• https://mises.org/wire/does-boom-bust-cycle-ever-result-commodity-money
    https://mises.org/wire/does-boom-bust-cycle-ever-result-commodity-money
    Does the Boom-Bust Cycle Ever Result from Commodity Money? | Frank Shostak
    Following the Austrian Business Cycle Theory (ABCT), the boom-bust cycle emerges in response to a deviation in the market interest rate from the natural interest rate, or the equilibrium interest rate.
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  • WARNING: The Upcoming Food Crisis Be Ready 2019 (Video)

    NIKOS HILADAKIS · 12 JUL. 2019

    WARNING: The Coming Food Crisis Be Ready 2019

    Overpopulation and Lack of Food

    Overpopulation is a somewhat relative concept. Of course it is associated with very large populations, but not always. Even a region with a large population does not necessarily have a problem of overpopulation, since it can support its inhabitants. On the other hand, if a place can not feed its inhabitants, there is a problem of overpopulation without necessarily having a huge number of people. So overpopulation has to do with the balance between a population and the availability of the goods necessary for their dignified living.

    The sudden population influx usually follows food shortages. The problem of hunger is of course related to food production, but not always. In fact, if there are now hungry areas in the world, this is partly due to the inequality that exists. Countries like the European have such a surplus of food to subsidize their farmers to bury them! At the same time elsewhere, they are hungry.

    The fact that they are hungry in some countries has to do even with the choices they made (or imposed on) their cultivations. Many have turned to non-eating crops such as coffee and cocoa. As long as these species sold there was no problem. But when global demand declined, they were left with tons of coffee and cocoa in their warehouses. And as they are not eaten, hungry hit the door. Some do not care about it. In neighboring Turkey, for example, they see the terrifying increase in the population as a force: We are many and that makes us strong, they say. This is true if one thinks of a nation with Stepa's logic, where as long as the earth has no end and limit, people do not. At the door of Europe, however, things are different.

    Many blame the religions for the excessive population growth of the Earth. Particularly certain doctrines of Christianity which, in fact, discourage birth control. The fact is that the same and even more conservative view is given by most - and more massive - religions of the East (eg, Hinduism). In the "Christian" countries, however, the birth rate is controlled. The problem lies with the East. Probably overpopulation is not a problem that religions create, though in Asia, they certainly reinforce it.

    Interestingly, the religions that prevail in areas where overpopulation has long been a problem, Eastern religions constitute or even impose vegetarianism. They are, of course, referring to metaphysical concerns about it. Whatever it is, it is a wise choice. Today we know that meat-based diet is an energy waste of natural resources. The only diet that can provide food for huge populations is vegetarian.

    Part of the problem is that there are no solutions that are not idealistic. They usually require a mood for co-operation, solidarity, ideals that are species in deficiency in human societies. There are also realistic solutions, but, realism is hard and its choice is easy only by those who are not directly affected. But there are also some "keys" that could lead to "magical" solutions.

    Continue here:

    https://terrapapers.com/yperlithysmos-ke-ellipsi-t...

    Decode the Agenda 2030

    Agenda 2030 - The Protocols of the New Order of Things

    UN agenda 2030, is a plan for the worldwide enslavement of humanity under the boot of the Corporate Eminent. The 193 UN member states reached agreement on the new development agenda for the next 15 years. The agreement refers to the eradication of poverty and hunger, the safeguarding of gender equality, the improvement of survival standards and the urgent need to take measures to combat climate change.

    State representatives agreed late on Sunday evening 03/08/2015 setting 17 goals with 169 specific targets on poverty "in all aspects and everywhere" to ensure quality education and adequate energy and protection environment. The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda will be voted by the UN shortly before the annual meeting of world leaders on Tuesday, September 3rd. Secretary General Ban Guy-Mun said the deal is "to secure peace and prosperity by focusing on cooperation with people and the environment"

    We translated and decoded 17 items on Agenda 2030.

    This document does not describe anything less than a global government buying every nation across the globe. The "goals" of this document are nothing more than code words for the company with the fascist tyrannical agenda that intends to imprison the civilized human beings of the cement cities, into a dilapidated cycle of poverty, poverty and starvation while enriching the world's most powerful global companies such as Monsanto and DuPont. All the articles we mention exist in terrapapers.com and are constantly on the go, looking for more complete information and not hiding behind your finger. It is absolutely clear the plans of the Herpetological Subordinates as well as what actions are needed on the part of man - no matter how he does - in order not to carry out these plans.

    Objective 1) The end of poverty in all its forms everywhere

    Translation: Put everyone in social welfare, food vouchers, housing subsidies and brochures that make them slaves obedient to the world government. Never allow people upward mobility to help themselves. Instead, it will be taught mass victimization and obedience to a government that provides a minimum monthly "allowance" for commodity money such as food and medicine. The tag will be called "eradication of poverty" and will ensure that human beings are fed as much as they can, crawl and work.

    At least two dozen microbiologists around the world have died violently in recent years. Surprisingly, some of them worked in the DNA sequence. The best known was Dr. David Kelly who died in July 2003. He was working for Mossad, Kelly orchestrated the apostasy of the Russian microbiologist Vladimir Pasechnik, who was working on a biological weapon capable of destroying one-third of the world's population . In October 2004, Dmtry Lvov, head of the Russian Institute of Virology, said that up to a billion people worldwide could die during the next pandemic.

    It seems that the human flock is going to be killed in a spectacular way. For whatever reason, dead microbiologists did not go along with the program. In essence, what the US is trying to achieve is to impose on the planet its own policies on the production, export and import of products that will have effect vis-à-vis the national laws of each country. Large multinationals will therefore be able to draw in the courts any other country on the planet in which they will operate, and which votes national laws contrary to their interests. Although this outlook is the most frightening of all, the benefits of the agreement do not stop there.

    Continue here:

    https://terrapapers.com/apododikopiisi-tis-atzenta...

    RECIPIENT GROUP OF CHILDREN
    www.nikosxeiladakis.gr

    http://nikosxeiladakis.gr/%cf%80%cf%81%ce%bf%ce%b5%ce%b9%ce%b4%ce%bf%cf%80%ce%bf%ce%b9%ce%b7%cf%83%ce%b7-%ce%b7-%ce%b5%cf%80%ce%b5%cf%81%cf%87%cf%8c%ce%bc%ce%b5%ce%bd%ce%b7-%ce%ba%cf%81%ce%af%cf%83%ce%b7-%cf%84%cf%81%ce%bf/
    WARNING: The Upcoming Food Crisis Be Ready 2019 (Video) NIKOS HILADAKIS · 12 JUL. 2019 WARNING: The Coming Food Crisis Be Ready 2019 Overpopulation and Lack of Food Overpopulation is a somewhat relative concept. Of course it is associated with very large populations, but not always. Even a region with a large population does not necessarily have a problem of overpopulation, since it can support its inhabitants. On the other hand, if a place can not feed its inhabitants, there is a problem of overpopulation without necessarily having a huge number of people. So overpopulation has to do with the balance between a population and the availability of the goods necessary for their dignified living. The sudden population influx usually follows food shortages. The problem of hunger is of course related to food production, but not always. In fact, if there are now hungry areas in the world, this is partly due to the inequality that exists. Countries like the European have such a surplus of food to subsidize their farmers to bury them! At the same time elsewhere, they are hungry. The fact that they are hungry in some countries has to do even with the choices they made (or imposed on) their cultivations. Many have turned to non-eating crops such as coffee and cocoa. As long as these species sold there was no problem. But when global demand declined, they were left with tons of coffee and cocoa in their warehouses. And as they are not eaten, hungry hit the door. Some do not care about it. In neighboring Turkey, for example, they see the terrifying increase in the population as a force: We are many and that makes us strong, they say. This is true if one thinks of a nation with Stepa's logic, where as long as the earth has no end and limit, people do not. At the door of Europe, however, things are different. Many blame the religions for the excessive population growth of the Earth. Particularly certain doctrines of Christianity which, in fact, discourage birth control. The fact is that the same and even more conservative view is given by most - and more massive - religions of the East (eg, Hinduism). In the "Christian" countries, however, the birth rate is controlled. The problem lies with the East. Probably overpopulation is not a problem that religions create, though in Asia, they certainly reinforce it. Interestingly, the religions that prevail in areas where overpopulation has long been a problem, Eastern religions constitute or even impose vegetarianism. They are, of course, referring to metaphysical concerns about it. Whatever it is, it is a wise choice. Today we know that meat-based diet is an energy waste of natural resources. The only diet that can provide food for huge populations is vegetarian. Part of the problem is that there are no solutions that are not idealistic. They usually require a mood for co-operation, solidarity, ideals that are species in deficiency in human societies. There are also realistic solutions, but, realism is hard and its choice is easy only by those who are not directly affected. But there are also some "keys" that could lead to "magical" solutions. Continue here: https://terrapapers.com/yperlithysmos-ke-ellipsi-t... Decode the Agenda 2030 Agenda 2030 - The Protocols of the New Order of Things UN agenda 2030, is a plan for the worldwide enslavement of humanity under the boot of the Corporate Eminent. The 193 UN member states reached agreement on the new development agenda for the next 15 years. The agreement refers to the eradication of poverty and hunger, the safeguarding of gender equality, the improvement of survival standards and the urgent need to take measures to combat climate change. State representatives agreed late on Sunday evening 03/08/2015 setting 17 goals with 169 specific targets on poverty "in all aspects and everywhere" to ensure quality education and adequate energy and protection environment. The 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda will be voted by the UN shortly before the annual meeting of world leaders on Tuesday, September 3rd. Secretary General Ban Guy-Mun said the deal is "to secure peace and prosperity by focusing on cooperation with people and the environment" We translated and decoded 17 items on Agenda 2030. This document does not describe anything less than a global government buying every nation across the globe. The "goals" of this document are nothing more than code words for the company with the fascist tyrannical agenda that intends to imprison the civilized human beings of the cement cities, into a dilapidated cycle of poverty, poverty and starvation while enriching the world's most powerful global companies such as Monsanto and DuPont. All the articles we mention exist in terrapapers.com and are constantly on the go, looking for more complete information and not hiding behind your finger. It is absolutely clear the plans of the Herpetological Subordinates as well as what actions are needed on the part of man - no matter how he does - in order not to carry out these plans. Objective 1) The end of poverty in all its forms everywhere Translation: Put everyone in social welfare, food vouchers, housing subsidies and brochures that make them slaves obedient to the world government. Never allow people upward mobility to help themselves. Instead, it will be taught mass victimization and obedience to a government that provides a minimum monthly "allowance" for commodity money such as food and medicine. The tag will be called "eradication of poverty" and will ensure that human beings are fed as much as they can, crawl and work. At least two dozen microbiologists around the world have died violently in recent years. Surprisingly, some of them worked in the DNA sequence. The best known was Dr. David Kelly who died in July 2003. He was working for Mossad, Kelly orchestrated the apostasy of the Russian microbiologist Vladimir Pasechnik, who was working on a biological weapon capable of destroying one-third of the world's population . In October 2004, Dmtry Lvov, head of the Russian Institute of Virology, said that up to a billion people worldwide could die during the next pandemic. It seems that the human flock is going to be killed in a spectacular way. For whatever reason, dead microbiologists did not go along with the program. In essence, what the US is trying to achieve is to impose on the planet its own policies on the production, export and import of products that will have effect vis-à-vis the national laws of each country. Large multinationals will therefore be able to draw in the courts any other country on the planet in which they will operate, and which votes national laws contrary to their interests. Although this outlook is the most frightening of all, the benefits of the agreement do not stop there. Continue here: https://terrapapers.com/apododikopiisi-tis-atzenta... RECIPIENT GROUP OF CHILDREN www.nikosxeiladakis.gr http://nikosxeiladakis.gr/%cf%80%cf%81%ce%bf%ce%b5%ce%b9%ce%b4%ce%bf%cf%80%ce%bf%ce%b9%ce%b7%cf%83%ce%b7-%ce%b7-%ce%b5%cf%80%ce%b5%cf%81%cf%87%cf%8c%ce%bc%ce%b5%ce%bd%ce%b7-%ce%ba%cf%81%ce%af%cf%83%ce%b7-%cf%84%cf%81%ce%bf/
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  • 'Staggering' UN Warning That Climate Crisis Disasters Now Occur Weekly Provokes Calls for Action
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/07/07/staggering-un-warning-climate-crisis-disasters-now-occur-weekly-provokes-calls
    Jessica Corbett, staff writer

    A "staggering" new warning from a top United Nations official that climate crisis-related disasters are now occurring at the rate of one per week, with developing nations disproportionately at risk, provoked calls for immediate global action to combat the human-caused climate emergency.

