• https://news.acdemocracy.org/toronto-mayor-john-tory-encourages-canadians-to-learn-more-about-islam/?fbclid=IwAR3NcldSeGNu91keidAINNUcFZari2Q4sFJd56CmDz21aG9VGTLm8huwJuc On October 1, 2019 Toronto Mayor John Tory proclaimed October as Islamic Heritage Month in Toronto.
    https://news.acdemocracy.org/toronto-mayor-john-tory-encourages-canadians-to-learn-more-about-islam/?fbclid=IwAR3NcldSeGNu91keidAINNUcFZari2Q4sFJd56CmDz21aG9VGTLm8huwJuc On October 1, 2019 Toronto Mayor John Tory proclaimed October as Islamic Heritage Month in Toronto.
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  • Greta Thunberg Proclaimed 'Successor' Of Jesus Christ By Church Of Sweden | Sacrilege, Heretical, Apostate!

    https://www.teaparty.org/greta-thunberg-proclaimed-successor-of-jesus-christ-by-church-of-sweden-411870/
    Greta Thunberg Proclaimed 'Successor' Of Jesus Christ By Church Of Sweden | Sacrilege, Heretical, Apostate! https://www.teaparty.org/greta-thunberg-proclaimed-successor-of-jesus-christ-by-church-of-sweden-411870/
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  • Make America Greta Again
    https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/09/30/make-america-greta-again
    Tom Engelhardt

    Look what Greta started and what she did to me! I took part in the recent climate-strike march in New York City -- one of a quarter-million people (or maybe 60,000) who turned out there, along with four million others across all seven continents. Then I came home and promptly collapsed. Which tells you one thing: I'm not 16 years old like Greta Thunberg, the Swedish teen who almost singlehandedly roused a sleeping planet and is now described as “the Joan of Arc of climate change.” Nor am I the age of just about any of the demonstrators I stopped to chat with that afternoon, however briefly, while madly scribbling down their inventive protest signs in a little notebook.

    But don’t think I was out of place either. After all, the kids had called on adults to turn out that day and offer them some support. They understandably wanted to know that someone -- other than themselves (and a bunch of scientists) -- was truly paying attention to the global toilet down which their future was headed. I’m 75 and proud to say that I was walking that Friday with three friends, two of whom were older than me, amid vast crowds of enthusiastic, drum-beating, guitar-playing, chanting, shouting, climate-striking kids and their supporters of every age and hue. The streets of downtown Manhattan Island were so packed that sometimes, in the blazing sun of that September afternoon, we were barely inching along.

    It was impressive, exuberant, and, yes, let me say it again, exhausting. And that sun, beautiful as it was, didn’t help at all. At one point, I was so warm that I even stripped down to my T-shirt. I have to admit, though, that I felt that orb was shining so brightly at the behest of those young school strikers to make a point about what planet we were now on. It was about 80 degrees Fahrenheit during that march, which fortunately was to a park on the tip of Manhattan, not to somewhere in Jacobabad, Pakistan, now possibly the hottest city on Earth (and growing hotter by the year) with a temperature that only recently hit 124 degrees Fahrenheit.

    That night, back in my living room, I slumped on the sofa, pillows packed behind me, and turned on NBC Nightly News to watch anchor Lester Holt report on the breaking stories of that historic day in which climate strikers and their supporters had turned out in staggering numbers from distant Pacific islands to Africa, Europe, the Americas, and -- yes -- Antarctica. Even -- bless them -- a small group of young Afghans in that desperately embattled land was somehow still capable of thinking about the future of our planet and risked their lives to demonstrate! “I want to march because if I don't survive this war,” said Sarah Azizi, one of those Afghans, “at least I would have done something for the next generation that they can survive." (Where, though, were the Chinese demonstrators in a country that now releases more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere than any other, though the U.S. remains by far the largest emitter in history?)

