—the second highest level since historic flooding in 1993 decimated farms, homes, and whole towns.

    At least three people have been killed as a result of the floods so far, and tens of thousands have been displaced.

    Drone footage from Sunday showed a levee on the Mississippi River breaking, forcing 250 people from their homes in the middle of the night in Winfield, Missouri.

    Climate experts including meteorologist Eric Holthaus and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben tweeted that the "unprecedented" flooding was new evidence of a "hot new world."

    While a rainy season is not necessarily indicative of the effects of the climate crisis, the nonprofit climate action group Earthjustice wrote that the relentlessness of the current flooding and its level of destruction "is not normal."

    As Common Dreams reported last week, the especially rainy season has been linked to an unusually high number of tornadoes in the Midwest and all the way to the East Coast in recent weeks. About 270 tornadoes were recorded last month, including several that hit the region over 13 consecutive days.

    As National Geographic reported Monday, the floods serve as some of the most tangible evidence that the changing climate is affecting farmers' livelihoods.

    Increased water vapor in the atmosphere can result from a warmer climate, and "climate scientists say the devastating rains falling over the Midwest are exactly in line with what they’ve been predicting," Sarah Gibbons wrote.

    "Overall, it's climate change," Donald Wuebbles, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, told National Geographic. "We expect an increase in total precipitation in the Midwest, especially in winter and spring, with more coming as larger events."

    "We are living climate change right now," added Evan DeLucia, a plant biologist at the university.

    For farmers, extreme flooding has meant they are able to plant far less corn and soybeans, as heavy rainfall can be just as damaging to crops as drought and extreme heat. Only 58 percent of the former and 29 percent of the former were planted by the end of May, as growing season was nearly over. Farmers shared the flood's effects on their crops with the hashtag #NoPlant2019.

    As a result of the unusually rainy spring, National Geographic reported, farmers can expect to pay more for corn that they use to feed livestock while consumers will likely pay more for corn and soy products as well.

    While many of the warnings about the effects of the climate crisis focus on coastal cities being washed away by rising sea levels, Megan Molteni wrote last month at Wired, "climate change will bring more moisture to the middle parts of the country too"—a shift for which the Midwest is poorly equipped.

    "After decades of draining wetlands and clearing forests for agricultural use," wrote Molteni, "those changes to the timing, type, and amount of precipitation will fall on a system already profoundly altered in ways that make flooding much more likely."
    Extreme Flooding Across Midwest 'Exactly In Line' With Scientific Warnings of Climate Crisis: Experts https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/06/04/extreme-flooding-across-midwest-exactly-line-scientific-warnings-climate-crisis Julia Conley, staff writer Farmers and residents across the Midwest are currently "living climate change," according to experts and scientists who are observing catastrophic flooding from one of the rainiest springs on record. Since March, heavy rains in Oklahoma, Arkansas, Missouri, and other states have led the Mississippi River and other waterways to overflow, with the Mississippi cresting at more than 21 feet in one Iowa city on Sunday—the second highest level since historic flooding in 1993 decimated farms, homes, and whole towns. At least three people have been killed as a result of the floods so far, and tens of thousands have been displaced. Drone footage from Sunday showed a levee on the Mississippi River breaking, forcing 250 people from their homes in the middle of the night in Winfield, Missouri. Climate experts including meteorologist Eric Holthaus and 350.org co-founder Bill McKibben tweeted that the "unprecedented" flooding was new evidence of a "hot new world." While a rainy season is not necessarily indicative of the effects of the climate crisis, the nonprofit climate action group Earthjustice wrote that the relentlessness of the current flooding and its level of destruction "is not normal." As Common Dreams reported last week, the especially rainy season has been linked to an unusually high number of tornadoes in the Midwest and all the way to the East Coast in recent weeks. About 270 tornadoes were recorded last month, including several that hit the region over 13 consecutive days. As National Geographic reported Monday, the floods serve as some of the most tangible evidence that the changing climate is affecting farmers' livelihoods. Increased water vapor in the atmosphere can result from a warmer climate, and "climate scientists say the devastating rains falling over the Midwest are exactly in line with what they’ve been predicting," Sarah Gibbons wrote. "Overall, it's climate change," Donald Wuebbles, an atmospheric scientist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, told National Geographic. "We expect an increase in total precipitation in the Midwest, especially in winter and spring, with more coming as larger events." "We are living climate change right now," added Evan DeLucia, a plant biologist at the university. For farmers, extreme flooding has meant they are able to plant far less corn and soybeans, as heavy rainfall can be just as damaging to crops as drought and extreme heat. Only 58 percent of the former and 29 percent of the former were planted by the end of May, as growing season was nearly over. Farmers shared the flood's effects on their crops with the hashtag #NoPlant2019. As a result of the unusually rainy spring, National Geographic reported, farmers can expect to pay more for corn that they use to feed livestock while consumers will likely pay more for corn and soy products as well. While many of the warnings about the effects of the climate crisis focus on coastal cities being washed away by rising sea levels, Megan Molteni wrote last month at Wired, "climate change will bring more moisture to the middle parts of the country too"—a shift for which the Midwest is poorly equipped. "After decades of draining wetlands and clearing forests for agricultural use," wrote Molteni, "those changes to the timing, type, and amount of precipitation will fall on a system already profoundly altered in ways that make flooding much more likely."
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  • 'Beautiful Trouble' Grows With Friday Climate Strikes on Multiple Continents
    Over 700 Strikes Set To Take Place
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/05/03/beautiful-trouble-grows-friday-climate-strikes-multiple-continents
    Andrea Germanos, staff writer

