• Underground Dome House Of The Family Who Led Geese To Fly Home
    Paula and Bill Lishman spent many winters in a poorly-insulated A frame cabin before realizing they needed to go underground to use the earth’s energy to stay warm, so they knocked the top off a hill, dropped in ferro-cement domes and covered it up again with dirt.

    Thanks to skylights cut into every dome and the white-powdered marble that covers the interior, their earth-sheltered home is naturally well-lit despite being below the frost line.

    Fifteen feet below ground, the soil temperature remains about equal to the annual average temperature of the area’s surface air so earth-sheltered homes use sod’s constant temperature to stay warmer in winter and cooler in summer.

    Bill Lishman believed in rethinking not just the conventional home, but also how we live. He re-imagined his home’s refrigerator by building a round appliance that pops up out of the countertop so the heavier cool air stays inside when opened (via compressed air).

    In 1986, Bill Lishman began training Canada Geese to follow his ultralight aircraft and to "teach" the birds migration routes to avoid a threatened extinction.

    His work on "Operation Migration" brought him popular recognition with the 1996 movie Fly Away Home starring Jeff Daniels.

    Paula Lishman also believes in rethinking convention. In 1979 she began her fashion label reinventing the fur trade by using spun fur to knit her clothing
    #alternativehomes #domehome #KirstenDirksen
    https://youtu.be/RoGuvvzHY1A
    Kirsten Dirksen 8/17/19
    Underground Dome House Of The Family Who Led Geese To Fly Home Paula and Bill Lishman spent many winters in a poorly-insulated A frame cabin before realizing they needed to go underground to use the earth’s energy to stay warm, so they knocked the top off a hill, dropped in ferro-cement domes and covered it up again with dirt. Thanks to skylights cut into every dome and the white-powdered marble that covers the interior, their earth-sheltered home is naturally well-lit despite being below the frost line. Fifteen feet below ground, the soil temperature remains about equal to the annual average temperature of the area’s surface air so earth-sheltered homes use sod’s constant temperature to stay warmer in winter and cooler in summer. Bill Lishman believed in rethinking not just the conventional home, but also how we live. He re-imagined his home’s refrigerator by building a round appliance that pops up out of the countertop so the heavier cool air stays inside when opened (via compressed air). In 1986, Bill Lishman began training Canada Geese to follow his ultralight aircraft and to "teach" the birds migration routes to avoid a threatened extinction. His work on "Operation Migration" brought him popular recognition with the 1996 movie Fly Away Home starring Jeff Daniels. Paula Lishman also believes in rethinking convention. In 1979 she began her fashion label reinventing the fur trade by using spun fur to knit her clothing #alternativehomes #domehome #KirstenDirksen https://youtu.be/RoGuvvzHY1A Kirsten Dirksen 8/17/19
    Underground dome house of the family who led geese to fly home
    Paula and Bill Lishman spent many winters in a poorly-insulated A frame cabin before realizing they needed to go underground to use the earth’s energy to sta...
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  • Earthships: Self-Sustaining Homes for A Post-Apocalyptic Or More Sustainable Lifestyle?
    On the desert mesa of New Mexico, miles from the nearest town of Taos (pop. 5,700), Star-Wars-like shelters rise from the earth, half-buried and covered in adobe.

    Called “Earthships” - brainchild of architect Mike Reynolds in the 1970s- they’re nearly completely self-sufficient homes: no electrical grid, no water lines, no sewer.

    The Greater World Earthship Community, about 70 passive solar homes built from earth and trash on 633 acres, had a rough start; they were shut down as an illegal subdivision in 1997 and it took them 7 years to come to compliance.

    Though today, the county fully cooperates with Reynolds and his Earthship Biotecture operation to turn trash (tires, cans, glass bottles) into shelters and has even given them 2 acres to experiment with housing in anyway they like (they also provide their recycling).

    Sixteen years ago, Tom Duke had just finished over a decade on the pro volleyball circuit when he bought a bit of land here with his wife and began to build a tiny Earthship the size of a storage shed.

    When their first son was born they built their dream house on the property, a two bedroom that, like other Earthships, collects rainwater, uses its water four times (the plants in the indoor greenhouse filter the greywater) and even processes its own sewage.

    In this video, Tom takes us on a tour of his home, his original “Earthship survival pod”, the “nest” ($50,000 studio apartment), the “Simple Survival Earthship” (aimed mainly at the developing world), a custom home designed to feed a family of four (including a tilapia pond in the greenhouse) and the “BMW of Earthships”, the “Global" (aimed at the typical American family).
    Earthship Biotecture: earthship.com
    #earthship #kirstendirksen
    https://youtu.be/efI77fzBgvg
    Kirsten Dirksen 2014
    Earthships: Self-Sustaining Homes for A Post-Apocalyptic Or More Sustainable Lifestyle? On the desert mesa of New Mexico, miles from the nearest town of Taos (pop. 5,700), Star-Wars-like shelters rise from the earth, half-buried and covered in adobe. Called “Earthships” - brainchild of architect Mike Reynolds in the 1970s- they’re nearly completely self-sufficient homes: no electrical grid, no water lines, no sewer. The Greater World Earthship Community, about 70 passive solar homes built from earth and trash on 633 acres, had a rough start; they were shut down as an illegal subdivision in 1997 and it took them 7 years to come to compliance. Though today, the county fully cooperates with Reynolds and his Earthship Biotecture operation to turn trash (tires, cans, glass bottles) into shelters and has even given them 2 acres to experiment with housing in anyway they like (they also provide their recycling). Sixteen years ago, Tom Duke had just finished over a decade on the pro volleyball circuit when he bought a bit of land here with his wife and began to build a tiny Earthship the size of a storage shed. When their first son was born they built their dream house on the property, a two bedroom that, like other Earthships, collects rainwater, uses its water four times (the plants in the indoor greenhouse filter the greywater) and even processes its own sewage. In this video, Tom takes us on a tour of his home, his original “Earthship survival pod”, the “nest” ($50,000 studio apartment), the “Simple Survival Earthship” (aimed mainly at the developing world), a custom home designed to feed a family of four (including a tilapia pond in the greenhouse) and the “BMW of Earthships”, the “Global" (aimed at the typical American family). Earthship Biotecture: earthship.com #earthship #kirstendirksen https://youtu.be/efI77fzBgvg Kirsten Dirksen 2014
    Earthships: self-sustaining homes for a post-apocalyptic land?
    On the desert mesa of New Mexico, miles from the nearest town of Taos (pop. 5,700), Star-Wars-like shelters rise from the earth, half-buried and covered in a...
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