    Let me add one thing: I’m a religious viewer of Lester Holt or at least what I can take of his show (usually about 15 minutes or so). The reason? Because I feel it gives me a sense of what an aging slice of Americans take in as the “news” daily on our increasingly embattled planet. If you happen to be one of the striking school kids with a certain perspective on the adults who have gotten us into our present global fix, then you won’t be shocked to learn that those “Fridays for Future” global demonstrations proved to be the sixth story of the day on that broadcast. But hey, who can blame Lester Holt & Co? (“Tonight, several breaking headlines as we come on the air!”) After all, not far from Chicago, an SUV (“Breaking news! Shocking video!”) had busted ever so photogenically into a mall and rambled around for a while knocking things over (but hurting no one) before the driver was arrested. No comparison with millions of human beings going on strike over the heating of a planet on which life forms of every sort are in increasing jeopardy.

    Then, of course, there was story number two: the “deadly tour bus crash” in Utah (“Also breaking, the highway horror!”) that killed four people near a national park. Hey, no comparison with a planet going down. Then there was the obvious crucial third story of the night, the “surprise move” of football’s New England Patriots to drop Antonio Brown, “the superstar facing sexual misconduct allegations,” from their roster. Fourth came an actual weather emergency, “the growing disaster, a new round of relentless rain on the Texas coast, the catastrophic cutting-off of communities, the death toll rising!” And staggering downpours from Tropical Depression Imelda, 40 inches worth in the Houston area, were indeed news. Of course, Lester offered not the slightest hint, despite the demonstrations that day, that there might be any connection between the seventh-wettest tropical cyclone in U.S. history and climate change. And then, of course, there was Donald Trump. (“Allegations President Trump pressured Ukraine’s leader eight times in a single phone call to investigate the son of rival Joe Biden!”) He’s everywhere and would probably have been bitter, had he noticed, to come in a rare and distant fifth that night. He was expectably shown sitting in his usual lost-boy pose (hands between legs, leaning forward), denying that this latest “whistleblower firestorm” meant anything at all. And finally, sixth and truly last, at least in the introductory line-up of stories to come, was humanity’s “firestorm” and the children who, unlike the grown-ups of NBC Nightly News, actually grasp the importance of what’s happening to this planet and so many of the species on it, themselves included. (“...And walking out of class, millions of students demanding action on climate change...”)

    As I’ve written elsewhere, this sort of coverage is beginning to change as, in 2019, the climate crisis enters our world in a far more obvious way. Still, it’s fairly typical of how the grownups of this planet have acted in these years, typical of what initially upset Greta Thunberg. Admittedly, even that day and the next, there was far better coverage to be found in the mainstream media. The Guardian, for instance, impressively streamed climate-crisis news all day and, that evening, the PBS NewsHour made it at least a decently covered second story of the day (after, well, you-know-who and that secret whistleblower). Meanwhile, a new initiative launched by the Columbia Journalism Review and the Nation magazine to heighten coverage of the subject has already drawn at least 300 outlets globally as partners. (Even Lester Holt has begun giving it a little more attention.)

    And though it may not be timely enough, change is coming in polling, in the media, and elsewhere, and those children I saw marching in such profusion that day will indeed help make it happen. Opinion will continue to change in the heat of the oncoming moment, as in the end will governments, and that will matter, even if not as fast as would be either useful or advisable.

    "Don’t Be a Fossil Fool"

    Let me stop now and look back on that New York demonstration, more than a week gone, where, at one point, people all around me waving hand-made blue signs visibly meant to be ocean waves were chanting, “Sea levels are rising and so are we!”

    To understand what’s happening on this planet of ours from the bottom up, what our future might truly hold in a post-Trumpian world (that’s still a world), I wish you could have spent a little time, as I did that day, with those marchers. But I think there’s a way you still can. As I mentioned, I spent those hours, in part, feverishly jotting down what was written on the endless array of protest signs -- some held, some pasted onto or slung over shirts, some, in fact, actual T-shirts (“No More B[oil], Leave it in the ground”). Some had clearly been professionally printed up. (Perfect for the age of Trump, for instance: “The universe is made of protons, neutrons, electrons, and morons.”) Many were, as participants told me, not original but slogans found online and turned into personal expressions of feeling, often with plenty of decoration. That would, for instance, include the mock-Trumpian “Make America Greta Again” and “There Is No Plan[et] B. Green New Deal!”).

