• Are you a diverse voice?
    If so, Zizzle Lit wants your work for their 2020 special edition.

    Visit https://buff.ly/30vk8xx to know more.

    #ArtHut #CallForSubmissions #Storytelling #amwriting #Writingcommunity
    Are you a diverse voice? If so, Zizzle Lit wants your work for their 2020 special edition. Visit https://buff.ly/30vk8xx to know more. #ArtHut #CallForSubmissions #Storytelling #amwriting #Writingcommunity
    Arthut - Call for Submissons - Zizzle wants Diverse Voices for their special edition in 2020
    Zizzle Literary is a literary organization that aims to bring parents and kids together to foster a lifelong love of reading....
    BUFF.LY
    2
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Are you a diverse voice?
    If so, Zizzle Lit wants your work for their 2020 special edition.

    Visit https://buff.ly/30vk8xx to know more.

    #ArtHut #CallForSubmissions #Storytelling #amwriting #Writingcommunity
    Are you a diverse voice? If so, Zizzle Lit wants your work for their 2020 special edition. Visit https://buff.ly/30vk8xx to know more. #ArtHut #CallForSubmissions #Storytelling #amwriting #Writingcommunity
    Arthut - Call for Submissons - Zizzle wants Diverse Voices for their special edition in 2020
    Zizzle Literary is a literary organization that aims to bring parents and kids together to foster a lifelong love of reading....
    BUFF.LY
    2
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • The way most people see teenage sex these days.
    It makes once scared whether or not there will be any conduct to it in the future.
    Dominique Mthembu tells a tale in her #poem
    Visit via https://buff.ly/2F5YV5e

    #ArtHut #Poetry #Storytelling #Sex #Teenagelife
    The way most people see teenage sex these days. It makes once scared whether or not there will be any conduct to it in the future. Dominique Mthembu tells a tale in her #poem Visit via https://buff.ly/2F5YV5e #ArtHut #Poetry #Storytelling #Sex #Teenagelife
    Arthut - HE LEFT COZ I WAS A VIRGIN - Poetry by Dominique Mthembu
    He came to us He looked extremely handsome you know My idea of a boyfriend. He greets the group but then looks...
    BUFF.LY
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • 'A Model of Hope for the World': 25 Years After Rwandan Genocide, New Film Shows Journey Toward Justice and Healing
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/04/07/model-hope-world-25-years-after-rwandan-genocide-new-film-shows-journey-toward
    Jessica Corbett, staff writer

    As the world marks the 25th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide on Sunday, a forthcoming documentary sheds light on the survivors and perpetrators' long journey toward justice and healing.

    On April 7, 1994, members of Rwanda's dominant Hutu ethnic group launched a 100-day killing spree targeting Tutsis, an ethnic minority in the landlocked East African country.

    The international community stood by while an estimated 800,000 people or more were slaughtered—leaving 95,000 children without parents.

    Gadi Habumugisha, Bizimana Jean, and Mussa Uwitonze were orphaned by the massacre.

    They are now professional photographers and fellows at The GroundTruth Project, the Boston-based nonprofit media organization behind the new film, entitled Camera Kids.

    Watch the trailer: (https://vimeo.com/328732815)

    After the genocide ended, Gadi, Bizimana, and Mussa were raised by American humanitarian Rosamond Carr at the Imbabazi Orphanage in Mutura, Rwanda.

    There, they received disposable Fuji cameras from Through the Eyes of Children, a nonprofit started in 2000 that holds photography workshops to teach vulnerable children how to capture and share their stories with the world.

    The 19 orphans in Rwanda who participated in the nonprofit's first workshops became known as "the camera kids."

    Today, the three men featured in the documentary, who are now in their late 20s, are all project coordinators for Through the Eyes of Children.

    "When we were kids, [Carr] used to tell us that we have to share with others what we have," Bizimana told TIME. "This is the heritage she gave us. Giving other kids photography is doing what we promised her."

    Storytelling through a camera lens, Mussa explains in the film, "that can be a like a medicine. That can heal someone."

