• Germany: Merkel Unveils Government's Multibillion Climate Protection Plan [While Trump Announces New Sanctions Against Iran (WHO HAVEN'T DONE A THING THEY'RE ACCUSED OF...)]
    The German government unveiled its climate protection plan until 2030 in Berlin on Friday at a presentation taking place against the backdrop of massive protests on the issue across the globe.

    The programme would see around 54 billion euros ($59 billion) allocated to climate protection projects until 2023.

    "As a scientist, I can say that what impresses me, is when Greta Thunberg says: "Unite behind the science." We're not doing something ideological here. We are doing something for which there is massive evidence that we have to act against it. Those who ignore this scientific evidence saying "We're going to make it somehow" are not acting with awareness of the future, which we did," said Merkel.

    The climate action plan will reportedly include 70 different projects and monitoring missions regarding construction, traffic and agriculture.

    M/S German Chancellor Angela M-Video ID: 20190920 045
    #GDR #ChancellrMerkel #UniteBehindThe Science #GlobalClimateStrike #GretaThunberg #FridaysForFuture #GNDBernie2020
    https://youtu.be/yUGYUbbQn9o
    Ruptly 9/20/19
    Germany: Merkel Unveils Government's Multibillion Climate Protection Plan [While Trump Announces New Sanctions Against Iran (WHO HAVEN'T DONE A THING THEY'RE ACCUSED OF...)] The German government unveiled its climate protection plan until 2030 in Berlin on Friday at a presentation taking place against the backdrop of massive protests on the issue across the globe. The programme would see around 54 billion euros ($59 billion) allocated to climate protection projects until 2023. "As a scientist, I can say that what impresses me, is when Greta Thunberg says: "Unite behind the science." We're not doing something ideological here. We are doing something for which there is massive evidence that we have to act against it. Those who ignore this scientific evidence saying "We're going to make it somehow" are not acting with awareness of the future, which we did," said Merkel. The climate action plan will reportedly include 70 different projects and monitoring missions regarding construction, traffic and agriculture. M/S German Chancellor Angela M-Video ID: 20190920 045 #GDR #ChancellrMerkel #UniteBehindThe Science #GlobalClimateStrike #GretaThunberg #FridaysForFuture #GNDBernie2020 https://youtu.be/yUGYUbbQn9o Ruptly 9/20/19
    Germany: Merkel unveils government's multibillion climate protection plan
    Subscribe to our channel! rupt.ly/subscribe The German government unveiled its climate protection plan until 2030 in Berlin on Friday at a presentation takin...
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  • Urgently Investing $1.8 Trillion to #AdaptOurWorld and Avert 'Climate Apartheid' Could Yield $7.1 Trillion in Benefits, Analysis Shows
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/09/10/urgently-investing-18-trillion-adaptourworld-and-avert-climate-apartheid-could-yield
    Jessica Corbett, staff writer

    Warning that the world is at risk of experiencing a "climate apartheid," a report released Tuesday by the Global Commission on Adaptation found that spending $1.8 trillion globally over a decade on adaptation could yield $7.1 trillion in net benefits.

    The commission's report, Adapt Now: A Global Call for Leadership on Climate Resilience (pdf), outlines the human, environmental, and economic imperatives of investing in adaptation to the human-caused climate crisis. The report highlights the "triple dividend" of urgent, coordinated action: it would avoid future losses, generate positive economic gains, and deliver additional social and environmental benefits.

    The proposed $1.7 trillion investment in climate adaptation and resulting $7.1 trillion in benefits are based on significant spending in five key areas—early warning systems, climate-resilient infrastructure, improved dryland agriculture, mangrove protection, and making water resources more resilient—between 2020 and 2030. The systemic transformations called for in the report particularly aim to address global inequalities that are increasingly exacerbated by the climate emergency.

    UN Climate Change โœ” @UNFCCC
    The #AdaptOurWorld report released today shows:
    Investing $1.8 trillion in climate adaptation could generate $7.1 tn in benefits.

    Leaders around the ๐ŸŒ are calling on governments & businesses to urgently act on climate adaptation.
    Report ๐Ÿ‘‰๐Ÿผ http://bit.ly/2lII1mp
    View image on Twitter
    5:23 AM - Sep 10, 2019

    The commission that produced the new analysis is chaired by former United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates, and World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva. The trio wrote in the report's forward that, in terms of adaptation, "so far the response has been gravely insufficient. Meanwhile, the climate crisis is here, now: wildfires ravage fragile habitats, city taps run dry, droughts scorch the land, and floods destroy people's homes and livelihoods."

    Investing in adaptation "is a moral imperative," Patrick Verkooijen, chief executive of the Global Center on Adaptation, which co-manages the commission with the World Resources Institute, told The Washington Post.

    "Even if we were to live in 1.5 degree world we would need massive adaptation," said Verkooijen, referring to the Paris climate accord goal of limiting average global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. "Investing in adaptation is not a tradeoff with mitigation. We need to do both."

    Absent global adaptation efforts, the report estimates that by 2050, declines in agricultural yields would most seriously impact the world's 500 million small farms, the number of people lacking sufficient water could soar beyond five billion, and rising seas and devastating storms could force hundreds of millions people from their homes—costing coastal urban areas over $1 trillion per year.

    Though the climate crisis is one of the greatest threats humanity faces and it impacts all sectors of society, as the report put it, "people who did the least to cause the problem—especially those living in poverty and fragile areas—are most at risk."

    "We risk a climate apartheid where the wealthy pay to escape, while the rest of the world is left to suffer," Verkooijen warned. "Without bold adaptation action, climate change becomes a life sentence to poverty and suffering for already vulnerable and marginalized people."

    The report comes as the Bahamas is in the beginning stages of what is expected to be a drawn out recovery process after being devastated by Hurricane Dorian, which made landfall on the islands as a Category 5 storm early this month. In what one critic decried as "eco-apartheid," hundreds of Bahamian refugees who lacked a U.S. visa were ordered off a ferry headed for Ft. Lauderdale, Florida this weekend.

    The destruction in the Bahamas spotlighted climate scientists' warnings about the connection between extreme weather—including hurricanes, heatwaves, and fires—and rising temperatures from human activities that produce greenhouse gas emissions. When it comes to hurricanes, for example, experts warn that research suggests the warming world will see an increase in intense storms.

    "We tend not to invest in resilience and climate adaptation efforts until after a disaster has happened, until a lot of the damage has been done," Rob Moore, a policy analyst at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), told InsideClimate News—which graphed the costs and benefits of the new report's recommendations.

    How adaptation efforts can pay off

    Outlining major barriers to global adaptation efforts, the report says that "in addition to knowledge gaps and short-term biases, fragmented responsibilities, poor institutional cooperation, and lack of resources hinder action. Governments lack incentives and funding for agencies to grapple with knowledge gaps, collaborate across silos, and implement innovative solutions."

    NRDC's Moore noted that "these types of investments are things that pay off over the long term, not over a single election cycle."

    Ban, who served as the U.N. chief from January 2007 to December 2016, emphasized the importance of global collaboration on adaptation efforts in a statement Tuesday.

    "Climate change doesn't respect borders: it's an international problem that can only be solved with co-operation and collaboration, across borders and worldwide," he said. "It is becoming increasingly clear that in many parts of the world, our climate has already changed, and we need to adapt with it."

    "Mitigation and adaptation go hand-in-hand as two equally important building blocks of the Paris Climate Change Agreement," Ban continued. "Adaptation is not only the right thing to do, it is also the smart thing to do to boost economic growth and create a climate resilient world."

    Along with events across the globe Tuesday to launch the report, contributors and supporters shared its findings and suggestions on social media with the hashtag #AdaptOurWorld.