    The warning came in an interview with The Guardian, which reported Sunday:

    Catastrophes such as cyclones Idai and Kenneth in Mozambique and the drought afflicting India make headlines around the world. But large numbers of "lower impact events" that are causing death, displacement, and suffering are occurring much faster than predicted, said Mami Mizutori, the U.N. secretary-general's special representative on disaster risk reduction. "This is not about the future, this is about today."

    This means that adapting to the climate crisis could no longer be seen as a long-term problem, but one that needed investment now, she said. "People need to talk more about adaptation and resilience."

    "We talk about a climate emergency and a climate crisis, but if we cannot confront this [issue of adapting to the effects] we will not survive," Mizutori added. "We need to look at the risks of not investing in resilience."

    The estimated annual cost of climate-related disasters is $520 billion, the newspaper noted, "while the additional cost of building infrastructure that is resistant to the effects of global heating is only about 3 percent, or $2.7 trillion in total over the next 20 years."

    "This is not a lot of money [in the context of infrastructure spending], but investors have not been doing enough," said Mizutori. "Resilience needs to become a commodity that people will pay for."

    Mizutori said that improving the systems that warn the public of severe weather and expanding awareness of which places and people are most vulnerable could help prevent lower impact disasters. She noted that while urgent work is needed to prepare the developing world, richer countries are also experiencing the consequences of global heating—including devastating wildfires and dangerous heatwaves.

    The adaption measures Mizutori called for include raising—and enforcing— infrastructure standards to make houses and businesses, roads and railways, and energy and water systems more capable of withstanding the impacts of the warming world, which scientists warn will increasing mean more frequent and intense extreme weather events. She also highlighted the potential of "nature-based solutions."

    Peter Strachan—a professor and expert on energy policy, environmental management, and energy transitions at the U.K.'s Robert Gordon University—called the report "staggering" and alerted several environmental and climate advocacy groups on Twitter.

    Sharing The Guardian's article on Twitter, the U.S.-based youth-led Sunrise Movement declared: "This is an emergency. We need political leadership that acts like it."

    "This is why it's so offensive to talk about climate impacting 'our children/grandchildren,'" tweeted War on Want executive director Asad Rehman, referencing a common talking point among U.S., European, and U.N. leaders. "Do people of global South facing disaster every week not deserve the right to life? The answer from rich countries and those who call for net zero by 2050 is a big No."
    'Staggering' UN Warning That Climate Crisis Disasters Now Occur Weekly Provokes Calls for Action https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/07/07/staggering-un-warning-climate-crisis-disasters-now-occur-weekly-provokes-calls Jessica Corbett, staff writer A "staggering" new warning from a top United Nations official that climate crisis-related disasters are now occurring at the rate of one per week, with developing nations disproportionately at risk, provoked calls for immediate global action to combat the human-caused climate emergency. The warning came in an interview with The Guardian, which reported Sunday: Catastrophes such as cyclones Idai and Kenneth in Mozambique and the drought afflicting India make headlines around the world. But large numbers of "lower impact events" that are causing death, displacement, and suffering are occurring much faster than predicted, said Mami Mizutori, the U.N. secretary-general's special representative on disaster risk reduction. "This is not about the future, this is about today." This means that adapting to the climate crisis could no longer be seen as a long-term problem, but one that needed investment now, she said. "People need to talk more about adaptation and resilience." "We talk about a climate emergency and a climate crisis, but if we cannot confront this [issue of adapting to the effects] we will not survive," Mizutori added. "We need to look at the risks of not investing in resilience." The estimated annual cost of climate-related disasters is $520 billion, the newspaper noted, "while the additional cost of building infrastructure that is resistant to the effects of global heating is only about 3 percent, or $2.7 trillion in total over the next 20 years." "This is not a lot of money [in the context of infrastructure spending], but investors have not been doing enough," said Mizutori. "Resilience needs to become a commodity that people will pay for." Mizutori said that improving the systems that warn the public of severe weather and expanding awareness of which places and people are most vulnerable could help prevent lower impact disasters. She noted that while urgent work is needed to prepare the developing world, richer countries are also experiencing the consequences of global heating—including devastating wildfires and dangerous heatwaves. The adaption measures Mizutori called for include raising—and enforcing— infrastructure standards to make houses and businesses, roads and railways, and energy and water systems more capable of withstanding the impacts of the warming world, which scientists warn will increasing mean more frequent and intense extreme weather events. She also highlighted the potential of "nature-based solutions." Peter Strachan—a professor and expert on energy policy, environmental management, and energy transitions at the U.K.'s Robert Gordon University—called the report "staggering" and alerted several environmental and climate advocacy groups on Twitter. Sharing The Guardian's article on Twitter, the U.S.-based youth-led Sunrise Movement declared: "This is an emergency. We need political leadership that acts like it." "This is why it's so offensive to talk about climate impacting 'our children/grandchildren,'" tweeted War on Want executive director Asad Rehman, referencing a common talking point among U.S., European, and U.N. leaders. "Do people of global South facing disaster every week not deserve the right to life? The answer from rich countries and those who call for net zero by 2050 is a big No."
    'Staggering' UN Warning That Climate Crisis Disasters Now Occur Weekly Provokes Calls for Action
    "This is an emergency. We need political leadership that acts like it."
    WWW.COMMONDREAMS.ORG
    1
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  • Demanding End to 'Rotten' Opposition to Medicare for All, Doctors and Nurses to March on American Medical Association's Annual Meeting
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/06/07/demanding-end-rotten-opposition-medicare-all-doctors-and-nurses-march-american
    Jake Johnson, staff writer

    Accusing the American Medical Association of putting "profits ahead of patient care" by joining the corporate fight against Medicare for All, a coalition of physicians, nurses, and allies plans to march on the organization's annual meeting on Saturday to demand an end to its longstanding opposition to single-payer.

    The AMA is America's largest association of physicians, one of the largest lobbying organizations in the U.S., and a founding member of the Partnership for America's Health Care Future, a coalition formed by insurance and pharmaceutical interests to combat Medicare for All.

    On Saturday, medical professionals dressed in their scrubs and white coats intend to rally at the AMA's gathering at the Hyatt Regency in Chicago to make clear that the organization's anti-Medicare for All stance does not represent the view of all—or even most—physicians and nurses.

    "America's doctors see the harm that our profit-oriented, fragmented healthcare system imposes on patients—and how it impedes our work as physicians," tweeted Adam Gaffney, president of Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), which helped organize Saturday's march alongside National Nurses United (NNU), Students for a National Health Program, and other groups.

    "So tomorrow," Gaffney said, "we're calling on the AMA to join us in the fight for a better, more just healthcare system for everyone."

    In an op-ed for The Guardian on Thursday, a group of medical students and organizers planning to take part in Saturday's march wrote that while the "AMA claims to represent the interests and values of our nation's doctors... it has long been the public relations face of America's private health insurance system, which treats healthcare as a commodity."

    "Medical students and professionals have had enough," the group added. "This Saturday's protest is only one example."

    In a 2017 survey, physician recruitment firm Merritt Hawkins found that 56 percent of doctors either strongly or somewhat support a single-payer system.

    Alluding to that data, Gaffney tweeted that the "AMA is not speaking for the American medical profession when it comes to healthcare reform."

    "It's time for the AMA to leave the Partnership for America's Health Care Future," Gaffney said in a statement, "and join the majority of physicians who support improved Medicare for All."

    Bill Bianchi, a member of progressive organization People's Action who plans to take part in Saturday's protest, wrote Friday that the AMA's opposition to Medicare for All "is rotten to the core."

    "You'd think the nation's largest association of doctors—whose stated goal is 'the betterment of public health'—would want patients to get care. But the AMA has opposed every major effort to expand health access since 1917," Bianchi wrote.

    "We demand that you and the other members of the Partnership for America's Health Care Future step out of the way of Medicare for All. We are going to win care for every American, with or without you."

    The march on the AMA's gathering will come as Rep. Pramila Jayapal's (D-Wash.) Medicare for All Act of 2019 gains momentum in the House.

    On Tuesday, Assistant House Speaker Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.) became the highest-ranking House Democrat yet to sign on to Jayapal's bill, bringing the total number of co-sponsors to 112.

    Medicare for All is also set to get a historic moment in the spotlight next week, with the House Ways and Means Committee scheduled to hold its first-ever single-payer hearing on Wednesday.

    As The Hill reported, the "June 12 hearing will mark the first time the proposal is considered by a committee that has jurisdiction over healthcare issues."

    "It's the biggest congressional hearing to date," NNU wrote in an email to supporters on Thursday. "All of the funding and policies for Medicare for All will ultimately be decided by this committee."

    Noting that 13 of the Democrats on the powerful committee have not signed on to the Medicare for All Act, NNU urged the public to dial up pressure on committee members ahead of next week's hearing.