    The momentum for the weekly climate strikes shows no sign of abating as young people in hundreds of communities across the globe are hitting the streets on Friday to make a stand against the environmental crisis.

    "We can make a difference," said Matilda Lane-Rose, one of the protesters in Perth, Australia.

    The Fridays for Future website has 725 strikes mapped out for the day.

    They cover the Americas from Canada to Chile; Europe from Norway to Italy; Africa from Mauritania to South Africa; Asia from South Korea to India in Asia; and multiple marches in Australia and New Zealand.

    Swedish teenage activist Greta Thunberg, who catalyzed the school strikes, said in a tweet that they "will be extra big in Canada, India, USA, Mexico, and Australia."

    One of the Australian actions took place in the city of Newcastle. A social media user who captured video of the youthful climate strikers there framed their action as "beautiful trouble."

    Images of other rallies are being shared on social media:

    The global actions drew cheers from the Sunrise Movement—a driving force behind the pending Green New Deal legislation in the U.S.

    New data on levels of atmospheric CO2 backs up the climate protesters' demand for swift action to rein in greenhouse gas emissions.

    Referring to April's average of 413.2 ppm, meteorologist and Grist writer Eric Holthaus tweeted, "This is an emergency."

    On Twitter, follow the hashtags #YouthClimateStrike, #SchoolStrike4Climate, and #FridaysforFuture to follow the day's actions as they unfold.
    'Beautiful Trouble' Grows With Friday Climate Strikes on Multiple Continents Over 700 Strikes Set To Take Place https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/05/03/beautiful-trouble-grows-friday-climate-strikes-multiple-continents Andrea Germanos, staff writer The momentum for the weekly climate strikes shows no sign of abating as young people in hundreds of communities across the globe are hitting the streets on Friday to make a stand against the environmental crisis. "We can make a difference," said Matilda Lane-Rose, one of the protesters in Perth, Australia. The Fridays for Future website has 725 strikes mapped out for the day. They cover the Americas from Canada to Chile; Europe from Norway to Italy; Africa from Mauritania to South Africa; Asia from South Korea to India in Asia; and multiple marches in Australia and New Zealand. Swedish teenage activist Greta Thunberg, who catalyzed the school strikes, said in a tweet that they "will be extra big in Canada, India, USA, Mexico, and Australia." One of the Australian actions took place in the city of Newcastle. A social media user who captured video of the youthful climate strikers there framed their action as "beautiful trouble." Images of other rallies are being shared on social media: The global actions drew cheers from the Sunrise Movement—a driving force behind the pending Green New Deal legislation in the U.S. New data on levels of atmospheric CO2 backs up the climate protesters' demand for swift action to rein in greenhouse gas emissions. Referring to April's average of 413.2 ppm, meteorologist and Grist writer Eric Holthaus tweeted, "This is an emergency." On Twitter, follow the hashtags #YouthClimateStrike, #SchoolStrike4Climate, and #FridaysforFuture to follow the day's actions as they unfold.
    'Beautiful Trouble' Grows With Friday Climate Strikes on Multiple Continents
    Over 700 strikes set to take place
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