    World Resources Inst โœ” @WorldResources
    Today, we call on leaders around the globe to #AdaptOurWorld. #Climate impacts are here now, and adaptation is critical to creating stronger, safer, thriving communities. Join us in calling others to act with unprecedented courage, resources & commitment! http://ow.ly/iKDA50w4lJt

    View image on Twitter
    10:12 AM - Sep 10, 2019

    The commission has produced a series of videos about adaptation efforts around the world—from Costa Rica and India to the Netherlands and New York City—which were shared on social media with the hashtag Tuesday:
    Urgently Investing $1.8 Trillion to #AdaptOurWorld and Avert 'Climate Apartheid' Could Yield $7.1 Trillion in Benefits, Analysis Shows https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/09/10/urgently-investing-18-trillion-adaptourworld-and-avert-climate-apartheid-could-yield Jessica Corbett, staff writer Warning that the world is at risk of experiencing a "climate apartheid," a report released Tuesday by the Global Commission on Adaptation found that spending $1.8 trillion globally over a decade on adaptation could yield $7.1 trillion in net benefits. The commission's report, Adapt Now: A Global Call for Leadership on Climate Resilience (pdf), outlines the human, environmental, and economic imperatives of investing in adaptation to the human-caused climate crisis. The report highlights the "triple dividend" of urgent, coordinated action: it would avoid future losses, generate positive economic gains, and deliver additional social and environmental benefits. The proposed $1.7 trillion investment in climate adaptation and resulting $7.1 trillion in benefits are based on significant spending in five key areas—early warning systems, climate-resilient infrastructure, improved dryland agriculture, mangrove protection, and making water resources more resilient—between 2020 and 2030. The systemic transformations called for in the report particularly aim to address global inequalities that are increasingly exacerbated by the climate emergency. UN Climate Change โœ” @UNFCCC The #AdaptOurWorld report released today shows: Investing $1.8 trillion in climate adaptation could generate $7.1 tn in benefits. Leaders around the ๐ŸŒ are calling on governments & businesses to urgently act on climate adaptation. Report ๐Ÿ‘‰๐Ÿผ http://bit.ly/2lII1mp View image on Twitter 5:23 AM - Sep 10, 2019 The commission that produced the new analysis is chaired by former United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates, and World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva. The trio wrote in the report's forward that, in terms of adaptation, "so far the response has been gravely insufficient. Meanwhile, the climate crisis is here, now: wildfires ravage fragile habitats, city taps run dry, droughts scorch the land, and floods destroy people's homes and livelihoods." Investing in adaptation "is a moral imperative," Patrick Verkooijen, chief executive of the Global Center on Adaptation, which co-manages the commission with the World Resources Institute, told The Washington Post. "Even if we were to live in 1.5 degree world we would need massive adaptation," said Verkooijen, referring to the Paris climate accord goal of limiting average global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. "Investing in adaptation is not a tradeoff with mitigation. We need to do both." Absent global adaptation efforts, the report estimates that by 2050, declines in agricultural yields would most seriously impact the world's 500 million small farms, the number of people lacking sufficient water could soar beyond five billion, and rising seas and devastating storms could force hundreds of millions people from their homes—costing coastal urban areas over $1 trillion per year. Though the climate crisis is one of the greatest threats humanity faces and it impacts all sectors of society, as the report put it, "people who did the least to cause the problem—especially those living in poverty and fragile areas—are most at risk." "We risk a climate apartheid where the wealthy pay to escape, while the rest of the world is left to suffer," Verkooijen warned. "Without bold adaptation action, climate change becomes a life sentence to poverty and suffering for already vulnerable and marginalized people." The report comes as the Bahamas is in the beginning stages of what is expected to be a drawn out recovery process after being devastated by Hurricane Dorian, which made landfall on the islands as a Category 5 storm early this month. In what one critic decried as "eco-apartheid," hundreds of Bahamian refugees who lacked a U.S. visa were ordered off a ferry headed for Ft. Lauderdale, Florida this weekend. The destruction in the Bahamas spotlighted climate scientists' warnings about the connection between extreme weather—including hurricanes, heatwaves, and fires—and rising temperatures from human activities that produce greenhouse gas emissions. When it comes to hurricanes, for example, experts warn that research suggests the warming world will see an increase in intense storms. "We tend not to invest in resilience and climate adaptation efforts until after a disaster has happened, until a lot of the damage has been done," Rob Moore, a policy analyst at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), told InsideClimate News—which graphed the costs and benefits of the new report's recommendations. How adaptation efforts can pay off Outlining major barriers to global adaptation efforts, the report says that "in addition to knowledge gaps and short-term biases, fragmented responsibilities, poor institutional cooperation, and lack of resources hinder action. Governments lack incentives and funding for agencies to grapple with knowledge gaps, collaborate across silos, and implement innovative solutions." NRDC's Moore noted that "these types of investments are things that pay off over the long term, not over a single election cycle." Ban, who served as the U.N. chief from January 2007 to December 2016, emphasized the importance of global collaboration on adaptation efforts in a statement Tuesday. "Climate change doesn't respect borders: it's an international problem that can only be solved with co-operation and collaboration, across borders and worldwide," he said. "It is becoming increasingly clear that in many parts of the world, our climate has already changed, and we need to adapt with it." "Mitigation and adaptation go hand-in-hand as two equally important building blocks of the Paris Climate Change Agreement," Ban continued. "Adaptation is not only the right thing to do, it is also the smart thing to do to boost economic growth and create a climate resilient world." Along with events across the globe Tuesday to launch the report, contributors and supporters shared its findings and suggestions on social media with the hashtag #AdaptOurWorld. World Resources Inst โœ” @WorldResources Today, we call on leaders around the globe to #AdaptOurWorld. #Climate impacts are here now, and adaptation is critical to creating stronger, safer, thriving communities. Join us in calling others to act with unprecedented courage, resources & commitment! http://ow.ly/iKDA50w4lJt View image on Twitter 10:12 AM - Sep 10, 2019 The commission has produced a series of videos about adaptation efforts around the world—from Costa Rica and India to the Netherlands and New York City—which were shared on social media with the hashtag Tuesday:
    Urgently Investing $1.8 Trillion to #AdaptOurWorld and Avert 'Climate Apartheid' Could Yield $7.1 Trillion in Benefits, Analysis Shows
    "Without bold adaptation action, climate change becomes a life sentence to poverty and suffering for already vulnerable and marginalized people."
    WWW.COMMONDREAMS.ORG
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  • With Two Weeks Until #GlobalClimateStrike, Organizing Intensifies in 100+ Countries to Win 'Livable Future for All'
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/09/06/two-weeks-until-globalclimatestrike-organizing-intensifies-100-countries-win-livable
    Jessica Corbett, staff writer

    As youth with the Fridays for Future movement took to the streets Friday, two weeks ahead of the global #ClimateStrike planned for Sept. 20, environmental activists continued to raise awareness about the upcoming protests being organized in more than 100 countries.

    Climate campaigners already have registered over 2,500 strikes worldwide, with more than 450 actions planned for the United States, the advocacy group 350.org announced in a statement Friday.

    To register for an event or find one near you, visit globalclimatestrike.net. For U.S. strikes, visit strikewithus.org.

    The demonstrations on Sept. 20 will kick off a week of action that coincides with a United Nations climate summit in New York City. Tamara Toles O'Laughlin, 350.org's North America director, said Friday that the global strike "is an intergenerational and multiracial moment to make our stand for our right to transformative climate action that preserves a sustainable, healthy, and livable future for all."

    "With the leadership of young people backed by grandparents and parents alike, health workers, teachers, cab drivers and more, now is the time for all of us to come together to demand that real climate leaders at the national, state and local levels hold fossil fuel companies accountable for decades of negligence and damage," added Toles O'Laughlin, recognizing the youth activists that inspired the global movement.

    Some of those youth activists—including Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg—gathered outside the U.N. headquarters in New York Friday, chanting: "No more coal! No more oil! Keep the carbon in the soil!"