    "This is no time for half-measures or watered-down proposals," NNU said. "More than 70 million Americans are uninsured or underinsured, and we can't let Congress maintain a status quo when so many lives are on the line."
    Demanding End to 'Rotten' Opposition to Medicare for All, Doctors and Nurses to March on American Medical Association's Annual Meeting https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/06/07/demanding-end-rotten-opposition-medicare-all-doctors-and-nurses-march-american Jake Johnson, staff writer Accusing the American Medical Association of putting "profits ahead of patient care" by joining the corporate fight against Medicare for All, a coalition of physicians, nurses, and allies plans to march on the organization's annual meeting on Saturday to demand an end to its longstanding opposition to single-payer. The AMA is America's largest association of physicians, one of the largest lobbying organizations in the U.S., and a founding member of the Partnership for America's Health Care Future, a coalition formed by insurance and pharmaceutical interests to combat Medicare for All. On Saturday, medical professionals dressed in their scrubs and white coats intend to rally at the AMA's gathering at the Hyatt Regency in Chicago to make clear that the organization's anti-Medicare for All stance does not represent the view of all—or even most—physicians and nurses. "America's doctors see the harm that our profit-oriented, fragmented healthcare system imposes on patients—and how it impedes our work as physicians," tweeted Adam Gaffney, president of Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), which helped organize Saturday's march alongside National Nurses United (NNU), Students for a National Health Program, and other groups. "So tomorrow," Gaffney said, "we're calling on the AMA to join us in the fight for a better, more just healthcare system for everyone." In an op-ed for The Guardian on Thursday, a group of medical students and organizers planning to take part in Saturday's march wrote that while the "AMA claims to represent the interests and values of our nation's doctors... it has long been the public relations face of America's private health insurance system, which treats healthcare as a commodity." "Medical students and professionals have had enough," the group added. "This Saturday's protest is only one example." In a 2017 survey, physician recruitment firm Merritt Hawkins found that 56 percent of doctors either strongly or somewhat support a single-payer system. Alluding to that data, Gaffney tweeted that the "AMA is not speaking for the American medical profession when it comes to healthcare reform." "It's time for the AMA to leave the Partnership for America's Health Care Future," Gaffney said in a statement, "and join the majority of physicians who support improved Medicare for All." Bill Bianchi, a member of progressive organization People's Action who plans to take part in Saturday's protest, wrote Friday that the AMA's opposition to Medicare for All "is rotten to the core." "You'd think the nation's largest association of doctors—whose stated goal is 'the betterment of public health'—would want patients to get care. But the AMA has opposed every major effort to expand health access since 1917," Bianchi wrote. "We demand that you and the other members of the Partnership for America's Health Care Future step out of the way of Medicare for All. We are going to win care for every American, with or without you." The march on the AMA's gathering will come as Rep. Pramila Jayapal's (D-Wash.) Medicare for All Act of 2019 gains momentum in the House. On Tuesday, Assistant House Speaker Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.) became the highest-ranking House Democrat yet to sign on to Jayapal's bill, bringing the total number of co-sponsors to 112. Medicare for All is also set to get a historic moment in the spotlight next week, with the House Ways and Means Committee scheduled to hold its first-ever single-payer hearing on Wednesday. As The Hill reported, the "June 12 hearing will mark the first time the proposal is considered by a committee that has jurisdiction over healthcare issues." "It's the biggest congressional hearing to date," NNU wrote in an email to supporters on Thursday. "All of the funding and policies for Medicare for All will ultimately be decided by this committee." Noting that 13 of the Democrats on the powerful committee have not signed on to the Medicare for All Act, NNU urged the public to dial up pressure on committee members ahead of next week's hearing. "This is no time for half-measures or watered-down proposals," NNU said. "More than 70 million Americans are uninsured or underinsured, and we can't let Congress maintain a status quo when so many lives are on the line."
    Demanding End to 'Rotten' Opposition to Medicare for All, Doctors and Nurses to March on American Medical Association's Annual Meeting
    "It's time for the AMA to join the majority of physicians who support improved Medicare for All."
    WWW.COMMONDREAMS.ORG
    1
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  • REQUEST for a full corporate offer for COAL NAR 3800
    I, hereby with full corporate
    responsibility we are ready, willing, and able to purchase, following good, subject to the terms and conditions as below:

     Commodity : Steam Coal in bulk

     Specification : Standard specification of Mining company.

     Net Calorific Value (As Received Basis) : 3800 KCAL / KG

     Total Moisture (As Received Basis) : 30.23 PCT

     Inherent Moisture (Air Dried Basis) : 17.26 PCT

     Volatile Matters (Air Dried Basis) : 38.16 PCT

     Ash (Air Dried Basis) : 6.45 PCT

     Total Sulphur (Air Dried Basis) : 0.17 PCT

     Hardgrove Index : 46

     Sizing 0-50 MM : 92.25 PCT

     Quantity : 140,000 MT+/-10% per Month for 12 Months
    (Two shipments each 70,000 MT)

     Shipment Terms : CIF DANDONG PORT CHINA

     Inspection : SGS or similar institution

     Payment Terms : Letter of Credit(L/C)

    Kindly provide us with FCO along with actual Specification.

    NB: Quotation should come from miner from AFRICA only who can supply this
    REQUEST for a full corporate offer for COAL NAR 3800 I, hereby with full corporate responsibility we are ready, willing, and able to purchase, following good, subject to the terms and conditions as below:  Commodity : Steam Coal in bulk  Specification : Standard specification of Mining company.  Net Calorific Value (As Received Basis) : 3800 KCAL / KG  Total Moisture (As Received Basis) : 30.23 PCT  Inherent Moisture (Air Dried Basis) : 17.26 PCT  Volatile Matters (Air Dried Basis) : 38.16 PCT  Ash (Air Dried Basis) : 6.45 PCT  Total Sulphur (Air Dried Basis) : 0.17 PCT  Hardgrove Index : 46  Sizing 0-50 MM : 92.25 PCT  Quantity : 140,000 MT+/-10% per Month for 12 Months (Two shipments each 70,000 MT)  Shipment Terms : CIF DANDONG PORT CHINA  Inspection : SGS or similar institution  Payment Terms : Letter of Credit(L/C) Kindly provide us with FCO along with actual Specification. NB: Quotation should come from miner from AFRICA only who can supply this
    1
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  • Decriminalizing the Drug War? Calculating the Damage from a Century of Drug Prohibition
    https://desultoryheroics.com/2019/05/06/decriminalizing-the-drug-war/
    Posted By Luther Blissett
    By Alfred W. McCoy: TomDispatch 5/6/19

    We live in a time of change, when people are questioning old assumptions and seeking new directions. In the ongoing debate over health care, social justice, and border security, there is, however, one overlooked issue that should be at the top of everyone’s agenda, from Democratic Socialists to libertarian Republicans: America’s longest war.

    No, not the one in Afghanistan. I mean the drug war.

    For more than a century, the U.S. has worked through the U.N. (and its predecessor, the League of Nations) to build a harsh global drug prohibition regime — grounded in draconian laws, enforced by pervasive policing, and punished with mass incarceration.

    For the past half-century, the U.S. has also waged its own “war on drugs” that has complicated its foreign policy, compromised its electoral democracy, and contributed to social inequality. Perhaps the time has finally come to assess the damage that drug war has caused and consider alternatives.

    Even though I first made my mark with a 1972 book that the CIA tried to suppress on the heroin trade in Southeast Asia, it’s taken me most of my life to grasp all the complex ways this country’s drug war, from Afghanistan to Colombia, the Mexican border to inner-city Chicago, has shaped American society.

    Last summer, a French director doing a documentary interviewed me for seven hours about the history of illicit narcotics. As we moved from the seventeenth century to the present and from Asia to America, I found myself trying to answer the same relentless question: What had 50 years of observation actually drilled into me, beyond some random facts, about the character of the illicit traffic in drugs?

    At the broadest level, the past half-century turns out to have taught me that drugs aren’t just drugs, drug dealers aren’t just “pushers,” and drug users aren’t just “junkies” (that is, outcasts of no consequence). Illicit drugs are major global commodities that continue to influence U.S. politics, both national and international.

    And our drug wars create profitable covert netherworlds in which those very drugs flourish and become even more profitable.

    Indeed, the U.N. once estimated that the transnational traffic, which supplied drugs to 4.2% of the world’s adult population, was a $400 billion industry, the equivalent of 8% of global trade.

    In ways that few seem to understand, illicit drugs have had a profound influence on modern America, shaping our international politics, national elections, and domestic social relations.

    Yet a feeling that illicit drugs belong to a marginalized demimonde has made U.S. drug policy the sole property of law enforcement and not health care, education, or urban development.

    During this process of reflection, I’ve returned to three conversations I had back in 1971 when I was a 26-year-old graduate student researching that first book of mine, The Politics of Heroin: CIA Complicity in the Global Drug Trade. In the course of an 18-month odyssey around the globe, I met three men, deeply involved in the drug wars, whose words I was then too young to fully absorb.

    The first was Lucien Conein, a “legendary” CIA operative whose covert career ranged from parachuting into North Vietnam in 1945 to train communist guerrillas with Ho Chi Minh to organizing the CIA coup that killed South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem in 1963.

    In the course of our interview at his modest home near CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, he laid out just how the Agency’s operatives, like so many Corsican gangsters, practiced the “clandestine arts” of conducting complex operations beyond the bounds of civil society and how such “arts” were, in fact, the heart and soul of both covert operations and the drug trade.

    Second came Colonel Roger Trinquier, whose life in a French drug netherworld extended from commanding paratroopers in the opium-growing highlands of Vietnam during the First Indochina War of the early 1950s to serving as deputy to General Jacques Massu in his campaign of murder and torture in the Battle of Algiers in 1957.

    During an interview in his elegant Paris apartment, Trinquier explained how he helped fund his own paratroop operations through Indochina’s illicit opium traffic. Emerging from that interview, I felt almost overwhelmed by the aura of Nietzschean omnipotence that Trinquier had clearly gained from his many years in this shadowy realm of drugs and death.

    My last mentor on the subject of drugs was Tom Tripodi, a covert operative who had trained Cuban exiles in Florida for the CIA’s 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion and then, in the late 1970s, penetrated mafia networks in Sicily for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

    In 1971, he appeared at my front door in New Haven, Connecticut, identified himself as a senior agent for the Treasury Department’s Bureau of Narcotics, and insisted that the Bureau was worried about my future book.

    Rather tentatively, I showed him just a few draft pages of my manuscript for The Politics of Heroin and he promptly offered to help me make it as accurate as possible.

    During later visits, I would hand him chapters and he would sit in a rocking chair, shirt sleeves rolled up, revolver in his shoulder holster, scribbling corrections and telling remarkable stories about the drug trade — like the time his Bureau found that French intelligence was protecting the Corsican syndicates smuggling heroin into New York City.

    Far more important, though, through him I grasped how ad hoc alliances between criminal traffickers and the CIA regularly helped both the Agency and the drug trade prosper.

    Looking back, I can now see how those veteran operatives were each describing to me a clandestine political domain, a covert netherworld in which government agents, military men, and drug traders were freed from the shackles of civil society and empowered to form secret armies, overthrow governments, and even, perhaps, kill a foreign president.

    At its core, this netherworld was then and remains today an invisible political realm inhabited by criminal actors and practitioners of Conein’s “clandestine arts.”

    Offering some sense of the scale of this social milieu, in 1997 the United Nations reported that transnational crime syndicates had 3.3 million members worldwide who trafficked in drugs, arms, humans, and endangered species. Meanwhile, during the Cold War, all the major powers — Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States — deployed expanded clandestine services worldwide, making covert operations a central facet of geopolitical power. The end of the Cold War has in no way changed this reality.

    For over a century now, states and empires have used their expanding powers for moral prohibition campaigns that have periodically transformed alcohol, gambling, tobacco, and, above all, drugs into an illicit commerce that generates sufficient cash to sustain covert netherworlds.

    Drugs and U.S. Foreign Policy

    The influence of illicit drugs on U.S. foreign policy was evident between 1979 and 2019 in the abysmal failure of its never-ending wars in Afghanistan. Over a period of 40 years, two U.S. interventions there fostered all the conditions for just such a covert netherworld.

    While mobilizing Islamic fundamentalists to fight the Soviet occupation of that country in the 1980s, the CIA tolerated opium trafficking by its Afghan mujahedeen allies, while arming them for a guerrilla war that would ravage the countryside, destroying conventional agriculture and herding.

    In the decade after superpower intervention ended in 1989, a devastating civil war and then Taliban rule only increased the country’s dependence upon drugs, raising opium production from 250 tons in 1979 to 4,600 tons by 1999.

    This 20-fold increase transformed Afghanistan from a diverse agricultural economy into a country with the world’s first opium monocrop — that is, a land thoroughly dependent on illicit drugs for exports, employment, and taxes. Demonstrating that dependence, in 2000 when the Taliban banned opium in a bid for diplomatic recognition and cut production to just 185 tons, the rural economy imploded and their regime collapsed as the first U.S. bombs fell in October 2001.