    "When I learned photography, that's when I was able to express myself," Gadi reveals. "I realized that I matter."

    The GroundTruth Project's film, due out in 2020, follows the trio as they explore the genocide that claimed their parents' lives by interviewing and photographing those who survived, those responsible for the mass killing, and their families.

    On Friday, PBS NewsHour aired a segment featuring clips from the film.

    "I met this couple," says Gadi. "One is a son of a perpetrator and the other one is a survivor.

    From killing each other, forgiving each other, reuniting with each other, living with each other, and now marrying, it's a sign of how far things have come."

    Watch the segment: (https://youtu.be/hukaR6QjXfQ)

    In a director's statement published by The GroundTruth Project, American filmmaker Beth Murphy emphasized the lessons about hatred and peace that the global community can take from the Rwandan genocide—and, hopefully, Camera Kids.

    "It is impossible to study this history without drawing parallels to what's happening in our world today," Murphy wrote.

    "With the rise of far-right populism around the world, white nationalists throughout the U.S. and all Western countries are using the same fear-stoking language Rwanda's genocide perpetrators used in the months and years leading up to the 1994 genocide. That's chilling."

    "When Rwanda emerged from its 100 days of darkness, forgiveness and reconciliation programs were not only encouraged, but also enforced," she noted.

    "As people had been taught how to hate, now they were taught how to make peace. Twenty-five years after the genocide, the country has found a way to balance justice and healing, vengeance and forgiveness, and has become a model of hope for the world."
    'A Model of Hope for the World': 25 Years After Rwandan Genocide, New Film Shows Journey Toward Justice and Healing https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/04/07/model-hope-world-25-years-after-rwandan-genocide-new-film-shows-journey-toward Jessica Corbett, staff writer As the world marks the 25th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide on Sunday, a forthcoming documentary sheds light on the survivors and perpetrators' long journey toward justice and healing. On April 7, 1994, members of Rwanda's dominant Hutu ethnic group launched a 100-day killing spree targeting Tutsis, an ethnic minority in the landlocked East African country. The international community stood by while an estimated 800,000 people or more were slaughtered—leaving 95,000 children without parents. Gadi Habumugisha, Bizimana Jean, and Mussa Uwitonze were orphaned by the massacre. They are now professional photographers and fellows at The GroundTruth Project, the Boston-based nonprofit media organization behind the new film, entitled Camera Kids. Watch the trailer: (https://vimeo.com/328732815) After the genocide ended, Gadi, Bizimana, and Mussa were raised by American humanitarian Rosamond Carr at the Imbabazi Orphanage in Mutura, Rwanda. There, they received disposable Fuji cameras from Through the Eyes of Children, a nonprofit started in 2000 that holds photography workshops to teach vulnerable children how to capture and share their stories with the world. The 19 orphans in Rwanda who participated in the nonprofit's first workshops became known as "the camera kids." Today, the three men featured in the documentary, who are now in their late 20s, are all project coordinators for Through the Eyes of Children. "When we were kids, [Carr] used to tell us that we have to share with others what we have," Bizimana told TIME. "This is the heritage she gave us. Giving other kids photography is doing what we promised her." Storytelling through a camera lens, Mussa explains in the film, "that can be a like a medicine. That can heal someone." "When I learned photography, that's when I was able to express myself," Gadi reveals. "I realized that I matter." The GroundTruth Project's film, due out in 2020, follows the trio as they explore the genocide that claimed their parents' lives by interviewing and photographing those who survived, those responsible for the mass killing, and their families. On Friday, PBS NewsHour aired a segment featuring clips from the film. "I met this couple," says Gadi. "One is a son of a perpetrator and the other one is a survivor. From killing each other, forgiving each other, reuniting with each other, living with each other, and now marrying, it's a sign of how far things have come." Watch the segment: (https://youtu.be/hukaR6QjXfQ) In a director's statement published by The GroundTruth Project, American filmmaker Beth Murphy emphasized the lessons about hatred and peace that the global community can take from the Rwandan genocide—and, hopefully, Camera Kids. "It is impossible to study this history without drawing parallels to what's happening in our world today," Murphy wrote. "With the rise of far-right populism around the world, white nationalists throughout the U.S. and all Western countries are using the same fear-stoking language Rwanda's genocide perpetrators used in the months and years leading up to the 1994 genocide. That's chilling." "When Rwanda emerged from its 100 days of darkness, forgiveness and reconciliation programs were not only encouraged, but also enforced," she noted. "As people had been taught how to hate, now they were taught how to make peace. Twenty-five years after the genocide, the country has found a way to balance justice and healing, vengeance and forgiveness, and has become a model of hope for the world."
    'A Model of Hope for the World': 25 Years After Rwandan Genocide, New Film Shows Journey Toward Justice and Healing
    Three orphans turned professional photographers interview survivors and perpetrators of the 100-day killing spree that left 800,000+ dead
    WWW.COMMONDREAMS.ORG
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Cyberpunk: The Human Condition amid High-tech Alienation and Urban Dystopia
    https://desultoryheroics.com/2019/04/07/cyberpunk-the-human-condition-amid-high-tech-alienation-and-urban-dystopia/
    Posted By Luther Blissett By Raymond Lam: BuddhistDoor 4/7/19