    350 dot org โœ” @350 · 9h
    HAPPENING NOW: school strikers with @f4f_nyc and @GretaThunberg are striking outside the UN. #ClimateStrike

    View image on Twitter
    350 dot org โœ” @350
    The youth strikers with @f4f_nyc have unique demands for the #ClimateStrike in NYC on Sept 20:

    โŒNo more fossil fuels
    ๐ŸŒŽGlobally equitable climate solutions + environmental justice
    ๐Ÿ’ฐHold corporate polluters accountable#StrikeWithUs where you live: http://350.org/strike

    Embedded video: https://twitter.com/350/status/1170002773728997376
    10:56 AM - Sep 6, 2019
    Friday was the second consecutive week that Thunberg joined youth protests for urgent climate action outside the U.N. headquarters following her two-week journey across the Atlantic on a carbon emissions-free sailboat. Thunberg tweeted Friday, "Even though I've taken a sabbatical year from school, I will still demonstrate every Friday wherever I am."

    Greta Thunberg โœ” @GretaThunberg
    School strike week 55.
    New York City.
    Even though I’ve taken a sabbatical year from school, I will still demonstrate every Friday wherever I am. #FridaysForFuture #schoolstrike4climate #ClimateStrike

    View image on Twitter
    10:21 AM - Sep 6, 2019

    Xiye Bastida of Fridays For Future NYC explained that the global strike on Sept. 20 "isn't a goal, it's a catalyst for future action."

    "It's a catalyst for the engagement of humanity in the protection of Earth," Bastida continued. "It's a catalyst for realizing the intersectionality that the climate crisis has with every other issue. It's a catalyst for the culmination of hundreds of climate activists who won't stop fighting until the climate emergency is over."

    A campaign by U.K. Student Climate Network shared a video promoting the actions Friday that caught the attention of author and activist Naomi Klein—one of the high-profile adult climate leaders who have spoken out in support of the global strike.

    Naomi Klein โœ” @NaomiAKlein
    Love this. https://twitter.com/Strike4Youth/status/1169929252856315905

    YouthStrike4Climate ๐ŸŒ
    @Strike4Youth
    We’re told we can shop our way out of the climate crisis๐Ÿ˜‚Let’s get serious! โœŠ๐Ÿพ
    Find your nearest climate strike on Fri 20 Sept https://www.ukscn.org/events/r/twclvid2 …#ClimateStrike #GlobalClimateStrike #YouthStrike4Climate #ClimateEmergency #UniteForClimate

    Embedded video: https://twitter.com/Strike4Youth/status/1169929252856315905
    6:46 AM - Sep 6, 2019
    In addition to NYC, activists are organizing strikes in Boston, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, Seattle, Washington D.C., and other major U.S. cities.

    Jesus Villalba Gastelum, a 16-year-old Earth Uprising L.A. city coordinator and Youth Climate Strike Los Angeles organizer, noted that L.A. is "a diverse city of many roots, including Indigenous, Mexican, Spanish, American, and Tongva."

    "We are organizing the L.A. Youth Climate Strike from a place of love, hope, and resolve," said Villalba Gastelum. "Our march is calling out inaction on the climate crisis, and stands in support of refugee rights, human rights, and dignity for all."

    Villalba Gastelum added that "while this mobilization is youth led, we welcome people of all generations to join us."

    Looking ahead to the upcoming actions around the world, Future Coalition executive director Katie Eder said Friday that "our message will be clear—we must act now to avoid the worst effects of climate change because all of our lives depend upon it. We are the new face of the climate revolution and we demand just and equitable climate action."

    The Future Coalition, which is coordinating the U.S. youth-led strikes, has released a list of demands for the actions. Fast Company detailed those demands in a report earlier this week:

    A Green New Deal: Building on "the" Green New Deal resolution in Congress, this calls for transforming the economy to 100 percent renewable energy by 2030, while creating jobs and ending leases and permits for fossil fuel projects.

    Respect for indigenous land and sovereignty: Honoring treaties protecting indigenous land by ending resource extraction in and affecting those areas.
    Environmental justice: Investing in the communities affected most by poverty and pollution.

    Protecting biodiversity: Protecting and restoring 50 percent of the world’s lands and oceans and stopping all deforestation by 2030.

    Sustainable agriculture: Investing in regenerative agriculture and ending subsidies for industrial agriculture.

    "Too often, we think about solutions in a very small-minded way, inside the box," 19-year-old Eder told Fast Company. "We don't have time to stay in the box. We really need to be more innovative with our solutions and ask for what we need, not what we think could be possible or has been possible in the past."

    350.org executive director May Boeve, in the group's statement Friday, outlined the emergency the world currently faces and what needs to be done to address it.

    "Climate breakdown is one of the greatest human rights issues we face. Fighting climate breakdown is about much more than emissions and scientific metrics—it's about fighting for a just and sustainable world that works for all of us," she said. "We need to start by phasing out fossil fuels, building real and long lasting solutions, and prioritizing the communities at the frontline of the climate crisis."
    With Two Weeks Until #GlobalClimateStrike, Organizing Intensifies in 100+ Countries to Win 'Livable Future for All' https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/09/06/two-weeks-until-globalclimatestrike-organizing-intensifies-100-countries-win-livable Jessica Corbett, staff writer As youth with the Fridays for Future movement took to the streets Friday, two weeks ahead of the global #ClimateStrike planned for Sept. 20, environmental activists continued to raise awareness about the upcoming protests being organized in more than 100 countries. Climate campaigners already have registered over 2,500 strikes worldwide, with more than 450 actions planned for the United States, the advocacy group 350.org announced in a statement Friday. To register for an event or find one near you, visit globalclimatestrike.net. For U.S. strikes, visit strikewithus.org. The demonstrations on Sept. 20 will kick off a week of action that coincides with a United Nations climate summit in New York City. Tamara Toles O'Laughlin, 350.org's North America director, said Friday that the global strike "is an intergenerational and multiracial moment to make our stand for our right to transformative climate action that preserves a sustainable, healthy, and livable future for all." "With the leadership of young people backed by grandparents and parents alike, health workers, teachers, cab drivers and more, now is the time for all of us to come together to demand that real climate leaders at the national, state and local levels hold fossil fuel companies accountable for decades of negligence and damage," added Toles O'Laughlin, recognizing the youth activists that inspired the global movement. Some of those youth activists—including Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg—gathered outside the U.N. headquarters in New York Friday, chanting: "No more coal! No more oil! Keep the carbon in the soil!" 350 dot org โœ” @350 · 9h HAPPENING NOW: school strikers with @f4f_nyc and @GretaThunberg are striking outside the UN. #ClimateStrike View image on Twitter 350 dot org โœ” @350 The youth strikers with @f4f_nyc have unique demands for the #ClimateStrike in NYC on Sept 20: โŒNo more fossil fuels ๐ŸŒŽGlobally equitable climate solutions + environmental justice ๐Ÿ’ฐHold corporate polluters accountable#StrikeWithUs where you live: http://350.org/strike Embedded video: https://twitter.com/350/status/1170002773728997376 10:56 AM - Sep 6, 2019 Friday was the second consecutive week that Thunberg joined youth protests for urgent climate action outside the U.N. headquarters following her two-week journey across the Atlantic on a carbon emissions-free sailboat. Thunberg tweeted Friday, "Even though I've taken a sabbatical year from school, I will still demonstrate every Friday wherever I am." Greta Thunberg โœ” @GretaThunberg School strike week 55. New York City. Even though I’ve taken a sabbatical year from school, I will still demonstrate every Friday wherever I am. #FridaysForFuture #schoolstrike4climate #ClimateStrike View image on Twitter 10:21 AM - Sep 6, 2019 Xiye Bastida of Fridays For Future NYC explained that the global strike on Sept. 20 "isn't a goal, it's a catalyst for future action." "It's a catalyst for the engagement of humanity in the protection of Earth," Bastida continued. "It's a catalyst for realizing the intersectionality that the climate crisis has with every other issue. It's a catalyst for the culmination of hundreds of climate activists who won't stop fighting until the climate emergency is over." A campaign by U.K. Student Climate Network shared a video promoting the actions Friday that caught the attention of author and activist Naomi Klein—one of the high-profile adult climate leaders who have spoken out in support of the global strike. Naomi Klein โœ” @NaomiAKlein Love this. https://twitter.com/Strike4Youth/status/1169929252856315905 … YouthStrike4Climate ๐ŸŒ @Strike4Youth We’re told we can shop our way out of the climate crisis๐Ÿ˜‚Let’s get serious! โœŠ๐Ÿพ Find your nearest climate strike on Fri 20 Sept https://www.ukscn.org/events/r/twclvid2 …#ClimateStrike #GlobalClimateStrike #YouthStrike4Climate #ClimateEmergency #UniteForClimate Embedded video: https://twitter.com/Strike4Youth/status/1169929252856315905 6:46 AM - Sep 6, 2019 In addition to NYC, activists are organizing strikes in Boston, Chicago, Denver, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, Seattle, Washington D.C., and other major U.S. cities. Jesus Villalba Gastelum, a 16-year-old Earth Uprising L.A. city coordinator and Youth Climate Strike Los Angeles organizer, noted that L.A. is "a diverse city of many roots, including Indigenous, Mexican, Spanish, American, and Tongva." "We are organizing the L.A. Youth Climate Strike from a place of love, hope, and resolve," said Villalba Gastelum. "Our march is calling out inaction on the climate crisis, and stands in support of refugee rights, human rights, and dignity for all." Villalba Gastelum added that "while this mobilization is youth led, we welcome people of all generations to join us." Looking ahead to the upcoming actions around the world, Future Coalition executive director Katie Eder said Friday that "our message will be clear—we must act now to avoid the worst effects of climate change because all of our lives depend upon it. We are the new face of the climate revolution and we demand just and equitable climate action." The Future Coalition, which is coordinating the U.S. youth-led strikes, has released a list of demands for the actions. Fast Company detailed those demands in a report earlier this week: A Green New Deal: Building on "the" Green New Deal resolution in Congress, this calls for transforming the economy to 100 percent renewable energy by 2030, while creating jobs and ending leases and permits for fossil fuel projects. Respect for indigenous land and sovereignty: Honoring treaties protecting indigenous land by ending resource extraction in and affecting those areas. Environmental justice: Investing in the communities affected most by poverty and pollution. Protecting biodiversity: Protecting and restoring 50 percent of the world’s lands and oceans and stopping all deforestation by 2030. Sustainable agriculture: Investing in regenerative agriculture and ending subsidies for industrial agriculture. "Too often, we think about solutions in a very small-minded way, inside the box," 19-year-old Eder told Fast Company. "We don't have time to stay in the box. We really need to be more innovative with our solutions and ask for what we need, not what we think could be possible or has been possible in the past." 350.org executive director May Boeve, in the group's statement Friday, outlined the emergency the world currently faces and what needs to be done to address it. "Climate breakdown is one of the greatest human rights issues we face. Fighting climate breakdown is about much more than emissions and scientific metrics—it's about fighting for a just and sustainable world that works for all of us," she said. "We need to start by phasing out fossil fuels, building real and long lasting solutions, and prioritizing the communities at the frontline of the climate crisis."
    With Two Weeks Until #GlobalClimateStrike, Organizing Intensifies in 100+ Countries to Win 'Livable Future for All'
    "Our message will be clear—we must act now to avoid the worst effects of climate change because all of our lives depend upon it."
    WWW.COMMONDREAMS.ORG
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  • Big Ag Closes Plants as Grow Zones Shift - Tyson Fire...We're Seeing The Wholesale Shutdown Of This Food System-Time To GROW HEMP & FOOD Farmers & Citizens?
    Modern agriculture is unable to cope with the perfect cosmic storm of changes.