    To say the least, the U.S. invasion and occupation of 2001-2002 failed to effectively deal with the drug situation in the country.

    As a start, to capture the Taliban-controlled capital, Kabul, the CIA had mobilized Northern Alliance leaders who had long dominated the drug trade in northeast Afghanistan, as well as Pashtun warlords active as drug smugglers in the southeastern part of the country. In the process, they created a post-war politics ideal for the expansion of opium cultivation.

    Even though output surged in the first three years of the U.S. occupation, Washington remained uninterested, resisting anything that might weaken military operations against the Taliban guerrillas.

    Testifying to this policy’s failure, the U.N.’s Afghanistan Opium Survey 2007 reported that the harvest that year reached a record 8,200 tons, generating 53% of the country’s gross domestic product, while accounting for 93% of the world’s illicit narcotics supply.

    When a single commodity represents over half of a nation’s economy, everyone — officials, rebels, merchants, and traffickers — is directly or indirectly implicated. In 2016, the New York Times reported that both Taliban rebels and provincial officials opposing them were locked in a struggle for control of the lucrative drug traffic in Helmand Province, the source of nearly half the country’s opium.

    A year later, the harvest reached a record 9,000 tons, which, according to the U.S. command, provided 60% of the Taliban’s funding. Desperate to cut that funding, American commanders dispatched F-22 fighters and B-52 bombers to destroy the insurgency’s heroin laboratories in Helmand — doing inconsequential damage to a handful of crude labs and revealing the impotence of even the most powerful weaponry against the social power of the covert drug netherworld.

    With unchecked opium production sustaining Taliban resistance for the past 17 years and capable of doing so for another 17, the only U.S. exit strategy now seems to be restoring those rebels to power in a coalition government — a policy tantamount to conceding defeat in its longest military intervention and least successful drug war.

    High Priests of Prohibition

    For the past half-century, the ever-failing U.S. drug war has found a compliant handmaiden at the U.N., whose dubious role when it comes to drug policy stands in stark contrast to its positive work on issues like climate change and peace-keeping.

    In 1997, the director of U.N. drug control, Dr. Pino Arlacchi, proclaimed a 10-year program to eradicate all illicit opium and coca cultivation from the face of the planet, starting in Afghanistan.

    A decade later, his successor, Antonio Maria Costa, glossing over that failure, announced in the U.N.’s World Drug Report 2007 that “drug control is working and the world drug problem is being contained.”

    While U.N. leaders were making such grandiloquent promises about drug prohibition, the world’s illicit opium production was, in fact, rising 10-fold from just 1,200 tons in 1971, the year the U.S. drug war officially started, to a record 10,500 tons by 2017.

    This gap between triumphal rhetoric and dismal reality cries out for an explanation.

    That 10-fold increase in illicit opium supply is the result of a market dynamic I’ve termed “the stimulus of prohibition.”

    At the most basic level, prohibition is the necessary precondition for the global narcotics trade, creating both local drug lords and transnational syndicates that control this vast commerce.

    Prohibition, of course, guarantees the existence and well-being of such criminal syndicates which, to evade interdiction, constantly shift and build up their smuggling routes, hierarchies, and mechanisms, encouraging a worldwide proliferation of trafficking and consumption, while ensuring that the drug netherworld will only grow.

    In seeking to prohibit addictive drugs, U.S. and U.N. drug warriors act as if mobilizing for forceful repression could actually reduce drug trafficking, thanks to the imagined inelasticity of, or limits on, the global narcotics supply.

    In practice, however, when suppression reduces the opium supply from one area (Burma or Thailand), the global price just rises, spurring traders and growers to sell off stocks, old growers to plant more, and new areas (Colombia) to enter production. In addition, such repression usually only increases consumption.

    If drug seizures, for instance, raise the street price, then addicted consumers will maintain their habit by cutting other expenses (food, rent) or raising their income by dealing drugs to new users and so expanding the trade.

    Instead of reducing the traffic, the drug war has actually helped stimulate that 10-fold increase in global opium production and a parallel surge in U.S. heroin users from just 68,000 in 1970 to 886,000 in 2017.

    By attacking supply and failing to treat demand, the U.N.-U.S. drug war has been pursuing a “solution” to drugs that defies the immutable law of supply and demand.

    As a result, Washington’s drug war has, in the past 50 years, gone from defeat to debacle.

    The Domestic Influence of Illicit Drugs

    That drug war has, however, incredible staying power. It has persisted despite decades of failure because of an underlying partisan logic.

    In 1973, while President Richard Nixon was still fighting his drug war in Turkey and Thailand, New York’s Republican governor, Nelson Rockefeller, enacted the notorious “Rockefeller Drug Laws.” Those included mandatory penalties of 15 years to life for the possession of just four ounces of narcotics.

    As the police swept inner-city streets for low-level offenders, annual prison sentences in New York State for drug crimes surged from only 470 in 1970 to a peak of 8,500 in 1999, with African-Americans representing 90% of those incarcerated.

    By then, New York’s state prisons held a previously unimaginable 73,000 people. During the 1980s, President Ronald Reagan, a conservative Republican, dusted off Rockefeller’s anti-drug campaign for intensified domestic enforcement, calling for a “national crusade” against drugs and winning draconian federal penalties for personal drug use and small-scale dealing.

    For the previous 50 years, the U.S. prison population had remained remarkably stable at just 110 prisoners per 100,000 people.

    The new drug war, however, doubled those prisoners from 370,000 in 1981 to 713,000 in 1989.

    Driven by Reagan-era drug laws and parallel state legislation, prison inmates soared to 2.3 million by 2008, raising the country’s incarceration rate to an extraordinary 751 prisoners per 100,000 population.

    And 51% of those in federal penitentiaries were there for drug offenses.

    Such mass incarceration has led as well to significant disenfranchisement, starting a trend that would, by 2012, deny the vote to nearly six million people, including 8% of all African-American voting-age adults, a liberal constituency that had gone overwhelmingly Democratic for more than half a century.

    In addition, this carceral regime concentrated its prison populations, including guards and other prison workers, in conservative rural districts of the country, creating something akin to latter-day “rotten boroughs” for the Republican Party.

    Take, for example, New York’s 21st Congressional District, which covers the Adirondacks and the state’s heavily forested northern panhandle.

    It’s home to 14 state prisons, including some 16,000 inmates, 5,000 employees, and their 8,000 family members — making them collectively the district’s largest employer and a defining political presence.

    Add in the 13,000 or so troops in nearby Fort Drum and you have a reliably conservative bloc of 26,000 voters (and 16,000 non-voters), or the largest political force in a district where only 240,000 residents actually vote.

    Not surprisingly, the incumbent Republican congresswoman survived the 2018 blue wave to win handily with 56% of the vote. (So never say that the drug war had no effect.)

    So successful were Reagan Republicans in framing this partisan drug policy as a moral imperative that two of his liberal Democratic successors, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, avoided any serious reform of it. Instead of systemic change, Obama offered clemency to about 1,700 convicts, an insignificant handful among the hundreds of thousands still locked up for non-violent drug offenses.

    While partisan paralysis at the federal level has blocked change, the separate states, forced to bear the rising costs of incarceration, have slowly begun reducing prison populations.

    In a November 2018 ballot measure, for instance, Florida — where the 2000 presidential election was decided by just 537 ballots — voted to restore electoral rights to the state’s 1.4 million felons, including 400,000 African-Americans.

    No sooner did that plebiscite pass, however, than Florida’s Republican legislators desperately tried to claw back that defeat by requiring that the same felons pay fines and court costs before returning to the electoral rolls.

    Not only does the drug war influence U.S. politics in all sorts of negative ways but it has reshaped American society — and not for the better, either.

    The surprising role of illicit drug distribution in ordering life inside some of the country’s major cities has been illuminated in a careful study by a University of Chicago researcher who gained access to the financial records of a drug gang inside Chicago’s impoverished Southside housing projects.

    He found that, in 2005, the Black Gangster Disciple Nation, known as GD, had about 120 bosses who employed 5,300 young men, largely as street dealers, and had another 20,000 members aspiring to those very jobs.

    While the boss of each of the gang’s hundred crews earned about $100,000 annually, his three officers made just $7.00 an hour, his 50 street dealers only $3.30 an hour, and their hundreds of other members served as unpaid apprentices, vying for entry-level slots when street dealers were killed, a fate which one in four regularly suffered.

    So what does all this mean? In an impoverished inner city with very limited job opportunities, this drug gang provided high-mortality employment on a par with the minimum wage (then $5.15 a hour) that their peers in more affluent neighborhoods earned from much safer work at McDonald’s.

    Moreover, with some 25,000 members in Southside Chicago, GD was providing social order for young men in the volatile 16-to-30 age cohort — minimizing random violence, reducing petty crime, and helping Chicago maintain its gloss as a world-class business center.

    Until there is sufficient education and employment in the nation’s cities, the illicit drug market will continue to fill the void with work that carries a high cost in violence, addiction, imprisonment, and more generally blighted lives.

    The End of Drug Prohibition

    As the global prohibition effort enters its second century, we are witnessing two countervailing trends.

    The very idea of a prohibition regime has reached a crescendo of dead-end violence not just in Afghanistan but recently in Southeast Asia, demonstrating the failure of the drug war’s repression strategy.

    In 2003, Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra launched a campaign against methamphetamine abuse that prompted his police to carry out 2,275 extrajudicial killings in just three months.

    Carrying that coercive logic to its ultimate conclusion, on his first day as Philippine president in 2016, Rodrigo Duterte ordered an attack on drug trafficking that has since yielded 1.3 million surrenders by dealers and users, 86,000 arrests, and some 20,000 bodies dumped on city streets across the country. Yet drug use remains deeply rooted in the slums of both Bangkok and Manila.

    On the other side of history’s ledger, the harm-reduction movement led by medical practitioners and community activists worldwide is slowly working to unravel the global prohibition regime.

    With a 1996 ballot measure, California voters, for instance, started a trend by legalizing medical marijuana sales.

    By 2018, Oklahoma had become the 30th state to legalize medical cannabis. Following initiatives by Colorado and Washington in 2012, eight more states to date have decriminalized the recreational use of cannabis, long the most widespread of all illicit drugs.

    Hit by a surge of heroin abuse during the 1980s, Portugal’s government first reacted with repression that, as everywhere else on the planet, did little to stanch rising drug abuse, crime, and infection.

    Gradually, a network of medical professionals across the country adopted harm-reduction measures that would provide a striking record of proven success.

    After two decades of this ad hoc trial, in 2001 Portugal decriminalized the possession of all illegal drugs, replacing incarceration with counseling and producing a sustained drop in HIV and hepatitis infections.

    Projecting this experience into the future, it seems likely that harm-reduction measures will be adopted progressively at local and national levels around the globe, while various endless and unsuccessful wars on drugs are curtailed or abandoned.