    I love the seashore and the countryside, but I have spent most of my life in cities, with little to no time spent in the country.

    I grew up in Brisbane, Australia (which, despite its beauty and vibrant coffee culture, is hardly a skyscraper metropolis) and have spent a good deal of time in Hong Kong.

    Over the years I have visited Shanghai, Tokyo, and Seoul—cities that have long inspired novelists and artists in cyberpunk circles.

    Cyberpunk features “technologized” cities with endless skyscrapers shimmering in an ocean of neon lights and elevated railways.

    These cityscapes are often bathed in darkness, shadow, and rain.

    More often than not, the protagonists of these stories are lone-wolf types, running through grungy alleys and estranged from wider society.

    As a genre of writing, film, and animation, the dystopian cyberpunk imagination has been immensely influential in both Asian and Western pop culture, exemplified by the Blade Runner movies, The Matrix franchise, and the Japanese anime Ghost in the Shell.

    To many social commentators, cyberpunk carries eerie reminders of certain characteristics of urban living today—an endless feed of information, insecurity, and distractions through the Internet and social media, the press and media serving as distractions or brainwashing rather than useful information, and social alienation and unfulfilling work.

    In these activities is an almost gleeful dismissiveness of the need to reflect on human nature and what it means to be a human being: a key concern of religions and philosophical schools through the ages.

    As Buddhistdoor Global columnist Paola Di Maio notes about our headlong trajectory into developing communication between human beings and AI: “Excited at the prospect of scientific advances, researchers seem to ignore that enhanced cognition comes with enhanced responsibility, maturity, and responsible decision-making abilities.”

    This is the key concern and, as it happens, the idea of human interface with computers or “mind technologies” is about as cyberpunk as it gets.

    There are far more informed writers who have unpacked the themes of cyberpunk exhaustively, but I find this description particularly useful for grasping the general aesthetic and spirit.

    This is from an essay by Lawrence Person: “Classic cyberpunk characters were marginalized, alienated loners who lived on the edge of society in generally dystopic futures where daily life was impacted by rapid technological change, an ubiquitous datasphere of computerized information, and invasive modification of the human body.” (Slashdot)

    Surely many of these themes sound familiar?

    The eminent science fiction writer J. G. Ballard (1930–2009) defied assumptions about traditional storytelling and sought to upend the archetypes that were assumed to be universal, saying that he wanted a storytelling style that possessed “more psycho-literary ideas, more meta-biological and meta-chemical concepts, private time systems, synthetic psychologies and space-times, more of the somber half-worlds one glimpses in the paintings of schizophrenics.” (Ballard 2017, 103)

    Most interestingly, Ballard criticized the “external” emphasis of so much science fiction of his day (such as on space travel), declaring: “The biggest developments of the immediate future will take place, not on the Moon or Mars, but on Earth, and it is inner space, not outer, that needs to be explored. The only truly alien planet is Earth.” (Ballard 2017, 103)

    My opinion is that good cyberpunk is itself a kind of literary expression of contemporary inner preoccupations and concerns.