    Del Monte is closing US production plants (in WI, MN, and IL) and moving operations further South...or indoors! Likewise, Cargill sold off all assets in Ontario.

    Tyson fire offlines 6% of US beef pipeline.

    As major components of modern agriculture are failing, the more significant realization is that these conglomerates have ALREADY GIVEN UP on the current grow zones and started preparing for the tougher growing seasons ahead.

    Have you? START GROWING TODAY.
    #GrandSolarMinimum #MagneticReversal #IceAgeFarmer
    https://youtu.be/9zOmO1KZa4w
    Ice Age Farmer 8/27/19
    Big Ag Closes Plants as Grow Zones Shift - Tyson Fire...We're Seeing The Wholesale Shutdown Of This Food System-Time To GROW HEMP & FOOD Farmers & Citizens? Modern agriculture is unable to cope with the perfect cosmic storm of changes. Del Monte is closing US production plants (in WI, MN, and IL) and moving operations further South...or indoors! Likewise, Cargill sold off all assets in Ontario. Tyson fire offlines 6% of US beef pipeline. As major components of modern agriculture are failing, the more significant realization is that these conglomerates have ALREADY GIVEN UP on the current grow zones and started preparing for the tougher growing seasons ahead. Have you? START GROWING TODAY. #GrandSolarMinimum #MagneticReversal #IceAgeFarmer https://youtu.be/9zOmO1KZa4w Ice Age Farmer 8/27/19
    Big Ag Closes Plants as Grow Zones Shift - Tyson Fire
    Del Monte is closing US production plants (in WI, MN, and IL) and moving operations further South...or indoors! Likewise, Cargill sold off all assets in Onta...
    YouTube
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  • Just Who Got Trump's Farm Bailouts?
    https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/08/24/just-who-got-trumps-farm-bailouts
    Jim Hightower

    Donald Trump loves farmers. We know this because he says so. “Farmers, I LOVE YOU!” he declared in December.

    But he’s been “loving” them to death, with policies that are causing farm prices to tumble, miring our ag economy in the ditch and creating a rising tsunami of farm bankruptcies.

    Then came Trump’s doofus of an ag secretary, Sonny Perdue, who publicly insulted farmers by branding them “whiners” for daring to complain about policies causing them to lose income and their farms.

    So, as an “I love you” make-up gesture, Trump has been sending big bouquets of money to some of his beloved farmers. Our money. Lots of it — $28 billion so far in what he cynically (and comically) calls a “Market Facilitation Program,” otherwise known as a taxpayer bailout.

    But Trump Love turns out to be highly selective, with more than half of the government payments going to the biggest farm owners.

    The Agriculture Department initially announced a $125,000 limit on the amount any one farm could get, but every Trump deal seems to have a gimmick in it to give a special break to the slickest operators.

    The slickum in this deal is that assorted members of a family are allowed to claim that they’re owners of the same farm and thus get bailout bucks — even if they do no actual farming and live in New York City!

    One Missouri farm family, for example, got $2.8 million worth of subsidy love from Trump, and more than 80 families topped half-a-million in payments.

    Meanwhile, the great majority of farmers have gotten zilch from Donald the Dealmaker — and 80 percent of eligible grain farmers (the smaller producers most endangered by his bad policies) have received less than $5,000.

    So Trump’s “market facilitation” is squeezing the many who are most in need, while helping a few of the largest get even bigger.
    Just Who Got Trump's Farm Bailouts? https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/08/24/just-who-got-trumps-farm-bailouts Jim Hightower Donald Trump loves farmers. We know this because he says so. “Farmers, I LOVE YOU!” he declared in December. But he’s been “loving” them to death, with policies that are causing farm prices to tumble, miring our ag economy in the ditch and creating a rising tsunami of farm bankruptcies. Then came Trump’s doofus of an ag secretary, Sonny Perdue, who publicly insulted farmers by branding them “whiners” for daring to complain about policies causing them to lose income and their farms. So, as an “I love you” make-up gesture, Trump has been sending big bouquets of money to some of his beloved farmers. Our money. Lots of it — $28 billion so far in what he cynically (and comically) calls a “Market Facilitation Program,” otherwise known as a taxpayer bailout. But Trump Love turns out to be highly selective, with more than half of the government payments going to the biggest farm owners. The Agriculture Department initially announced a $125,000 limit on the amount any one farm could get, but every Trump deal seems to have a gimmick in it to give a special break to the slickest operators. The slickum in this deal is that assorted members of a family are allowed to claim that they’re owners of the same farm and thus get bailout bucks — even if they do no actual farming and live in New York City! One Missouri farm family, for example, got $2.8 million worth of subsidy love from Trump, and more than 80 families topped half-a-million in payments. Meanwhile, the great majority of farmers have gotten zilch from Donald the Dealmaker — and 80 percent of eligible grain farmers (the smaller producers most endangered by his bad policies) have received less than $5,000. So Trump’s “market facilitation” is squeezing the many who are most in need, while helping a few of the largest get even bigger.
    Just Who Got Trump's Farm Bailouts?
    Rich families cashed in on over half the bailout money set aside for farmers hurt by Trump’s trade policies... Donald Trump loves farmers. We know this because he says so. “Farmers, I LOVE YOU!” he declared in December. But he’s been “loving” them to death, with policies that are causing farm prices to tumble, miring our ag economy in the ditch and creating a rising tsunami of farm bankruptcies. 
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  • ALERT: Farmer "Threatens" USDA / Cannery Shutdown: No Crops to Can
    The US Pro Farm Crop Tour was shut down after a farmer "threatened" USDA officials.