    Perhaps someday a caucus of Republican legislators in some oak-paneled Washington conference room and a choir of U.N. bureaucrats in their glass-towered Vienna headquarters will remain the only apostles preaching the discredited gospel of drug prohibition.
    Decriminalizing the Drug War? Calculating the Damage from a Century of Drug Prohibition https://desultoryheroics.com/2019/05/06/decriminalizing-the-drug-war/ Posted By Luther Blissett By Alfred W. McCoy: TomDispatch 5/6/19 We live in a time of change, when people are questioning old assumptions and seeking new directions. In the ongoing debate over health care, social justice, and border security, there is, however, one overlooked issue that should be at the top of everyone’s agenda, from Democratic Socialists to libertarian Republicans: America’s longest war. No, not the one in Afghanistan. I mean the drug war. For more than a century, the U.S. has worked through the U.N. (and its predecessor, the League of Nations) to build a harsh global drug prohibition regime — grounded in draconian laws, enforced by pervasive policing, and punished with mass incarceration. For the past half-century, the U.S. has also waged its own “war on drugs” that has complicated its foreign policy, compromised its electoral democracy, and contributed to social inequality. Perhaps the time has finally come to assess the damage that drug war has caused and consider alternatives. Even though I first made my mark with a 1972 book that the CIA tried to suppress on the heroin trade in Southeast Asia, it’s taken me most of my life to grasp all the complex ways this country’s drug war, from Afghanistan to Colombia, the Mexican border to inner-city Chicago, has shaped American society. Last summer, a French director doing a documentary interviewed me for seven hours about the history of illicit narcotics. As we moved from the seventeenth century to the present and from Asia to America, I found myself trying to answer the same relentless question: What had 50 years of observation actually drilled into me, beyond some random facts, about the character of the illicit traffic in drugs? At the broadest level, the past half-century turns out to have taught me that drugs aren’t just drugs, drug dealers aren’t just “pushers,” and drug users aren’t just “junkies” (that is, outcasts of no consequence). Illicit drugs are major global commodities that continue to influence U.S. politics, both national and international. And our drug wars create profitable covert netherworlds in which those very drugs flourish and become even more profitable. Indeed, the U.N. once estimated that the transnational traffic, which supplied drugs to 4.2% of the world’s adult population, was a $400 billion industry, the equivalent of 8% of global trade. In ways that few seem to understand, illicit drugs have had a profound influence on modern America, shaping our international politics, national elections, and domestic social relations. Yet a feeling that illicit drugs belong to a marginalized demimonde has made U.S. drug policy the sole property of law enforcement and not health care, education, or urban development. During this process of reflection, I’ve returned to three conversations I had back in 1971 when I was a 26-year-old graduate student researching that first book of mine, The Politics of Heroin: CIA Complicity in the Global Drug Trade. In the course of an 18-month odyssey around the globe, I met three men, deeply involved in the drug wars, whose words I was then too young to fully absorb. The first was Lucien Conein, a “legendary” CIA operative whose covert career ranged from parachuting into North Vietnam in 1945 to train communist guerrillas with Ho Chi Minh to organizing the CIA coup that killed South Vietnamese President Ngo Dinh Diem in 1963. In the course of our interview at his modest home near CIA headquarters in Langley, Virginia, he laid out just how the Agency’s operatives, like so many Corsican gangsters, practiced the “clandestine arts” of conducting complex operations beyond the bounds of civil society and how such “arts” were, in fact, the heart and soul of both covert operations and the drug trade. Second came Colonel Roger Trinquier, whose life in a French drug netherworld extended from commanding paratroopers in the opium-growing highlands of Vietnam during the First Indochina War of the early 1950s to serving as deputy to General Jacques Massu in his campaign of murder and torture in the Battle of Algiers in 1957. During an interview in his elegant Paris apartment, Trinquier explained how he helped fund his own paratroop operations through Indochina’s illicit opium traffic. Emerging from that interview, I felt almost overwhelmed by the aura of Nietzschean omnipotence that Trinquier had clearly gained from his many years in this shadowy realm of drugs and death. My last mentor on the subject of drugs was Tom Tripodi, a covert operative who had trained Cuban exiles in Florida for the CIA’s 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion and then, in the late 1970s, penetrated mafia networks in Sicily for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. In 1971, he appeared at my front door in New Haven, Connecticut, identified himself as a senior agent for the Treasury Department’s Bureau of Narcotics, and insisted that the Bureau was worried about my future book. Rather tentatively, I showed him just a few draft pages of my manuscript for The Politics of Heroin and he promptly offered to help me make it as accurate as possible. During later visits, I would hand him chapters and he would sit in a rocking chair, shirt sleeves rolled up, revolver in his shoulder holster, scribbling corrections and telling remarkable stories about the drug trade — like the time his Bureau found that French intelligence was protecting the Corsican syndicates smuggling heroin into New York City. Far more important, though, through him I grasped how ad hoc alliances between criminal traffickers and the CIA regularly helped both the Agency and the drug trade prosper. Looking back, I can now see how those veteran operatives were each describing to me a clandestine political domain, a covert netherworld in which government agents, military men, and drug traders were freed from the shackles of civil society and empowered to form secret armies, overthrow governments, and even, perhaps, kill a foreign president. At its core, this netherworld was then and remains today an invisible political realm inhabited by criminal actors and practitioners of Conein’s “clandestine arts.” Offering some sense of the scale of this social milieu, in 1997 the United Nations reported that transnational crime syndicates had 3.3 million members worldwide who trafficked in drugs, arms, humans, and endangered species. Meanwhile, during the Cold War, all the major powers — Britain, France, the Soviet Union, and the United States — deployed expanded clandestine services worldwide, making covert operations a central facet of geopolitical power. The end of the Cold War has in no way changed this reality. For over a century now, states and empires have used their expanding powers for moral prohibition campaigns that have periodically transformed alcohol, gambling, tobacco, and, above all, drugs into an illicit commerce that generates sufficient cash to sustain covert netherworlds. Drugs and U.S. Foreign Policy The influence of illicit drugs on U.S. foreign policy was evident between 1979 and 2019 in the abysmal failure of its never-ending wars in Afghanistan. Over a period of 40 years, two U.S. interventions there fostered all the conditions for just such a covert netherworld. While mobilizing Islamic fundamentalists to fight the Soviet occupation of that country in the 1980s, the CIA tolerated opium trafficking by its Afghan mujahedeen allies, while arming them for a guerrilla war that would ravage the countryside, destroying conventional agriculture and herding. In the decade after superpower intervention ended in 1989, a devastating civil war and then Taliban rule only increased the country’s dependence upon drugs, raising opium production from 250 tons in 1979 to 4,600 tons by 1999. This 20-fold increase transformed Afghanistan from a diverse agricultural economy into a country with the world’s first opium monocrop — that is, a land thoroughly dependent on illicit drugs for exports, employment, and taxes. Demonstrating that dependence, in 2000 when the Taliban banned opium in a bid for diplomatic recognition and cut production to just 185 tons, the rural economy imploded and their regime collapsed as the first U.S. bombs fell in October 2001. To say the least, the U.S. invasion and occupation of 2001-2002 failed to effectively deal with the drug situation in the country. As a start, to capture the Taliban-controlled capital, Kabul, the CIA had mobilized Northern Alliance leaders who had long dominated the drug trade in northeast Afghanistan, as well as Pashtun warlords active as drug smugglers in the southeastern part of the country. In the process, they created a post-war politics ideal for the expansion of opium cultivation. Even though output surged in the first three years of the U.S. occupation, Washington remained uninterested, resisting anything that might weaken military operations against the Taliban guerrillas. Testifying to this policy’s failure, the U.N.’s Afghanistan Opium Survey 2007 reported that the harvest that year reached a record 8,200 tons, generating 53% of the country’s gross domestic product, while accounting for 93% of the world’s illicit narcotics supply. When a single commodity represents over half of a nation’s economy, everyone — officials, rebels, merchants, and traffickers — is directly or indirectly implicated. In 2016, the New York Times reported that both Taliban rebels and provincial officials opposing them were locked in a struggle for control of the lucrative drug traffic in Helmand Province, the source of nearly half the country’s opium. A year later, the harvest reached a record 9,000 tons, which, according to the U.S. command, provided 60% of the Taliban’s funding. Desperate to cut that funding, American commanders dispatched F-22 fighters and B-52 bombers to destroy the insurgency’s heroin laboratories in Helmand — doing inconsequential damage to a handful of crude labs and revealing the impotence of even the most powerful weaponry against the social power of the covert drug netherworld. With unchecked opium production sustaining Taliban resistance for the past 17 years and capable of doing so for another 17, the only U.S. exit strategy now seems to be restoring those rebels to power in a coalition government — a policy tantamount to conceding defeat in its longest military intervention and least successful drug war. High Priests of Prohibition For the past half-century, the ever-failing U.S. drug war has found a compliant handmaiden at the U.N., whose dubious role when it comes to drug policy stands in stark contrast to its positive work on issues like climate change and peace-keeping. In 1997, the director of U.N. drug control, Dr. Pino Arlacchi, proclaimed a 10-year program to eradicate all illicit opium and coca cultivation from the face of the planet, starting in Afghanistan. A decade later, his successor, Antonio Maria Costa, glossing over that failure, announced in the U.N.’s World Drug Report 2007 that “drug control is working and the world drug problem is being contained.” While U.N. leaders were making such grandiloquent promises about drug prohibition, the world’s illicit opium production was, in fact, rising 10-fold from just 1,200 tons in 1971, the year the U.S. drug war officially started, to a record 10,500 tons by 2017. This gap between triumphal rhetoric and dismal reality cries out for an explanation. That 10-fold increase in illicit opium supply is the result of a market dynamic I’ve termed “the stimulus of prohibition.” At the most basic level, prohibition is the necessary precondition for the global narcotics trade, creating both local drug lords and transnational syndicates that control this vast commerce. Prohibition, of course, guarantees the existence and well-being of such criminal syndicates which, to evade interdiction, constantly shift and build up their smuggling routes, hierarchies, and mechanisms, encouraging a worldwide proliferation of trafficking and consumption, while ensuring that the drug netherworld will only grow. In seeking to prohibit addictive drugs, U.S. and U.N. drug warriors act as if mobilizing for forceful repression could actually reduce drug trafficking, thanks to the imagined inelasticity of, or limits on, the global narcotics supply. In practice, however, when suppression reduces the opium supply from one area (Burma or Thailand), the global price just rises, spurring traders and growers to sell off stocks, old growers to plant more, and new areas (Colombia) to enter production. In addition, such repression usually only increases consumption. If drug seizures, for instance, raise the street price, then addicted consumers will maintain their habit by cutting other expenses (food, rent) or raising their income by dealing drugs to new users and so expanding the trade. Instead of reducing the traffic, the drug war has actually helped stimulate that 10-fold increase in global opium production and a parallel surge in U.S. heroin users from just 68,000 in 1970 to 886,000 in 2017. By attacking supply and failing to treat demand, the U.N.-U.S. drug war has been pursuing a “solution” to drugs that defies the immutable law of supply and demand. As a result, Washington’s drug war has, in the past 50 years, gone from defeat to debacle. The Domestic Influence of Illicit Drugs That drug war has, however, incredible staying power. It has persisted despite decades of failure because of an underlying partisan logic. In 1973, while President Richard Nixon was still fighting his drug war in Turkey and Thailand, New York’s Republican governor, Nelson Rockefeller, enacted the notorious “Rockefeller Drug Laws.” Those included mandatory penalties of 15 years to life for the possession of just four ounces of narcotics. As the police swept inner-city streets for low-level offenders, annual prison sentences in New York State for drug crimes surged from only 470 in 1970 to a peak of 8,500 in 1999, with African-Americans representing 90% of those incarcerated. By then, New York’s state prisons held a previously unimaginable 73,000 people. During the 1980s, President Ronald Reagan, a conservative Republican, dusted off Rockefeller’s anti-drug campaign for intensified domestic enforcement, calling for a “national crusade” against drugs and winning draconian federal penalties for personal drug use and small-scale dealing. For the previous 50 years, the U.S. prison population had remained remarkably stable at just 110 prisoners per 100,000 people. The new drug war, however, doubled those prisoners from 370,000 in 1981 to 713,000 in 1989. Driven by Reagan-era drug laws and parallel state legislation, prison inmates soared to 2.3 million by 2008, raising the country’s incarceration rate to an extraordinary 751 prisoners per 100,000 population. And 51% of those in federal penitentiaries were there for drug offenses. Such mass incarceration has led as well to significant disenfranchisement, starting a trend that would, by 2012, deny the vote to nearly six million people, including 8% of all African-American voting-age adults, a liberal constituency that had gone overwhelmingly Democratic for more than half a century. In addition, this carceral regime concentrated its prison populations, including guards and other prison workers, in conservative rural districts of the country, creating something akin to latter-day “rotten boroughs” for the Republican Party. Take, for example, New York’s 21st Congressional District, which covers the Adirondacks and the state’s heavily forested northern panhandle. It’s home to 14 state prisons, including some 16,000 inmates, 5,000 employees, and their 8,000 family members — making them collectively the district’s largest employer and a defining political presence. Add in the 13,000 or so troops in nearby Fort Drum and you have a reliably conservative bloc of 26,000 voters (and 16,000 non-voters), or the largest political force in a district where only 240,000 residents actually vote. Not surprisingly, the incumbent Republican congresswoman survived the 2018 blue wave to win handily with 56% of the vote. (So never say that the drug war had no effect.) So successful were Reagan Republicans in framing this partisan drug policy as a moral imperative that two of his liberal Democratic successors, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama, avoided any serious reform of it. Instead of systemic change, Obama offered clemency to about 1,700 convicts, an insignificant handful among the hundreds of thousands still locked up for non-violent drug offenses. While partisan paralysis at the federal level has blocked change, the separate states, forced to bear the rising costs of incarceration, have slowly begun reducing prison populations. In a November 2018 ballot measure, for instance, Florida — where the 2000 presidential election was decided by just 537 ballots — voted to restore electoral rights to the state’s 1.4 million felons, including 400,000 African-Americans. No sooner did that plebiscite pass, however, than Florida’s Republican legislators desperately tried to claw back that defeat by requiring that the same felons pay fines and court costs before returning to the electoral rolls. Not only does the drug war influence U.S. politics in all sorts of negative ways but it has reshaped American society — and not for the better, either. The surprising role of illicit drug distribution in ordering life inside some of the country’s major cities has been illuminated in a careful study by a University of Chicago researcher who gained access to the financial records of a drug gang inside Chicago’s impoverished Southside housing projects. He found that, in 2005, the Black Gangster Disciple Nation, known as GD, had about 120 bosses who employed 5,300 young men, largely as street dealers, and had another 20,000 members aspiring to those very jobs. While the boss of each of the gang’s hundred crews earned about $100,000 annually, his three officers made just $7.00 an hour, his 50 street dealers only $3.30 an hour, and their hundreds of other members served as unpaid apprentices, vying for entry-level slots when street dealers were killed, a fate which one in four regularly suffered. So what does all this mean? In an impoverished inner city with very limited job opportunities, this drug gang provided high-mortality employment on a par with the minimum wage (then $5.15 a hour) that their peers in more affluent neighborhoods earned from much safer work at McDonald’s. Moreover, with some 25,000 members in Southside Chicago, GD was providing social order for young men in the volatile 16-to-30 age cohort — minimizing random violence, reducing petty crime, and helping Chicago maintain its gloss as a world-class business center. Until there is sufficient education and employment in the nation’s cities, the illicit drug market will continue to fill the void with work that carries a high cost in violence, addiction, imprisonment, and more generally blighted lives. The End of Drug Prohibition As the global prohibition effort enters its second century, we are witnessing two countervailing trends. The very idea of a prohibition regime has reached a crescendo of dead-end violence not just in Afghanistan but recently in Southeast Asia, demonstrating the failure of the drug war’s repression strategy. In 2003, Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra launched a campaign against methamphetamine abuse that prompted his police to carry out 2,275 extrajudicial killings in just three months. Carrying that coercive logic to its ultimate conclusion, on his first day as Philippine president in 2016, Rodrigo Duterte ordered an attack on drug trafficking that has since yielded 1.3 million surrenders by dealers and users, 86,000 arrests, and some 20,000 bodies dumped on city streets across the country. Yet drug use remains deeply rooted in the slums of both Bangkok and Manila. On the other side of history’s ledger, the harm-reduction movement led by medical practitioners and community activists worldwide is slowly working to unravel the global prohibition regime. With a 1996 ballot measure, California voters, for instance, started a trend by legalizing medical marijuana sales. By 2018, Oklahoma had become the 30th state to legalize medical cannabis. Following initiatives by Colorado and Washington in 2012, eight more states to date have decriminalized the recreational use of cannabis, long the most widespread of all illicit drugs. Hit by a surge of heroin abuse during the 1980s, Portugal’s government first reacted with repression that, as everywhere else on the planet, did little to stanch rising drug abuse, crime, and infection. Gradually, a network of medical professionals across the country adopted harm-reduction measures that would provide a striking record of proven success. After two decades of this ad hoc trial, in 2001 Portugal decriminalized the possession of all illegal drugs, replacing incarceration with counseling and producing a sustained drop in HIV and hepatitis infections. Projecting this experience into the future, it seems likely that harm-reduction measures will be adopted progressively at local and national levels around the globe, while various endless and unsuccessful wars on drugs are curtailed or abandoned. Perhaps someday a caucus of Republican legislators in some oak-paneled Washington conference room and a choir of U.N. bureaucrats in their glass-towered Vienna headquarters will remain the only apostles preaching the discredited gospel of drug prohibition.
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  • Back in Iowa, Sanders Says Big Ag's Stranglehold a Key Part of 'Major Crisis' Facing Rural America
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/05/04/back-iowa-sanders-says-big-ags-stranglehold-key-part-major-crisis-facing-rural
    Jon Queally, staff writer