    Take the notion of loneliness, for example.

    Some good research has been done about urban life and its correlation with loneliness, but the results are ambiguous.

    One study found that urban life is undoubtedly more stressful than rural life (and has been so since the Industrial Revolution), yet how lonely one feels is a very difficult thing to measure.

    If we are to take seriously Ballard’s notion that the best kind of science fiction is about inner space, then perhaps we have also been distracted by the neon cityscapes of gritty cyberpunk metropolises.

    The interesting stuff is not happening in an action-packed helipad gunfight with a hypersonic jet on top of a tower owned by a futuristic robotics corporation.

    It is happening in the neurotic mind of one of that corporation’s low-level office workers, humiliated in public through a thoughtless social media post by her supervisor, who himself seeks distraction from his instantly replaceable managerial role by interfacing his brain with a computer’s pornographic VR program.

    It is not just about cybernetics and the development of androids, but how society changes as a result of them.

    I like to think that, perhaps one day in the future, when meditation practice centers are hidden away in glass and metal skyscrapers—some of them already are in the worlds biggest cities—and temples of traditional Asian design are surrounded by looming corporate structures, these loci of spiritual meaning and truly human work will have helped to fortify the inner worlds of these cities’ denizens against the darker side of cyberpunk.

    Ballard was right. The true struggle for meaning and dignity is more often on the inside, even in a society dominated by neon, nightfall, and neuro-computers.

    References

    Ballard, J. G. 2017. “Which way to inner space?” In Science Fiction Criticism: An Anthology of Essential Writings. Edited by Rob Latham. London and New York: Bloomsbury.
    Cyberpunk: The Human Condition amid High-tech Alienation and Urban Dystopia https://desultoryheroics.com/2019/04/07/cyberpunk-the-human-condition-amid-high-tech-alienation-and-urban-dystopia/ Posted By Luther Blissett By Raymond Lam: BuddhistDoor 4/7/19 I love the seashore and the countryside, but I have spent most of my life in cities, with little to no time spent in the country. I grew up in Brisbane, Australia (which, despite its beauty and vibrant coffee culture, is hardly a skyscraper metropolis) and have spent a good deal of time in Hong Kong. Over the years I have visited Shanghai, Tokyo, and Seoul—cities that have long inspired novelists and artists in cyberpunk circles. Cyberpunk features “technologized” cities with endless skyscrapers shimmering in an ocean of neon lights and elevated railways. These cityscapes are often bathed in darkness, shadow, and rain. More often than not, the protagonists of these stories are lone-wolf types, running through grungy alleys and estranged from wider society. As a genre of writing, film, and animation, the dystopian cyberpunk imagination has been immensely influential in both Asian and Western pop culture, exemplified by the Blade Runner movies, The Matrix franchise, and the Japanese anime Ghost in the Shell. To many social commentators, cyberpunk carries eerie reminders of certain characteristics of urban living today—an endless feed of information, insecurity, and distractions through the Internet and social media, the press and media serving as distractions or brainwashing rather than useful information, and social alienation and unfulfilling work. In these activities is an almost gleeful dismissiveness of the need to reflect on human nature and what it means to be a human being: a key concern of religions and philosophical schools through the ages. As Buddhistdoor Global columnist Paola Di Maio notes about our headlong trajectory into developing communication between human beings and AI: “Excited at the prospect of scientific advances, researchers seem to ignore that enhanced cognition comes with enhanced responsibility, maturity, and responsible decision-making abilities.” This is the key concern and, as it happens, the idea of human interface with computers or “mind technologies” is about as cyberpunk as it gets. There are far more informed writers who have unpacked the themes of cyberpunk exhaustively, but I find this description particularly useful for grasping the general aesthetic and spirit. This is from an essay by Lawrence Person: “Classic cyberpunk characters were marginalized, alienated loners who lived on the edge of society in generally dystopic futures where daily life was impacted by rapid technological change, an ubiquitous datasphere of computerized information, and invasive modification of the human body.” (Slashdot) Surely many of these themes sound familiar? The eminent science fiction writer J. G. Ballard (1930–2009) defied assumptions about traditional storytelling and sought to upend the archetypes that were assumed to be universal, saying that he wanted a storytelling style that possessed “more psycho-literary ideas, more meta-biological and meta-chemical concepts, private time systems, synthetic psychologies and space-times, more of the somber half-worlds one glimpses in the paintings of schizophrenics.” (Ballard 2017, 103) Most interestingly, Ballard criticized the “external” emphasis of so much science fiction of his day (such as on space travel), declaring: “The biggest developments of the immediate future will take place, not on the Moon or Mars, but on Earth, and it is inner space, not outer, that needs to be explored. The only truly alien planet is Earth.” (Ballard 2017, 103) My opinion is that good cyberpunk is itself a kind of literary expression of contemporary inner preoccupations and concerns. Take the notion of loneliness, for example. Some good research has been done about urban life and its correlation with loneliness, but the results are ambiguous. One study found that urban life is undoubtedly more stressful than rural life (and has been so since the Industrial Revolution), yet how lonely one feels is a very difficult thing to measure. If we are to take seriously Ballard’s notion that the best kind of science fiction is about inner space, then perhaps we have also been distracted by the neon cityscapes of gritty cyberpunk metropolises. The interesting stuff is not happening in an action-packed helipad gunfight with a hypersonic jet on top of a tower owned by a futuristic robotics corporation. It is happening in the neurotic mind of one of that corporation’s low-level office workers, humiliated in public through a thoughtless social media post by her supervisor, who himself seeks distraction from his instantly replaceable managerial role by interfacing his brain with a computer’s pornographic VR program. It is not just about cybernetics and the development of androids, but how society changes as a result of them. I like to think that, perhaps one day in the future, when meditation practice centers are hidden away in glass and metal skyscrapers—some of them already are in the worlds biggest cities—and temples of traditional Asian design are surrounded by looming corporate structures, these loci of spiritual meaning and truly human work will have helped to fortify the inner worlds of these cities’ denizens against the darker side of cyberpunk. Ballard was right. The true struggle for meaning and dignity is more often on the inside, even in a society dominated by neon, nightfall, and neuro-computers. References Ballard, J. G. 2017. “Which way to inner space?” In Science Fiction Criticism: An Anthology of Essential Writings. Edited by Rob Latham. London and New York: Bloomsbury.