    Steelworkers laid off due to lower demand for cans -- BECAUSE THERE ARE NO CROPS TO CAN!

    Major shifts are happening EVERY DAY as we enter the difficult growing seasons of the Grand Solar Minimum.

    Modern agriculture is unable to cope with the perfect cosmic storm of changes.
    #USDAFarmerFailure #GrandSolarMinimum #ClimateChaos #ArtificiallyCreatedFoodShortages #ThePreppersWereRight
    https://youtu.be/Qnu-REW_h9U
    Ice Age Farmer 8/22/19
    ALERT: Farmer "Threatens" USDA / Cannery Shutdown: No Crops to Can The US Pro Farm Crop Tour was shut down after a farmer "threatened" USDA officials. Steelworkers laid off due to lower demand for cans -- BECAUSE THERE ARE NO CROPS TO CAN! Major shifts are happening EVERY DAY as we enter the difficult growing seasons of the Grand Solar Minimum. Modern agriculture is unable to cope with the perfect cosmic storm of changes. #USDAFarmerFailure #GrandSolarMinimum #ClimateChaos #ArtificiallyCreatedFoodShortages #ThePreppersWereRight https://youtu.be/Qnu-REW_h9U Ice Age Farmer 8/22/19
    ALERT: Farmer "Threatens" USDA / Cannery Shutdown: No Crops to Can
    The US Pro Farm Crop Tour was shut down after a farmer "threatened" USDA officials. Steelworkers laid off due to lower demand for cans -- BECAUSE THERE ARE N...
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  • Farmers Hit Back as USDA Chief Sonny Perdue Mocks Those Harmed by Trump Trade War as 'Whiners'
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/08/13/farmers-hit-back-usda-chief-sonny-perdue-mocks-those-harmed-trump-trade-war-whiners
    Jake Johnson, staff writer

    Farmers facing record bankruptcies and collapsing incomes due to President Donald Trump's escalating trade war with China were not amused by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue's joke about their economic pain during an event in Minnesota last week.

    "I had a farmer tell me this in Pennsylvania," Perdue told an audience of thousands of farmers gathered in a barn near Morgan, Minnesota. "What do you call two farmers in a basement? A whine cellar."

    Some laughed at the agriculture secretary's joke, but other farmers booed and denounced Perdue's wisecrack as callous and tone-deaf mockery of the real hardship caused by the Trump administration's trade policies.

    "It was definitely not an appropriate thing to say," Gary Wertish, president of the Minnesota Farmers Union, told HuffPost on Monday. "It was very insensitive. It took everyone by surprise. He doesn't understand what farmers are dealing with, and he's the head of the Department of Agriculture. He's supposed to be working for farmers."

    Chris Lu โœ” @ChrisLu44
    Farm income is way down, bankruptcies are way up, and farmers are relying on government payments to make ends meet.

    So, of course, it’s the perfect time for Sonny Perdue to joke about “whining” farmers. #CantMakeThisUp https://www.newsweek.com/agriculture-secretary-joke-1453914
    7:55 PM - Aug 12, 2019

    Perdue's characterization of struggling farmers as "whiners" came after the Trump administration announced it will impose a 10 percent tariff on $300 billion of Chinese goods starting Sept. 1, a significant escalation in the ongoing trade war between the two global powers.

    China quickly retaliated by canceling all purchases of U.S. agricultural products, a move American Farm Bureau Federation president Zippy Duvall called "a body blow to thousands of farmers and ranchers who are already struggling to get by."

    With farmers suffering from his trade policies, Trump has attempted to tamp down backlash with targeted aid packages—but, according to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), most of the assistance has gone to wealthy farmers.

    Meanwhile, as HuffPost reported on Monday, "Net farm income in America has plunged by nearly half over the last five years from $123.4 billion in 2013 to $63 billion last year. It plummeted by 16 percent last year alone."

    Roger Johnson, president of the National Farmers Union, said last week that Trump's "strategy of constant escalation and antagonism" toward China has "made things worse."

    "It's really, really getting bad out here," added Bob Kuylen, a North Dakota farmer, in an interview with CNBC. "Trump is ruining our markets.
    Farmers Hit Back as USDA Chief Sonny Perdue Mocks Those Harmed by Trump Trade War as 'Whiners' https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/08/13/farmers-hit-back-usda-chief-sonny-perdue-mocks-those-harmed-trump-trade-war-whiners Jake Johnson, staff writer Farmers facing record bankruptcies and collapsing incomes due to President Donald Trump's escalating trade war with China were not amused by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue's joke about their economic pain during an event in Minnesota last week. "I had a farmer tell me this in Pennsylvania," Perdue told an audience of thousands of farmers gathered in a barn near Morgan, Minnesota. "What do you call two farmers in a basement? A whine cellar." Some laughed at the agriculture secretary's joke, but other farmers booed and denounced Perdue's wisecrack as callous and tone-deaf mockery of the real hardship caused by the Trump administration's trade policies. "It was definitely not an appropriate thing to say," Gary Wertish, president of the Minnesota Farmers Union, told HuffPost on Monday. "It was very insensitive. It took everyone by surprise. He doesn't understand what farmers are dealing with, and he's the head of the Department of Agriculture. He's supposed to be working for farmers." Chris Lu โœ” @ChrisLu44 Farm income is way down, bankruptcies are way up, and farmers are relying on government payments to make ends meet. So, of course, it’s the perfect time for Sonny Perdue to joke about “whining” farmers. #CantMakeThisUp https://www.newsweek.com/agriculture-secretary-joke-1453914 … 7:55 PM - Aug 12, 2019 Perdue's characterization of struggling farmers as "whiners" came after the Trump administration announced it will impose a 10 percent tariff on $300 billion of Chinese goods starting Sept. 1, a significant escalation in the ongoing trade war between the two global powers. China quickly retaliated by canceling all purchases of U.S. agricultural products, a move American Farm Bureau Federation president Zippy Duvall called "a body blow to thousands of farmers and ranchers who are already struggling to get by." With farmers suffering from his trade policies, Trump has attempted to tamp down backlash with targeted aid packages—but, according to the Environmental Working Group (EWG), most of the assistance has gone to wealthy farmers. Meanwhile, as HuffPost reported on Monday, "Net farm income in America has plunged by nearly half over the last five years from $123.4 billion in 2013 to $63 billion last year. It plummeted by 16 percent last year alone." Roger Johnson, president of the National Farmers Union, said last week that Trump's "strategy of constant escalation and antagonism" toward China has "made things worse." "It's really, really getting bad out here," added Bob Kuylen, a North Dakota farmer, in an interview with CNBC. "Trump is ruining our markets.
    Farmers Hit Back as USDA Chief Sonny Perdue Mocks Those Harmed by Trump Trade War as 'Whiners'
    "He doesn't understand what farmers are dealing with, and he's the head of the Department of Agriculture. He's supposed to be working for farmers."
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  • Stocks Plummet Over Trump Trade War With China
    DOW PLUMMETS OVER TRUMP TRADE WAR: Stocks have plunged today following media reports that Chinese firms have stopped buying U.S. agriculture products and that China is considering new tariffs on U.S. agricultural products that it has purchased after August 3.