    Many of the signs were, however, clearly original, some done with ultimate care, others scrawled wildly. Some were profane (“Fuck Trump, the Earth is Dying!” from a 14-year-old boy or “Clean the Earth, it’s not Uranus”); some were starkly blunt (“Act now before the show is over”); some politically oriented (“We’re not red or blue, we’re green”); some pop-culturally on target (“Winter is not coming”); some wry (“Don’t be a Fossil Fool”); some politically of the moment (“Real science, Fake president,” “Less AC, More AOC”); some critiques of capitalism (“If we can save the banks, we can save the world,” “We can’t eat money, we can’t drink oil”); some wise (“The climate is changing, why aren’t we?”); some culturally sly (“#MeToo, said Mother Earth”); or clever indeed (“This sign is reusable, STOP AND THINK”).

    There were those two kids I ran into. The younger, a girl of 10, was carrying a homemade sign that said, “Dear Donald, Hate to break it to you, but climate change is real. XOXO Love, Earth”; her brother, 14, held up a two-word sign all his own that simply said, “Mulch Trump.” Touché! A college student’s sign read, “I am studying for a future that is being destroyed.” A 20-year-old woman held one that said, pungently enough in our present American universe, “Eco not Ego.”

    A boy, 8, was blunt: “Save our future.” An 11-year-old girl no less blunt: “If you won’t act like adults, we will.” A 10-year-old boy had written plaintively: “I’m too old 2 die,” while another, a year older, offered this mordant message: “I don’t want to live on Mars. I want to live in Manhattan 30 years from now.” Many signs were, in their own way, upbeat, but some were deeply dystopian as in one woman’s that said: “Don’t think of this summer as the HOTTEST summer in the last 125 years. Think of it as the coolest summer of the NEXT 125 years.”

    There was the woman with a sign that read “Science is not a liberal conspiracy.” When my friend congratulated her on it, she responded, “I wish I hadn’t been wearing this sign for seven years!” There was the woman carrying a sign that proclaimed, “Here for my son’s future.” Mounted on it was a photo of a bright-looking baby boy. When asked, she assured me with a smile that he was indeed her child whom she had given this line: “Mom, why didn’t you do more?”

    And if you don’t think this -- multiplied by millions across the planet -- is hopeful, despite heatmongers like Donald Trump and Brazil's Jair Bolsonaro now being in power, think again.

    Let me assure you, I know what it feels like when a movement is ending, when you’re watching a nightmare as if in the rearview mirror, when people are ready to turn their backs on some horror and pretend it’s not happening. That was certainly what it felt like as the streets emptied of demonstrators in 2003 -- and there had indeed been millions of them across the planet then, too -- in the wake of the Bush administration's invasion of Iraq. It will not, however, be as easy to turn away from climate change as it was from the Iraq War and its consequences (if, at least, you didn’t live in the Middle East).

    The new climate crisis movement is, I suspect, neither a flash in the pan (since global warming will ensure that our “pan” only gets hotter in the years to come), nor a movement about to die. It’s visibly a movement being born.

    There was the 63-year-old grandmother carrying a sign that said: “I want my granddaughter to have a future! She’s due on February 1, 2020.” My heart went out to her, because the afternoons I spend with my own grandson are the joys of my life. (He was marching elsewhere that day in a self-decorated T-shirt that said, "Plant more trees.") Yet there’s seldom one of those afternoons when, at some unexpected moment, my heart doesn’t suddenly sink as I think about the planet I’m leaving him on.

    So, even at my age, that march meant something deep and true to me. Just being there with those kids, a generation that will have to grow up amid fossil-fuelized nightmares whose sponsors, ranging from Big Energy companies to figures like Donald Trump, are intent on committing the greatest crime in human history. It’s certainly strange, not to say horrific, to have so many powerful men (and they are men) intent on quite literally heating this planet to the boiling point for their own profit, political and economic, and so obviously ready to say to hell with the rest of you, to hell with the future.