    By Raymond Lam

    Source: BuddhistDoor.net

    I love the seashore and the countryside, but I have spent most of my life in cities, with little to no time spent in the country. I grew up in Brisbane, Australia (which, despite its beauty and vibrant coffee culture, is hardly a skyscraper metropolis) and have spent a good deal of time in Hong Kong. Over the years I have visited Shanghai, Tokyo, and Seoul—cities that have long inspired novelists and artists in cyberpunk circles.

    Cyberpunk features “technologized” cities with endless skyscrapers shimmering in an ocean of neon lights and elevated railways. These cityscapes are often bathed in darkness, shadow, and rain. More often than not, the protagonists of these stories are lone-wolf types, running through grungy alleys and estranged from wider society. As a genre of writing, film, and animation, the dystopian cyberpunk imagination has been immensely influential in both Asian and Western pop culture, exemplified by the Blade Runner movies, The Matrix franchise, and the Japanese anime Ghost in the Shell.

    To many social commentators, cyberpunk carries eerie reminders of certain characteristics of urban living today—an endless feed of information, insecurity, and distractions through the Internet and social media, the press and media serving as distractions or brainwashing rather than useful information, and social alienation and unfulfilling work. In these activities is an almost gleeful dismissiveness of the need to reflect on human nature and what it means to be a human being: a key concern of religions and philosophical schools through the ages.

    As Buddhistdoor Global columnist Paola Di Maio notes about our headlong trajectory into developing communication between human beings and AI: “Excited at the prospect of scientific advances, researchers seem to ignore that enhanced cognition comes with enhanced responsibility, maturity, and responsible decision-making abilities.” This is the key concern and, as it happens, the idea of human interface with computers or “mind technologies” is about as cyberpunk as it gets.