    China also allowed its currency to devalue, an effort to boost exports amid a trade war driven by President Trump, who announced another round of tariffs on China last week.
    #News #NowThis #NowThisNews
    https://youtu.be/pnd9blSQRPU
    Now This News 8/5/19
    Stocks Plummet Over Trump Trade War With China DOW PLUMMETS OVER TRUMP TRADE WAR: Stocks have plunged today following media reports that Chinese firms have stopped buying U.S. agriculture products and that China is considering new tariffs on U.S. agricultural products that it has purchased after August 3. China also allowed its currency to devalue, an effort to boost exports amid a trade war driven by President Trump, who announced another round of tariffs on China last week. #News #NowThis #NowThisNews https://youtu.be/pnd9blSQRPU Now This News 8/5/19
    Stocks Plummet Over Trump Trade War With China | NowThis
    DOW PLUMMETS OVER TRUMP TRADE WAR: Stocks have plunged today following media reports that Chinese firms have stopped buying U.S. agriculture products and tha...
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  • Top Scientist Says He Quit USDA Because Trump Admin Tried to Bury His Study on Climate and Nutrition
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/08/05/top-scientist-says-he-quit-usda-because-trump-admin-tried-bury-his-study-climate-and
    Jessica Corbett, staff writer

    The exodus of federal scientists in the era of President Donald Trump continued Friday as 62-year-old plant physiologist Lewis Ziska left the U.S. Department of Agriculture "over the Trump administration's efforts to bury his groundbreaking study about how rice loses nutrients due to rising carbon dioxide in the atmosphere," Politico reported Monday.

    Ziska—who worked at USDA under five presidents, both Republicans and Democrats—charged in an interview with Politico that he left the department's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) because the USDA tried to block the public dissemination of his research on how the human-caused climate crisis's impact on rice could threaten the nutrition of 600 million people. The study, Politico reported, was internally cleared at the department and peer reviewed prior to its publication in the journal Science Advances last year.

    USDA, in a statement to the outlet, said that "this was a joint decision by ARS national program leaders—all career scientists—not to send out a press release on this paper" based on scientific disagreement, and the decisions involving the study weren't politically motivated.

    Ziska, however, said that "this isn't about the science. It's about something else, but it's not about the science."

    "You get the sense that things have changed, that this is not a place for you to be exploring things that don't agree with someone's political views," Ziska said about the current environment at the USDA. "That's so sad. I can't even begin to tell you how sad that is."

    Ziska's resignation comes after the departures of Rod Schoonover, a State Department official who claimed the administration blocked the submission of his report on the climate crisis and national security to a U.S. House committee, and Maria Caffrey, a National Park Service employee who wrote for The Guardian last month, "In February 2019, I lost my job because I was a climate scientist in a climate-denying administration."

    Politico previously reported on the Trump USDA refusing to publicize dozens of government-funded studies that warn about the climate emergency's consequences or to release a "multiyear plan that outlines how the department should help agriculture understand, adapt to, and minimize the effects" of the crisis.

    Timothy A. Wise @TimothyAWise
    Turns out the "swamp" that @realDonaldTrump wants to drain isn't lobbyists it's civil-servant scientists. #USDA relocation is as cynical as it gets. (Until tomorrow, brace yourself.) https://twitter.com/ceboudreau/status/1158371238236086272

    Catherine Boudreau โœ” @ceboudreau
    “You get the sense that things have changed, that this is not a place for you to be exploring things that don't agree with someone's political views.”

    A leading climate scientist tells @hbottemiller he is quitting USDA over its handling of his research https://politi.co/2yCQdYD
    9:17 AM - Aug 5, 2019

    But it's not just top-down censorship that's impacting U.S. government research on the climate, Ziska told Politico.

    The overriding fear among scientists within USDA, Ziska said, was that the administration would take an axe to the department's science budget, and research priorities that perhaps didn't align with the administration's agenda would be the first to go. (The Trump administration has repeatedly proposed significant cuts to ARS' budget, but Congress has so far largely kept funding flat.)

    Anything related to climate change was seen as extremely vulnerable, he said.

    "We were careful," he explained. "And then it got to the point where language started to change. No one wanted to say climate change, you would say climate uncertainty or you would say extreme events. Or you would use whatever euphemism was available to not draw attention."

    "There was a sense that if the science agreed with the politics, then the policymakers would consider it to be 'good science,' and if it didn’t agree with the politics, then it was something that was flawed and needed to be done again," Ziska added. "That was a sea change in how we viewed our role."

    Ziska told Politico that by politicizing climate science, the administration is jeopardizing the future of agriculture on a global scale, which could have devastating consequences for human health. As he put it:

    To ignore it. To just dismiss it and say 'oh that's political' ...I don't have the words to describe that. It's surreal. It feels like something out of a bad sci-fi movie.

    Congresswoman Chellie Pingree (D-Maine), a member of the U.S. House Agriculture Committee, was among those who responded to news of Ziska's resignation by calling out the Trump administration for "silencing our scientists."

    Chellie Pingree โœ” @chelliepingree
    Once again, the Trump admin is silencing our scientists. @USDA researchers study key topics like the devastating effects of climate change on agriculture—topics the Administration has repeatedly undermined at the expense of real data for farmers. This is a huge loss for USDA. https://twitter.com/politico/status/1158339385798082561

    POLITICO โœ” @politico
    A top climate scientist quit USDA, following others who say President Trump has politicized science https://politi.co/2KrJ4Qb
    8:14 AM - Aug 5, 2019

    The Politico interview was not the only report that cast a spotlight Monday on the Trump administration's impact on government-backed climate research.

    In a blog post for Scientific American, Jacob Carter, a research scientist for the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), wrote that "the Trump administration has suppressed, censored, and threatened to fire many of its experts for the work they do, or simply for discussing scientific information that is politically contentious. In some cases, the Trump administration's actions are driving experts out." He pointed to Schoonover and former Environmental Protection Agency official Betsy Southerland as examples.

    "Imagine the working culture for federal experts watching the Trump administration go on the offense against their own staff. What do you do to get your day-to-day work done? How do you continue to get your work funded? One option is to censor politically contentious words or phrases," Carter continued. "Self-censorship may not make headlines, but there is a lot of evidence that it's happening in the chilling environment the Trump administration has created for federal government experts."

    Environmental Protection Network @EnvProtectioNet
    @UCSJacob, @UCSUSA in @sciam: “We cannot afford to retreat from the science-based policies that help our nation respond effectively to complex challenges to public health, the environment and national security.” #ScienceNotSilence http://epn.news/qzl

    Government Scientists Are Censoring Themselves
    It may not make headlines, but there's a lot of evidence that it's happening in the chilling environment the Trump administration has created
    blogs.scientificamerican.com
    7:43 AM - Aug 5, 2019

    Carter referenced his organization's August 2018 survey of 63,000 scientific experts across 16 federal agencies which revealed, as Common Dreams reported at the time, that "as the Trump administration continues to brazenly attack national environmental regulations, it is also 'sidelining science' within agencies, with staffers reporting issues including 'censorship and self-censorship, political interference in scientists' work, low morale, decreased agency effectiveness, and dwindling resources.'"