    So, yes, there’s always the possibility that civilization as we know it might be in the process of ending on this planet. But there’s another possibility as well, one lodged in the living hopes and dreams of all those kids across a world that is already, in a sense, beginning to burn. It’s the possibility that something else is beginning, too. And it’s never too late for something new. Increasing numbers of the young are now starting to make demands and, in the wake of that march, I have the feeling that the demanding won’t stop until they get at least some of what they want -- and the rest of us so desperately need.

    In the end, I’m with the eight-year-old boy who had clipped (quite literally) to the back of his T-shirt what may have been my favorite sign of the march. Begun by him but obviously partially written out by an adult at his inspiration (and then decorated by him), it said: “I’m not cleaning up my room until the grownups clean up the planet -- and I mean it!”

    As well he should!
    Make America Greta Again https://www.commondreams.org/views/2019/09/30/make-america-greta-again Tom Engelhardt Look what Greta started and what she did to me! I took part in the recent climate-strike march in New York City -- one of a quarter-million people (or maybe 60,000) who turned out there, along with four million others across all seven continents. Then I came home and promptly collapsed. Which tells you one thing: I'm not 16 years old like Greta Thunberg, the Swedish teen who almost singlehandedly roused a sleeping planet and is now described as “the Joan of Arc of climate change.” Nor am I the age of just about any of the demonstrators I stopped to chat with that afternoon, however briefly, while madly scribbling down their inventive protest signs in a little notebook. But don’t think I was out of place either. After all, the kids had called on adults to turn out that day and offer them some support. They understandably wanted to know that someone -- other than themselves (and a bunch of scientists) -- was truly paying attention to the global toilet down which their future was headed. I’m 75 and proud to say that I was walking that Friday with three friends, two of whom were older than me, amid vast crowds of enthusiastic, drum-beating, guitar-playing, chanting, shouting, climate-striking kids and their supporters of every age and hue. The streets of downtown Manhattan Island were so packed that sometimes, in the blazing sun of that September afternoon, we were barely inching along. It was impressive, exuberant, and, yes, let me say it again, exhausting. And that sun, beautiful as it was, didn’t help at all. At one point, I was so warm that I even stripped down to my T-shirt. I have to admit, though, that I felt that orb was shining so brightly at the behest of those young school strikers to make a point about what planet we were now on. It was about 80 degrees Fahrenheit during that march, which fortunately was to a park on the tip of Manhattan, not to somewhere in Jacobabad, Pakistan, now possibly the hottest city on Earth (and growing hotter by the year) with a temperature that only recently hit 124 degrees Fahrenheit. That night, back in my living room, I slumped on the sofa, pillows packed behind me, and turned on NBC Nightly News to watch anchor Lester Holt report on the breaking stories of that historic day in which climate strikers and their supporters had turned out in staggering numbers from distant Pacific islands to Africa, Europe, the Americas, and -- yes -- Antarctica. Even -- bless them -- a small group of young Afghans in that desperately embattled land was somehow still capable of thinking about the future of our planet and risked their lives to demonstrate! “I want to march because if I don't survive this war,” said Sarah Azizi, one of those Afghans, “at least I would have done something for the next generation that they can survive." (Where, though, were the Chinese demonstrators in a country that now releases more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere than any other, though the U.S. remains by far the largest emitter in history?) Let me add one thing: I’m a religious viewer of Lester Holt or at least what I can take of his show (usually about 15 minutes or so). The reason? Because I feel it gives me a sense of what an aging slice of Americans take in as the “news” daily on our increasingly embattled planet. If you happen to be one of the striking school kids with a certain perspective on the adults who have gotten us into our present global fix, then you won’t be shocked to learn that those “Fridays for Future” global demonstrations proved to be the sixth story of the day on that broadcast. But hey, who can blame Lester Holt & Co? (“Tonight, several breaking headlines as we come on the air!”) After all, not far from