    There are far more informed writers who have unpacked the themes of cyberpunk exhaustively, but I find this description particularly useful for grasping the general aesthetic and spirit. This is from an essay by Lawrence Person: “Classic cyberpunk characters were marginalized, alienated loners who lived on the edge of society in generally dystopic futures where daily life was impacted by rapid technological change, an ubiquitous datasphere of computerized information, and invasive modification of the human body.” (Slashdot.org) Surely many of these themes sound familiar?

    The eminent science fiction writer J. G. Ballard (1930–2009) defied assumptions about traditional storytelling and sought to upend the archetypes that were assumed to be universal, saying that he wanted a storytelling style that possessed “more psycho-literary ideas, more meta-biological and meta-chemical concepts, private time systems, synthetic psychologies and space-times, more of the sombre half-worlds one glimpses in the paintings of schizophrenics.” (Ballard 2017, 103) Most interestingly, Ballard criticized the “external” emphasis of so much science fiction of his day (such as on space travel), declaring: “The biggest developments of the immediate future will take place, not on the Moon or Mars, but on Earth, and it is inner space, not outer, that needs to be explored. The only truly alien planet is Earth.” (Ballard 2017, 103)

    My opinion is that good cyberpunk is itself a kind of literary expression of contemporary inner preoccupations and concerns. Take the notion of loneliness, for example. Some good research has been done about urban life and its correlation with loneliness, but the results are ambiguous. One study found that urban life is undoubtedly more stressful than rural life (and has been so since the Industrial Revolution), yet how lonely one feels is a very difficult thing to measure. If we are to take seriously Ballard’s notion that the best kind of science fiction is about inner space, then perhaps we have also been distracted by the neon cityscapes of gritty cyberpunk metropolises.

    The interesting stuff is not happening in an action-packed helipad gunfight with a hypersonic jet on top of a tower owned by a futuristic robotics corporation. It is happening in the neurotic mind of one of that corporation’s low-level office workers, humiliated in public through a thoughtless social media post by her supervisor, who himself seeks distraction from his instantly replaceable managerial role by interfacing his brain with a computer’s pornographic VR program. It is not just about cybernetics and the development of androids, but how society changes as a result of them.

    I like to think that, perhaps one day in the future, when meditation practice centers are hidden away in glass and metal skyscrapers—some of them already are in the worlds biggest cities—and temples of traditional Asian design are surrounded by looming corporate structures, these loci of spiritual meaning and truly human work will have helped to fortify the inner worlds of these cities’ denizens against the darker side of cyberpunk. Ballard was right. The true struggle for meaning and dignity is more often on the inside, even in a society dominated by neon, nightfall, and neuro-computers.

    References

    Ballard, J. G. 2017. “Which way to inner space?” In Science Fiction Criticism: An Anthology of Essential Writings. Edited by Rob Latham. London and New York: Bloomsbury.

    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Introducing Pixar SparkShorts (01:02)
    Disney Pixar 771
    Introducing Pixar SparkShorts, an experimental storytelling initiative that welcomes new creative voices at Pixar Animation Studios to share their stories

    https://watch.permission.io/s/ZgTZhTkZ?referralCode=X3AE54
    Introducing Pixar SparkShorts (01:02) Disney Pixar 771 Introducing Pixar SparkShorts, an experimental storytelling initiative that welcomes new creative voices at Pixar Animation Studios to share their stories https://watch.permission.io/s/ZgTZhTkZ?referralCode=X3AE54
    Introducing Pixar SparkShorts
    Introducing Pixar SparkShorts, an experimental storytelling initiative that welcomes new creative voices at Pixar Animation Studios to share their stories
    WATCH.PERMISSION.IO
    2
    0 Comments 0 Shares

No results to show

No results to show

No results to show

No results to show

No results to show

Sponsored

MinePi Ad 14-August-2019

The First Digital Currency You Can Mine On Your Phone. Start earning cryptocurrency today with our free, energy-light mobile app.