    Next week, UCS and other partners will host a panel discussion in Albany, New York about the importance of federal science and how it can be safeguarded from political manipulation:

    Union of Concerned Scientists โœ” @UCSUSA
    When federal scientists can do their work and share it free from political manipulation, we are better able to tackle our most pressing challenges. Join UCS, @RepPaulTonko @CapSciNY @CleanHealthyNY and others for a panel discussion on how we can do that: https://www.facebook.com/events/383938368992712/
    10:00 AM - Aug 5, 2019
    Top Scientist Says He Quit USDA Because Trump Admin Tried to Bury His Study on Climate and Nutrition https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/08/05/top-scientist-says-he-quit-usda-because-trump-admin-tried-bury-his-study-climate-and Jessica Corbett, staff writer The exodus of federal scientists in the era of President Donald Trump continued Friday as 62-year-old plant physiologist Lewis Ziska left the U.S. Department of Agriculture "over the Trump administration's efforts to bury his groundbreaking study about how rice loses nutrients due to rising carbon dioxide in the atmosphere," Politico reported Monday. Ziska—who worked at USDA under five presidents, both Republicans and Democrats—charged in an interview with Politico that he left the department's Agricultural Research Service (ARS) because the USDA tried to block the public dissemination of his research on how the human-caused climate crisis's impact on rice could threaten the nutrition of 600 million people. The study, Politico reported, was internally cleared at the department and peer reviewed prior to its publication in the journal Science Advances last year. USDA, in a statement to the outlet, said that "this was a joint decision by ARS national program leaders—all career scientists—not to send out a press release on this paper" based on scientific disagreement, and the decisions involving the study weren't politically motivated. Ziska, however, said that "this isn't about the science. It's about something else, but it's not about the science." "You get the sense that things have changed, that this is not a place for you to be exploring things that don't agree with someone's political views," Ziska said about the current environment at the USDA. "That's so sad. I can't even begin to tell you how sad that is." Ziska's resignation comes after the departures of Rod Schoonover, a State Department official who claimed the administration blocked the submission of his report on the climate crisis and national security to a U.S. House committee, and Maria Caffrey, a National Park Service employee who wrote for The Guardian last month, "In February 2019, I lost my job because I was a climate scientist in a climate-denying administration." Politico previously reported on the Trump USDA refusing to publicize dozens of government-funded studies that warn about the climate emergency's consequences or to release a "multiyear plan that outlines how the department should help agriculture understand, adapt to, and minimize the effects" of the crisis. Timothy A. Wise @TimothyAWise Turns out the "swamp" that @realDonaldTrump wants to drain isn't lobbyists it's civil-servant scientists. #USDA relocation is as cynical as it gets. (Until tomorrow, brace yourself.) https://twitter.com/ceboudreau/status/1158371238236086272 … Catherine Boudreau โœ” @ceboudreau “You get the sense that things have changed, that this is not a place for you to be exploring things that don't agree with someone's political views.” A leading climate scientist tells @hbottemiller he is quitting USDA over its handling of his research https://politi.co/2yCQdYD 9:17 AM - Aug 5, 2019 But it's not just top-down censorship that's impacting U.S. government research on the climate, Ziska told Politico. The overriding fear among scientists within USDA, Ziska said, was that the administration would take an axe to the department's science budget, and research priorities that perhaps didn't align with the administration's agenda would be the first to go. (The Trump administration has repeatedly proposed significant cuts to ARS' budget, but Congress has so far largely kept funding flat.) Anything related to climate change was seen as extremely vulnerable, he said. "We were careful," he explained. "And then it got to the point where language started to change. No one wanted to say climate change, you would say climate uncertainty or you would say extreme events. Or you would use whatever euphemism was available to not draw attention." "There was a sense that if the science agreed with the politics, then the policymakers would consider it to be 'good science,' and if it didn’t agree with the politics, then it was something that was flawed and needed to be done again," Ziska added. "That was a sea change in how we viewed our role." Ziska told Politico that by politicizing climate science, the administration is jeopardizing the future of agriculture on a global scale, which could have devastating consequences for human health. As he put it: To ignore it. To just dismiss it and say 'oh that's political' ...I don't have the words to describe that. It's surreal. It feels like something out of a bad sci-fi movie. Congresswoman Chellie Pingree (D-Maine), a member of the U.S. House Agriculture Committee, was among those who responded to news of Ziska's resignation by calling out the Trump administration for "silencing our scientists." Chellie Pingree โœ” @chelliepingree Once again, the Trump admin is silencing our scientists. @USDA researchers study key topics like the devastating effects of climate change on agriculture—topics the Administration has repeatedly undermined at the expense of real data for farmers. This is a huge loss for USDA. https://twitter.com/politico/status/1158339385798082561 … POLITICO โœ” @politico A top climate scientist quit USDA, following others who say President Trump has politicized science https://politi.co/2KrJ4Qb 8:14 AM - Aug 5, 2019 The Politico interview was not the only report that cast a spotlight Monday on the Trump administration's impact on government-backed climate research. In a blog post for Scientific American, Jacob Carter, a research scientist for the Center for Science and Democracy at the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), wrote that "the Trump administration has suppressed, censored, and threatened to fire many of its experts for the work they do, or simply for discussing scientific information that is politically contentious. In some cases, the Trump administration's actions are driving experts out." He pointed to Schoonover and former Environmental Protection Agency official Betsy Southerland as examples. "Imagine the working culture for federal experts watching the Trump administration go on the offense against their own staff. What do you do to get your day-to-day work done? How do you continue to get your work funded? One option is to censor politically contentious words or phrases," Carter continued. "Self-censorship may not make headlines, but there is a lot of evidence that it's happening in the chilling environment the Trump administration has created for federal government experts." Environmental Protection Network @EnvProtectioNet @UCSJacob, @UCSUSA in @sciam: “We cannot afford to retreat from the science-based policies that help our nation respond effectively to complex challenges to public health, the environment and national security.” #ScienceNotSilence http://epn.news/qzl Government Scientists Are Censoring Themselves It may not make headlines, but there's a lot of evidence that it's happening in the chilling environment the Trump administration has created blogs.scientificamerican.com 7:43 AM - Aug 5, 2019 Carter referenced his organization's August 2018 survey of 63,000 scientific experts across 16 federal agencies which revealed, as Common Dreams reported at the time, that "as the Trump administration continues to brazenly attack national environmental regulations, it is also 'sidelining science' within agencies, with staffers reporting issues including 'censorship and self-censorship, political interference in scientists' work, low morale, decreased agency effectiveness, and dwindling resources.'" Next week, UCS and other partners will host a panel discussion in Albany, New York about the importance of federal science and how it can be safeguarded from political manipulation: Union of Concerned Scientists โœ” @UCSUSA When federal scientists can do their work and share it free from political manipulation, we are better able to tackle our most pressing challenges. Join UCS, @RepPaulTonko @CapSciNY @CleanHealthyNY and others for a panel discussion on how we can do that: https://www.facebook.com/events/383938368992712/ … 10:00 AM - Aug 5, 2019
    Top Scientist Says He Quit USDA Because Trump Admin Tried to Bury His Study on Climate and Nutrition
    Rep. Chellie Pingree tweeted, "Once again, the Trump admin is silencing our scientists."
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  • Restricting SNAP Benefits Could Hurt Millions of Americans—and Local Communities
    https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/08/03/restricting-snap-benefits-could-hurt-millions-americans-and-local-communities
    Cindy Leung, Julia Wolfson

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is trying to restrict access to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits.

    SNAP is the primary way the government helps low-income Americans put food on the table. According to the government’s own calculations, an estimated 3.1 million people could lose SNAP benefits, commonly referred to as food stamps, through a new proposal that would change some application procedures and eligibility requirements.

    We are nutrition and food policy researchers who have studied the effects of SNAP on the health and well-being of low-income Americans.

    Should this change go into effect, we believe millions of Americans, especially children, and local communities would suffer.

    Helping families and the economy

    SNAP helped 39.7 million Americans buy food in 2018.

    Federal research has found that the program reduces hunger, particularly in children – who make up 44% of its beneficiaries.

    Hunger and poor nutrition harm children’s health and hinder their development. Kids who don’t get enough to eat have more trouble at school and are more likely to experience mental health problems.

    One research team found that people who had access to SNAP as children earned higher incomes and were less likely to develop chronic diseases like diabetes once they grew up.