Chicago, an SUV (“Breaking news! Shocking video!”) had busted ever so photogenically into a mall and rambled around for a while knocking things over (but hurting no one) before the driver was arrested. No comparison with millions of human beings going on strike over the heating of a planet on which life forms of every sort are in increasing jeopardy. Then, of course, there was story number two: the “deadly tour bus crash” in Utah (“Also breaking, the highway horror!”) that killed four people near a national park. Hey, no comparison with a planet going down. Then there was the obvious crucial third story of the night, the “surprise move” of football’s New England Patriots to drop Antonio Brown, “the superstar facing sexual misconduct allegations,” from their roster. Fourth came an actual weather emergency, “the growing disaster, a new round of relentless rain on the Texas coast, the catastrophic cutting-off of communities, the death toll rising!” And staggering downpours from Tropical Depression Imelda, 40 inches worth in the Houston area, were indeed news. Of course, Lester offered not the slightest hint, despite the demonstrations that day, that there might be any connection between the seventh-wettest tropical cyclone in U.S. history and climate change. And then, of course, there was Donald Trump. (“Allegations President Trump pressured Ukraine’s leader eight times in a single phone call to investigate the son of rival Joe Biden!”) He’s everywhere and would probably have been bitter, had he noticed, to come in a rare and distant fifth that night. He was expectably shown sitting in his usual lost-boy pose (hands between legs, leaning forward), denying that this latest “whistleblower firestorm” meant anything at all. And finally, sixth and truly last, at least in the introductory line-up of stories to come, was humanity’s “firestorm” and the children who, unlike the grown-ups of NBC Nightly News, actually grasp the importance of what’s happening to this planet and so many of the species on it, themselves included. (“...And walking out of class, millions of students demanding action on climate change...”) As I’ve written elsewhere, this sort of coverage is beginning to change as, in 2019, the climate crisis enters our world in a far more obvious way. Still, it’s fairly typical of how the grownups of this planet have acted in these years, typical of what initially upset Greta Thunberg. Admittedly, even that day and the next, there was far better coverage to be found in the mainstream media. The Guardian, for instance, impressively streamed climate-crisis news all day and, that evening, the PBS NewsHour made it at least a decently covered second story of the day (after, well, you-know-who and that secret whistleblower). Meanwhile, a new initiative launched by the Columbia Journalism Review and the Nation magazine to heighten coverage of the subject has already drawn at least 300 outlets globally as partners. (Even Lester Holt has begun giving it a little more attention.) And though it may not be timely enough, change is coming in polling, in the media, and elsewhere, and those children I saw marching in such profusion that day will indeed help make it happen. Opinion will continue to change in the heat of the oncoming moment, as in the end will governments, and that will matter, even if not as fast as would be either useful or advisable. "Don’t Be a Fossil Fool" Let me stop now and look back on that New York demonstration, more than a week gone, where, at one point, people all around me waving hand-made blue signs visibly meant to be ocean waves were chanting, “Sea levels are rising and so are we!” To understand what’s happening on this planet of ours from the bottom up, what our future might truly hold in a post-Trumpian world (that’s still a world), I wish you could have spent a little time, as I did that day, with those marchers. But I think there’s a way you still can. As I mentioned, I spent those hours, in part, feverishly jotting down what was written on the endless array of protest signs -- some held, some pasted onto or slung over shirts, some, in fact, actual T-shirts (“No More B[oil], Leave it in the ground”). Some had clearly been professionally printed up. (Perfect for the age of Trump, for instance: “The universe is made of protons, neutrons, electrons, and morons.”) Many were, as participants told me, not original but slogans found online and turned into personal expressions of feeling, often with plenty of decoration. That would, for instance, include the mock-Trumpian “Make America Greta Again” and “There Is No Plan[et] B. Green New Deal!”). Many of the signs were, however, clearly original, some done with ultimate care, others scrawled wildly. Some were profane (“Fuck Trump, the Earth is Dying!” from a 14-year-old boy or “Clean the Earth, it’s not Uranus”); some