    Back on the campaign trail in Iowa over the weekend, 2020 Democratic candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders is set to unveil a major policy vision that will include breaking up powerful agriculture conglomerates as a way to save small farmers and rural communities he says are facing a "major, major crisis."

    While Sanders will deliver a speech at fairgrounds in the town of Osage, he told the Des Moines Register in an interview on Friday that "we have got to make a decision as to whether or not we are comfortable with seeing fewer and fewer large agribusiness industries control commodity after commodity"—a dynamic, he said, he is not "happy about" and one that is undermining rural communities across the country.

    According to the newspaper:

    During his first Iowa trip in early March, [Sanders] targeted "factory farming" and derided the concentration of players from the corn seed market to pork production. Sunday, he plans to expand on those issues and also talk about agriculture's connection to water quality and global climate change.

    Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, often seen as competing for the same slice of liberal voters as Sanders, released her own agricultural policy in late March. She specifically called for federal regulators to break up Tyson, Dow-DuPont and Bayer-Monsanto — some of the key players in Iowa's ag economy.

    Asked by the newspaper whether the nation could realistically move back to a system of smaller, family farms, Sanders said he didn't "think we're going to go back to the 1880s," but did say "the heart of rural America is agriculture" and that his campaign intends to focus more on the issue of rural issues and farming in 2020 than they did when he first ran in 2016.

    "I come from a rural state," Sanders said. "It's an issue we probably should have talked about more last time. We will do that this time."

    According to the newspaper, Sanders said it is time for the nation to push for major changes to the entire food production system.

    As Bill Neidhardt, spokesperson for the campaign, put it, Sanders believes the "rural way of life needs to be preserved both in his home state of Vermont and across Iowa," and in order to achieve that, the senator's speech—which will reportedly address corporate control over agriculture, fair trade deals, support for new farmers, climate change, clean water, rural education, rural health care and immigration—"will call for major, structural changes to the agricultural economy."
    Back in Iowa, Sanders Says Big Ag's Stranglehold a Key Part of 'Major Crisis' Facing Rural America https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/05/04/back-iowa-sanders-says-big-ags-stranglehold-key-part-major-crisis-facing-rural Jon Queally, staff writer Back on the campaign trail in Iowa over the weekend, 2020 Democratic candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders is set to unveil a major policy vision that will include breaking up powerful agriculture conglomerates as a way to save small farmers and rural communities he says are facing a "major, major crisis." While Sanders will deliver a speech at fairgrounds in the town of Osage, he told the Des Moines Register in an interview on Friday that "we have got to make a decision as to whether or not we are comfortable with seeing fewer and fewer large agribusiness industries control commodity after commodity"—a dynamic, he said, he is not "happy about" and one that is undermining rural communities across the country. According to the newspaper: During his first Iowa trip in early March, [Sanders] targeted "factory farming" and derided the concentration of players from the corn seed market to pork production. Sunday, he plans to expand on those issues and also talk about agriculture's connection to water quality and global climate change. Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, often seen as competing for the same slice of liberal voters as Sanders, released her own agricultural policy in late March. She specifically called for federal regulators to break up Tyson, Dow-DuPont and Bayer-Monsanto — some of the key players in Iowa's ag economy. Asked by the newspaper whether the nation could realistically move back to a system of smaller, family farms, Sanders said he didn't "think we're going to go back to the 1880s," but did say "the heart of rural America is agriculture" and that his campaign intends to focus more on the issue of rural issues and farming in 2020 than they did when he first ran in 2016. "I come from a rural state," Sanders said. "It's an issue we probably should have talked about more last time. We will do that this time." According to the newspaper, Sanders said it is time for the nation to push for major changes to the entire food production system. As Bill Neidhardt, spokesperson for the campaign, put it, Sanders believes the "rural way of life needs to be preserved both in his home state of Vermont and across Iowa," and in order to achieve that, the senator's speech—which will reportedly address corporate control over agriculture, fair trade deals, support for new farmers, climate change, clean water, rural education, rural health care and immigration—"will call for major, structural changes to the agricultural economy."
    Back in Iowa, Sanders Says Big Ag's Stranglehold a Key Part of 'Major Crisis' Facing Rural America
    With a major speech on Sunday, 2020 candidate will set forth policy vision to save small farmers and rural communities
    WWW.COMMONDREAMS.ORG
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  • FLORES: Yellow Vests – INTO THE STORM – Creating A Post-Replacement
    https://youtu.be/VnWkXobKggQ
    By Joaquin Flores Last 3/25/19

    The scenes depicted in ‘Into the Storm, The Heart of a Popular Revolution’ are not scenes from the prescient film ‘Children of Men‘, though they very well could be from its prequel. ‘Children of Men‘ appears to be the precognitively derived sequel to the Yellow Vest Protests. What interesting times we are living in.

    Contrary to Anglophone presentations depicting the great replacement theory as a fringe theory, the great replacement theory is viewed as an accurate description of the present situation in France by a considerable number of French people.

    ‘Children of Men‘ depicts future events wherein a perfect storm of ecologic, political, epidemiologic and economic catastrophes combine to produce global destabilization.

    In France it is visible in the film as well; that a part of this senseless chaos is a bloody stalemate war between jihadists fighting french nationals.

    Regardless of one’s views of Islam, immigration, corruption, austerity, wage slavery, unemployment, or elements of the Yellow Vest protests – which should not be understood as chiefly Islamophobic, but rather socio-political in nature – it is a matter of key import that a significant number of French people find the general theory of the Great Replacement to be more credible than not.