    “My eating habits have improved where I can eat more healthy than before,” a Massachusetts woman who had recently been approved for SNAP told us. “It is like night and day – the difference between surviving and not surviving.”

    SNAP benefits also ripple through the economy.

    They lead to money being spent at local stores, freeing up cash to pay rent and other bills.

    Every US$1 invested in SNAP generates $1.79 in economic activity, according to the USDA.

    Trying again and again

    The Trump administration has repeatedly attempted to slash SNAP and make it harder for people who qualify for benefits to get them.

    Its 2018, 2019 and 2020 budget proposals all called for cutting spending on food stamps by about 25%.

    The Trump administration also worked with Republicans in Congress to try to tighten eligibility requirements.

    Had this policy been implemented, all beneficiaries between the ages of 18 and 59 deemed “able-bodied” would have had to prove they were working at least 20 hours per week or were enrolled in school.

    According to government projections, some 1.2 million Americans would have eventually lost their benefits as a result.

    Congress, which would have needed to approve the change for it to take effect, rejected it in December 2018.

    The White House then sought to change work requirements through a new rule that has not yet taken effect.

    In July 2019, the Trump administration again sought to restrict access to food stamps without any input from Congress, this time by going through Temporary Assistance for Needy Families – a program that gives low-income families with children cash to cover childcare and other expenses.

    Currently, most states automatically enroll families in SNAP once they obtain TANF benefits. The new rule would prevent states from doing this.

    Even though 85% of TANF families also get SNAP benefits, the vast majority of them still live in poverty.

    The government is seeking comments from the public about this proposed change through September 23, 2019.

    Replacing food stamps with ‘harvest boxes’

    Other changes to SNAP could also take a toll.

    The Trump administration’s proposed budgets have also called for changing how the government helps low-income families get food they have trouble affording.

    Its 2019 budget proposal called for replacing half of SNAP benefits with what it called “harvest boxes” of nonperishable items like cereals, beans and canned goods.

    According to research we conducted with low-income Americans, 79% of SNAP participants opposed this proposal, with one of the primary reasons being not being able to choose their own foods.

    “People who are struggling are already demoralized,” a New Mexico woman who uses SNAP benefits told us. “Being able to make our own food decisions is something that keeps us feeling like human beings.”

    Congress rejected the concept but the White House included it again in its 2020 budget draft.

    Advocates for food aid fear that recent proposals to change how SNAP works would reduce the share of Americans who get these benefits by making it harder to qualify and enroll in the program. Should this major transformation ever occur, children and families won’t have access to critical benefits that help them avoid going hungry.

    Tracking the demand for food stamps

    Although the Trump administration has until now largely failed in its effort to cut SNAP spending, the number of people getting food stamps is already declining. This trend began during the Obama administration, in the aftermath of the Great Recession.

    Since the economy is doing well overall, the number of people on food assistance programs has fallen.

    The reason for the decline is that the number of people who are eligible for these benefits rises when the economy falters and falls when conditions improve.

    As a result, the government is spending less on food stamps without cutting the SNAP budget.

    Case in point, 7 million people have already left SNAP due to better economic stability. In parallel, federal spending on SNAP budget has dropped from $78 billion in 2013 to $64 billion in 2019.

    If the Trump administration wants to shrink SNAP, reduce costs and have fewer low-income Americans receive benefits, we believe that the best thing it can do is to keep working to improve the economy – particularly for low-income Americans, who have been reaping fewer benefits from the improving economy than others in recent years.
    Restricting SNAP Benefits Could Hurt Millions of Americans—and Local Communities https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/08/03/restricting-snap-benefits-could-hurt-millions-americans-and-local-communities Cindy Leung, Julia Wolfson The U.S. Department of Agriculture is trying to restrict access to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits. SNAP is the primary way the government helps low-income Americans put food on the table. According to the government’s own calculations, an estimated 3.1 million people could lose SNAP benefits, commonly referred to as food stamps, through a new proposal that would change some application procedures and eligibility requirements. We are nutrition and food policy researchers who have studied the effects of SNAP on the health and well-being of low-income Americans. Should this change go into effect, we believe millions of Americans, especially children, and local communities would suffer. Helping families and the economy SNAP helped 39.7 million Americans buy food in 2018. Federal research has found that the program reduces hunger, particularly in children – who make up 44% of its beneficiaries. Hunger and poor nutrition harm children’s health and hinder their development. Kids who don’t get enough to eat have more trouble at school and are more likely to experience mental health problems. One research team found that people who had access to SNAP as children earned higher incomes and were less likely to develop chronic diseases like diabetes once they grew up. “My eating habits have improved where I can eat more healthy than before,” a Massachusetts woman who had recently been approved for SNAP told us. “It is like night and day – the difference between surviving and not surviving.” SNAP benefits also ripple through the economy. They lead to money being spent at local stores, freeing up cash to pay rent and other bills. Every US$1 invested in SNAP generates $1.79 in economic activity, according to the USDA. Trying again and again The Trump administration has repeatedly attempted to slash SNAP and make it harder for people who qualify for benefits to get them. Its 2018, 2019 and 2020 budget proposals all called for cutting spending on food stamps by about 25%. The Trump administration also worked with Republicans in Congress to try to tighten eligibility requirements. Had this policy been implemented, all beneficiaries between the ages of 18 and 59 deemed “able-bodied” would have had to prove they were working at least 20 hours per week or were enrolled in school. According to government projections, some 1.2 million Americans would have eventually lost their benefits as a result. Congress, which would have needed to approve the change for it to take effect, rejected it in December 2018. The White House then sought to change work requirements through a new rule that has not yet taken effect. In July 2019, the Trump administration again sought to restrict access to food stamps without any input from Congress, this time by going through Temporary Assistance for Needy Families – a program that gives low-income families with children cash to cover childcare and other expenses. Currently, most states automatically enroll families in SNAP once they obtain TANF benefits. The new rule would prevent states from doing this. Even though 85% of TANF families also get SNAP benefits, the vast majority of them still live in poverty. The government is seeking comments from the public about this proposed change through September 23, 2019. Replacing food stamps with ‘harvest boxes’ Other changes to SNAP could also take a toll. The Trump administration’s proposed budgets have also called for changing how the government helps low-income families get food they have trouble affording. Its 2019 budget proposal called for replacing half of SNAP benefits with what it called “harvest boxes” of nonperishable items like cereals, beans and canned goods. According to research we conducted with low-income Americans, 79% of SNAP participants opposed this proposal, with one of the primary reasons being not being able to choose their own foods. “People who are struggling are already demoralized,” a New Mexico woman who uses SNAP benefits told us. “Being able to make our own food decisions is something that keeps us feeling like human beings.” Congress rejected the concept but the White House included it again in its 2020 budget draft. Advocates for food aid fear that recent proposals to change how SNAP works would reduce the share of Americans who get these benefits by making it harder to qualify and enroll in the program. Should this major transformation ever occur, children and families won’t have access to critical benefits that help them avoid going hungry. Tracking the demand for food stamps Although the Trump administration has until now largely failed in its effort to cut SNAP spending, the number of people getting food stamps is already declining. This trend began during the Obama administration, in the aftermath of the Great Recession. Since the economy is doing well overall, the number of people on food assistance programs has fallen. The reason for the decline is that the number of people who are eligible for these benefits rises when the economy falters and falls when conditions improve. As a result, the government is spending less on food stamps without cutting the SNAP budget. Case in point, 7 million people have already left SNAP due to better economic stability. In parallel, federal spending on SNAP budget has dropped from $78 billion in 2013 to $64 billion in 2019. If the Trump administration wants to shrink SNAP, reduce costs and have fewer low-income Americans receive benefits, we believe that the best thing it can do is to keep working to improve the economy – particularly for low-income Americans, who have been reaping fewer benefits from the improving economy than others in recent years.
    Restricting SNAP Benefits Could Hurt Millions of Americans—and Local Communities
    "People who are struggling are already demoralized. Being able to make our own food decisions is something that keeps us feeling like human beings.".. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is trying to restrict access to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits.
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