    It is quite noteworthy to us that the alleged Christchurch shooter is said to have written a manifesto entitled the Great Replacement, and that the Atlantic Council – the media wing of NATO which has promoted open-border policy within EU vectors – was first to point out through its Washington Post vehicle on the same day of the attack, as if they had been ready for it, that the Great Replacement theory of Renaud Camus was, in their editorial opinion, likely to have inspired the alleged shooter.

    As we noted in our prior write-ups on this event, these are aimed at painting with a very broad brush, and convicting current and potential activists with the pre-crime of association by notional abstraction.

    The troublesome introduction of pre-crime prevention is necessarily a product of the techno-industrial leviathan which we face in our every day lives.

    It forces conscientious objectors to the war upon our lives, to respond not by acquiescence, but by resistance based upon the principles of non-aggression. It means that each of us willing to make a difference must become Political Soldiers, as the Yellow Vests have shown and are showing.

    This brings us to an age old truth – people are only responsible for their own words and advocacy, not what others do with their own misunderstandings, and less what third parties still will make unfounded accusations about.

    For Renaud Camus himself openly and clearly denounced the NZ terrorism immediately.

    Renaud Camus has always called for political mobilization of civil society, through constitutional forces, never through murder, violence, terrorism, or intimidation.

    The evidence can be found at the end of his propaganda narrative, visible here: (https://youtu.be/IQUwcYwMYVY)

    If you found that compelling, good. This is how propaganda is done when done well. At the same time, it creates ideological traps, which lead towards a false view of history and the present situation.

    There are some narrative problems in Camus’ own understanding of history, falling into the area of romanticism and logical inconsistencies. But in uncovering the problems in Renaud Camus’ tract, we can perhaps educe a better understanding of how to manage a very real crisis.

    You’ll note that he speaks of the ‘greatest crisis in 15 centuries of French history’ – for those unfamiliar, this is a reference perhaps to the Hunnic invasion of Gaul in 451, but it can also refer to the Christianization of the Franks after 496 (!). But are these really crises in the meta-historical sense, or just a part of the quilt which is French (like any other) people’s history?

    So multiple problems arise – the Hungarians have perfectly well integrated the Asian invasion by the Huns, into their national narrative which is today European, which included the pre-Hunnic Alanic and Gothic populations among others.

    Camus takes the concept of a people’s history, and reifies it into a single living entity, as a single being, wherein other streams that in fact create the quilt are instead relegated to the status of foreign living entities that threaten the first.

    But the first, in the case of France, as the case of Hungary, is not the first. For Gothic tribes, and Alanic tribes who peopled Hungary were also of the east, having settled only several centuries before, according to mainstream historical accounts.

    The Gothic Franks only begin to invade and ‘replace’ the population of what is today France, in the three to four centuries following Christ. And yet Alanic tribes were Iranic. The origins of Goths remains a debate, with Teutonic and Sarmatian/Armenic theories raising substantive points in their own respects. But they are not from ‘France’.

    Likewise, the Gaulish peoples – Celtae, Aedui, Arveni, Senones, Sequani, Carnutes are peoples were that were ultimately ‘replaced’ by the Gothic Franks. And yet it is not accurate to say ‘replaced’ when in reality these populations mixed.

    But no real-living people were injured in the French mythopoesis of its own history.

    So Camus’ line – clearly taken from the film ‘The Matrix‘, where some history in France may go on but it will no longer be ‘French’ history, is a forecast which is neither obvious nor established.

    Religious syncretism will, in our view, ultimately be what any sovereignty-based French deep-state will have to develop, but this will come only when France is free of trans-Atlantic and usurious forces.

    What we find today in French Catholicism among nationalists, is a strong neo-pagan thread, and this neo-pagan thread still professes itself as ‘culturally Catholic’.

    Meanwhile it is understood that Catholicism was brought to France through Roman conquest, the conquest over the pagan Gauls. But they remained Gauls, until conquered by the Franks. Gauls in the 3rd century were already in the process of being Christianized by the Gaulic Church controlled by Rome, when they were conquered by the Pagan Franks, who in turn began to accept Christianity starting in a serious way with Clovis I in 496. So the problems begin to pile.

    And yet in French mythopoetic processes, we nevertheless are confronted with the fact that France’s story today integrates its pre-Christian past into legitimizing its Christian, its Gaullic past into legitimizing its Frankish, and then to its secular, increasingly Islamic present.

    But there are few French Catholics who either respect Vatican II, or today’s Pope, French are Catholics by way of convention and tradition, culture, but are not proponents of the scandals or doctrinal proscriptions that trouble the Vatican today.

    The very religious French Catholics respect the position of the papacy, and by extension and nominally the Pope as a symbol, but not the occupants of the Vatican since Vatican II.

    Ultimately it is possible that French Catholicism will have to go some way analogous to Eastern Orthodoxy, insofar as they will have to adopt its view of Apostolic succession. In short this means the establishment of a French Patriarch, and that New French Catholicism be evangelical and Chrislamic. Chrislam in future France – we are talking in the somewhat distant future, maybe a century or two – will be a necessary religious-ideological construction to weave into France’s future mythopoetic process, where in the Prophet Mohammed is understood as a Christian Crusader against Saracens and Zoroastrian Persians.

    It will be discovered that much of the Koran is identical to pre-Islamic scripture found in deutero-canonical Eastern Orthodoxy.

    What will not happen is any secularization of Muslims populations – religious radicalism increases among second generation French of MENA region descent, which has been established in numerous studies.

    Moreover, Islamicist radicalism occurs in high numbers from indigenous French converts to Islam. This speaks strongly to the global process of desecularization.

    This is because liberal democracies based in consumerist/commodity lifestyle do not provide enough of the most heart-feeling population a significantly meaningful narrative.

    In this way, ‘replacement’ can be understood different;y, exposed for its flaws, and the opportunism inherent in the promotion of the ‘Clash of Civilizations‘ narrative can be placed into day-light.

    But this will mean that France will require a narrative-driven raison d’être beyond capitalism, liberalism, and consumer-commodity culture.

    FRN strongly encourages readers to view the phenomenal non-narrative documentary ‘Into the Storm, The Heart of a Popular Revolution’, which is viewable in the below after this text.

    FRN has hitherto only reported on the major moments and events surrounding the Yellow Vest protest, but we will be launching more in depth coverage of this historic moment in French history.

    FRN has happy to announce our exclusive access to Yellow Vest activists, whom you may recognize from their participation in the Donbass revolution as well.

    Will this prove Russia’s interference in France’s democratic process? FRN knows the public is inoculated from those state department talking points.

    The reality is that true Political Soldiers, like those who joined International Brigades in the Donbass, like Texas Bentley or the lads from Unite Continental, are willing to fight the Atlanticist Leviathan both at home, and abroad.

    The struggle against the globalists and their usurious capitalist mode of exploitation, is an international struggle, where the people of all nations have a shared interest in protecting their right to self determination.

    To help us realize this, where we will be publishing in depth interviews from Yellow Vest activists opposed to the Macron enforced Brussels dictatorship, we’d find it a sign that we would be meeting your expectations in so doing if you ‘vote’ for this through our paypal.

    Atlanticist media has already been trying to pain the events in France as influenced either by Russia or by ‘far right’ extremists.

    It is true that pockets of activists have drawn in support from the far right and also the communist and anarchist left.

    But it has been impossible for the Atlanticist powers through their Sorosesque vehicles to successfully operationalize ‘Antifa’ formations against the Yellow Vests.

    As FRN explains in the deep psychology of organized social movements, the vast majority of activists and participants genuinely believe they are operating without any organizational body above them, out of their sight.

    This means that anarchists in France have also participated in the Yellow Vest movements, as has the communist left.

    What has been clearly expressed in France, is that politics has moved beyond ‘left and right’, and has been rightly oriented as a just people versus unjust power politics.

    At the same time, the science of popular revolts has taken some evolutionary steps. The science of both genuine and illegitimate revolts is the same, and it is a mistake to confuse the methods that are necessary for success, for the desirability of the outcomes.

    This means we have seen an increase in the sophistication of the Yellow Vest leaders and organizers, who have to cope with the state’s use of Agent Provocateurs .

    Because the use of Agent Provocateurs is inevitable, and they can be operationalized from both far right and far left sectors based originally on the US’s leave-behind army of Gladio Operatives, it is important that organizers successfully pre-frame events they are going to see, and in so doing successfully inoculate the public.

    Therefore, what would otherwise be seen as the legitimate use of force by the state against provocations, the use of provocateurs by the state to legitimate a crack-down by the very same state is already forecasted and built into the Yellow Vest organizers plans from the start.

    This is turning the Color Revolution tactic used historically by Atlanticist powers, in on itself – legitimate movements must use the science and technology of organizing, deployment, planning, message control, public relations, and related logistical and tactical concerns, in order to find success.

    FRN’s parent organization, the public accessible, non governmental think-tank, the Center for Syncretic Studies, considers it a success of our own work that the science of revolutions is being better explained and exposed to citizens of respective countries at large, for this will both educate them about how to identify these tactics when used against the interests of people, raise the level of discourse and lead to an abandonment of naive or idealistic conceptions of popular uprisings, and therefore better prepare future leaders of genuine popular uprisings about what will need to be done, how to do it, and the stark realities involved.

    “I take you with me in this totally incredible day, where the chaos mixes with the hope, attending an extraordinary violence, in immersion, but also through the specter of my objective, to revive this day which will remain in the history as one of the most violent of the Yellow Vests movement.”
    FLORES: Yellow Vests – INTO THE STORM – Creating A Post-Replacement https://youtu.be/VnWkXobKggQ By Joaquin Flores Last 3/25/19 The scenes depicted in ‘Into the Storm, The Heart of a Popular Revolution’ are not scenes from the prescient film ‘Children of Men‘, though they very well could be from its prequel. ‘Children of Men‘ appears to be the precognitively derived sequel to the Yellow Vest Protests. What interesting times we are living in. Contrary to Anglophone presentations depicting the great replacement theory as a fringe theory, the great replacement theory is viewed as an accurate description of the present situation in France by a considerable number of French people. ‘Children of Men‘ depicts future events wherein a perfect storm of ecologic, political, epidemiologic and economic catastrophes combine to produce global destabilization. In France it is visible in the film as well; that a part of this senseless chaos is a bloody stalemate war between jihadists fighting french nationals. Regardless of one’s views of Islam, immigration, corruption, austerity, wage slavery, unemployment, or elements of the Yellow Vest protests – which should not be understood as chiefly Islamophobic, but rather socio-political in nature – it is a matter of key import that a significant number of French people find the general theory of the Great Replacement to be more credible than not. It is quite noteworthy to us that the alleged Christchurch shooter is said to have written a manifesto entitled the Great Replacement, and that the Atlantic Council – the media wing of NATO which has promoted open-border policy within EU vectors – was first to point out through its Washington Post vehicle on the same day of the attack, as if they had been ready for it, that the Great Replacement theory of Renaud Camus was, in their editorial opinion, likely to have inspired the alleged shooter. As we noted in our prior write-ups on this event, these are aimed at painting with a very broad brush, and convicting current and potential activists with the pre-crime of association by notional abstraction. The troublesome introduction of pre-crime prevention is necessarily a product of the techno-industrial leviathan which we face in our every day lives. It forces conscientious objectors to the war upon our lives, to respond not by acquiescence, but by resistance based upon the principles of non-aggression. It means that each of us willing to make a difference must become Political Soldiers, as the Yellow Vests have shown and are showing. This brings us to an age old truth – people are only responsible for their own words and advocacy, not what others do with their own misunderstandings, and less what third parties still will make unfounded accusations about. For Renaud Camus himself openly and clearly denounced the NZ terrorism immediately. Renaud Camus has always called for political mobilization of civil society, through constitutional forces, never through murder, violence, terrorism, or intimidation. The evidence can be found at the end of his propaganda narrative, visible here: (https://youtu.be/IQUwcYwMYVY) If you found that compelling, good. This is how propaganda is done when done well. At the same time, it creates ideological traps, which lead towards a false view of history and the present situation. There are some narrative problems in Camus’ own understanding of history, falling into the area of romanticism and logical inconsistencies. But in uncovering the problems in Renaud Camus’ tract, we can perhaps educe a better understanding of how to manage a very real crisis. You’ll note that he speaks of the ‘greatest crisis in 15 centuries of French history’ – for those unfamiliar, this is a reference perhaps to the Hunnic invasion of Gaul in 451, but it can also refer to the Christianization of the Franks after 496 (!). But are these really crises in the meta-historical sense, or just a part of the quilt which is French (like any other) people’s history? So multiple problems arise – the Hungarians have perfectly well integrated the Asian invasion by the Huns, into their national narrative which is today European, which included the pre-Hunnic Alanic and Gothic populations among others. Camus takes the concept of a people’s history, and reifies it into a single living entity, as a single being, wherein other streams that in fact create the quilt are instead relegated to the status of foreign living entities that threaten the first. But the first, in the case of France, as the case of Hungary, is not the first. For Gothic tribes, and Alanic tribes who peopled Hungary were also of the east, having settled only several centuries before, according to mainstream historical accounts. The Gothic Franks only begin to invade and ‘replace’ the population of what is today France, in the three to four centuries following Christ. And yet Alanic tribes were Iranic. The origins of Goths remains a debate, with Teutonic and Sarmatian/Armenic theories raising substantive points in their own respects. But they are not from ‘France’. Likewise, the Gaulish peoples – Celtae, Aedui, Arveni, Senones, Sequani, Carnutes are peoples were that were ultimately ‘replaced’ by the Gothic Franks. And yet it is not accurate to say ‘replaced’ when in reality these populations mixed. But no real-living people were injured in the French mythopoesis of its own history. So Camus’ line – clearly taken from the film ‘The Matrix‘, where some history in France may go on but it will no longer be ‘French’ history, is a forecast which is neither obvious nor established. Religious syncretism will, in our view, ultimately be what any sovereignty-based French deep-state will have to develop, but this will come only when France is free of trans-Atlantic and usurious forces. What we find today in French Catholicism among nationalists, is a strong neo-pagan thread, and this neo-pagan thread still professes itself as ‘culturally Catholic’. Meanwhile it is understood that Catholicism was brought to France through Roman conquest, the conquest over the pagan Gauls. But they remained Gauls, until conquered by the Franks. Gauls in the 3rd century were already in the process of being Christianized by the Gaulic Church controlled by Rome, when they were conquered by the Pagan Franks, who in turn began to accept Christianity starting in a serious way with Clovis I in 496. So the problems begin to pile. And yet in French mythopoetic processes, we nevertheless are confronted with the fact that France’s story today integrates its pre-Christian past into legitimizing its Christian, its Gaullic past into legitimizing its Frankish, and then to its secular, increasingly Islamic present. But there are few French Catholics who either respect Vatican II, or today’s Pope, French are Catholics by way of convention and tradition, culture, but are not proponents of the scandals or doctrinal proscriptions that trouble the Vatican today. The very religious French Catholics respect the position of the papacy, and by extension and nominally the Pope as a symbol, but not the occupants of the Vatican since Vatican II. Ultimately it is possible that French Catholicism will have to go some way analogous to Eastern Orthodoxy, insofar as they will have to adopt its view of Apostolic succession. In short this means the establishment of a French Patriarch, and that New French Catholicism be evangelical and Chrislamic. Chrislam in future France – we are talking in the somewhat distant future, maybe a century or two – will be a necessary religious-ideological construction to weave into France’s future mythopoetic process, where in the Prophet Mohammed is understood as a Christian Crusader against Saracens and Zoroastrian Persians. It will be discovered that much of the Koran is identical to pre-Islamic scripture found in deutero-canonical Eastern Orthodoxy. What will not happen is any secularization of Muslims populations – religious radicalism increases among second generation French of MENA region descent, which has been established in numerous studies. Moreover, Islamicist radicalism occurs in high numbers from indigenous French converts to Islam. This speaks strongly to the global process of desecularization. This is because liberal democracies based in consumerist/commodity lifestyle do not provide enough of the most heart-feeling population a significantly meaningful narrative. In this way, ‘replacement’ can be understood different;y, exposed for its flaws, and the opportunism inherent in the promotion of the ‘Clash of Civilizations‘ narrative can be placed into day-light. But this will mean that France will require a narrative-driven raison d’être beyond capitalism, liberalism, and consumer-commodity culture. FRN strongly encourages readers to view the phenomenal non-narrative documentary ‘Into the Storm, The Heart of a Popular Revolution’, which is viewable in the below after this text. FRN has hitherto only reported on the major moments and events surrounding the Yellow Vest protest, but we will be launching more in depth coverage of this historic moment in French history. FRN has happy to announce our exclusive access to Yellow Vest activists, whom you may recognize from their participation in the Donbass revolution as well. Will this prove Russia’s interference in France’s democratic process? FRN knows the public is inoculated from those state department talking points. The reality is that true Political Soldiers, like those who joined International Brigades in the Donbass, like Texas Bentley or the lads from Unite Continental, are willing to fight the Atlanticist Leviathan both at home, and abroad. The struggle against the globalists and their usurious capitalist mode of exploitation, is an international struggle, where the people of all nations have a shared interest in protecting their right to self determination. To help us realize this, where we will be publishing in depth interviews from Yellow Vest activists opposed to the Macron enforced Brussels dictatorship, we’d find it a sign that we would be meeting your expectations in so doing if you ‘vote’ for this through our paypal. Atlanticist media has already been trying to pain the events in France as influenced either by Russia or by ‘far right’ extremists. It is true that pockets of activists have drawn in support from the far right and also the communist and anarchist left. But it has been impossible for the Atlanticist powers through their Sorosesque vehicles to successfully operationalize ‘Antifa’ formations against the Yellow Vests. As FRN explains in the deep psychology of organized social movements, the vast majority of activists and participants genuinely believe they are operating without any organizational body above them, out of their sight. This means that anarchists in France have also participated in the Yellow Vest movements, as has the communist left. What has been clearly expressed in France, is that politics has moved beyond ‘left and right’, and has been rightly oriented as a just people versus unjust power politics. At the same time, the science of popular revolts has taken some evolutionary steps. The science of both genuine and illegitimate revolts is the same, and it is a mistake to confuse the methods that are necessary for success, for the desirability of the outcomes. This means we have seen an increase in the sophistication of the Yellow Vest leaders and organizers, who have to cope with the state’s use of Agent Provocateurs . Because the use of Agent Provocateurs is inevitable, and they can be operationalized from both far right and far left sectors based originally on the US’s leave-behind army of Gladio Operatives, it is important that organizers successfully pre-frame events they are going to see, and in so doing successfully inoculate the public. Therefore, what would otherwise be seen as the legitimate use of force by the state against provocations, the use of provocateurs by the state to legitimate a crack-down by the very same state is already forecasted and built into the Yellow Vest organizers plans from the start. This is turning the Color Revolution tactic used historically by Atlanticist powers, in on itself – legitimate movements must use the science and technology of organizing, deployment, planning, message control, public relations, and related logistical and tactical concerns, in order to find success. FRN’s parent organization, the public accessible, non governmental think-tank, the Center for Syncretic Studies, considers it a success of our own work that the science of revolutions is being better explained and exposed to citizens of respective countries at large, for this will both educate them about how to identify these tactics when used against the interests of people, raise the level of discourse and lead to an abandonment of naive or idealistic conceptions of popular uprisings, and therefore better prepare future leaders of genuine popular uprisings about what will need to be done, how to do it, and the stark realities involved. “I take you with me in this totally incredible day, where the chaos mixes with the hope, attending an extraordinary violence, in immersion, but also through the specter of my objective, to revive this day which will remain in the history as one of the most violent of the Yellow Vests movement.”
    Yellow Vests act 18 - INTO THE STORM - Au coeur d’une révolution populaire
    INTO THE STORM - Au coeur d’une révolution populaire Je vous entraine avec moi dans cette journée totalement incroyable, où le chaos se mêle à l’espoir, assi...
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  • #Solitude
    April 1 “And after he had sent the #multitudes away, He went up to the #mountain by #Himself to #pray; and when it was #evening, He was there #alone.” #Matthew14:23
    Listen to #todaysDevotional

    When I was a #boy, we had an #oldRadio that had been in our family for a long time. On occasion, #static would come on that #radio, and my #dad would just smack the side of the radio to make the static go away.

    Could it be that when #storms or #difficulties come into our #lives that #God is just “ #slappingUs” on the side of the head to say, ‘I want you to #slowDown and #getQuiet, just for a moment, because I have something to say and you’re so filled with static you can’t hear Me #speak.’” Build a little #silence into #yourLife #today. #GoOutside with a cup of #coffee, or #stepOutside at night and just #breathe in the #nightAir. Solitude is a #rare #commodity, but how we need it in our #dailyLives. https://mailchi.mp/winningwalk/the-truest-freedom-you-can-ever-experience-452153?e=9cbe669f39 #dailyinspiration #dailymotivation #Jesus #belief #faith #DailyDevotion #DailyDevotional #Devotions #Devotional #BibleStudy #GodIsLove #AlmightyGod #TheOneTrueGod #JesusChrist #Christ #Jesus #GodIsOne #YHWH #Jehovah #Listen #TuningIn #TunedIn #Messiah #HolySpirit #WakeUp #Discipline
    #Solitude April 1 “And after he had sent the #multitudes away, He went up to the #mountain by #Himself to #pray; and when it was #evening, He was there #alone.” #Matthew14:23 Listen to #todaysDevotional When I was a #boy, we had an #oldRadio that had been in our family for a long time. On occasion, #static would come on that #radio, and my #dad would just smack the side of the radio to make the static go away. Could it be that when #storms or #difficulties come into our #lives that #God is just “ #slappingUs” on the side of the head to say, ‘I want you to #slowDown and #getQuiet, just for a moment, because I have something to say and you’re so filled with static you can’t hear Me #speak.’” Build a little #silence into #yourLife #today. #GoOutside with a cup of #coffee, or #stepOutside at night and just #breathe in the #nightAir. Solitude is a #rare #commodity, but how we need it in our #dailyLives. https://mailchi.mp/winningwalk/the-truest-freedom-you-can-ever-experience-452153?e=9cbe669f39 #dailyinspiration #dailymotivation #Jesus #belief #faith #DailyDevotion #DailyDevotional #Devotions #Devotional #BibleStudy #GodIsLove #AlmightyGod #TheOneTrueGod #JesusChrist #Christ #Jesus #GodIsOne #YHWH #Jehovah #Listen #TuningIn #TunedIn #Messiah #HolySpirit #WakeUp #Discipline
    Solitude
    Build a little silence into your life today.
    MAILCHI.MP
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