were starkly blunt (“Act now before the show is over”); some politically oriented (“We’re not red or blue, we’re green”); some pop-culturally on target (“Winter is not coming”); some wry (“Don’t be a Fossil Fool”); some politically of the moment (“Real science, Fake president,” “Less AC, More AOC”); some critiques of capitalism (“If we can save the banks, we can save the world,” “We can’t eat money, we can’t drink oil”); some wise (“The climate is changing, why aren’t we?”); some culturally sly (“#MeToo, said Mother Earth”); or clever indeed (“This sign is reusable, STOP AND THINK”). There were those two kids I ran into. The younger, a girl of 10, was carrying a homemade sign that said, “Dear Donald, Hate to break it to you, but climate change is real. XOXO Love, Earth”; her brother, 14, held up a two-word sign all his own that simply said, “Mulch Trump.” Touché! A college student’s sign read, “I am studying for a future that is being destroyed.” A 20-year-old woman held one that said, pungently enough in our present American universe, “Eco not Ego.” A boy, 8, was blunt: “Save our future.” An 11-year-old girl no less blunt: “If you won’t act like adults, we will.” A 10-year-old boy had written plaintively: “I’m too old 2 die,” while another, a year older, offered this mordant message: “I don’t want to live on Mars. I want to live in Manhattan 30 years from now.” Many signs were, in their own way, upbeat, but some were deeply dystopian as in one woman’s that said: “Don’t think of this summer as the HOTTEST summer in the last 125 years. Think of it as the coolest summer of the NEXT 125 years.” There was the woman with a sign that read “Science is not a liberal conspiracy.” When my friend congratulated her on it, she responded, “I wish I hadn’t been wearing this sign for seven years!” There was the woman carrying a sign that proclaimed, “Here for my son’s future.” Mounted on it was a photo of a bright-looking baby boy. When asked, she assured me with a smile that he was indeed her child whom she had given this line: “Mom, why didn’t you do more?” And if you don’t think this -- multiplied by millions across the planet -- is hopeful, despite heatmongers like Donald Trump and Brazil's Jair Bolsonaro now being in power, think again. Let me assure you, I know what it feels like when a movement is ending, when you’re watching a nightmare as if in the rearview mirror, when people are ready to turn their backs on some horror and pretend it’s not happening. That was certainly what it felt like as the streets emptied of demonstrators in 2003 -- and there had indeed been millions of them across the planet then, too -- in the wake of the Bush administration's invasion of Iraq. It will not, however, be as easy to turn away from climate change as it was from the Iraq War and its consequences (if, at least, you didn’t live in the Middle East). The new climate crisis movement is, I suspect, neither a flash in the pan (since global warming will ensure that our “pan” only gets hotter in the years to come), nor a movement about to die. It’s visibly a movement being born. There was the 63-year-old grandmother carrying a sign that said: “I want my granddaughter to have a future! She’s due on February 1, 2020.” My heart went out to her, because the afternoons I spend with my own grandson are the joys of my life. (He was marching elsewhere that day in a self-decorated T-shirt that said, "Plant more trees.") Yet there’s seldom one of those afternoons when, at some unexpected moment, my heart doesn’t suddenly sink as I think about the planet I’m leaving him on. So, even at my age, that march meant something deep and true to me. Just being there with those kids, a generation that will have to grow up amid fossil-fuelized nightmares whose sponsors, ranging from Big Energy companies to figures like Donald Trump, are intent on committing the greatest crime in human history. It’s certainly strange, not to say horrific, to have so many powerful men (and they are men) intent on quite literally heating this planet to the boiling point for their own profit, political and economic, and so obviously ready to say to hell with the rest of you, to hell with the future. So, yes, there’s always the possibility that civilization as we know it might be in the process of ending on this planet. But there’s another possibility as well, one lodged in the living hopes and dreams of all those kids across a world that is already, in a sense, beginning to burn. It’s the possibility that something else is beginning, too. And it’s never too late for something new. Increasing numbers of the young are now starting to make demands and, in the wake of that march, I have the feeling that the demanding won’t stop until they get at least some of what they want -- and the rest of us so desperately need. In the end, I’m with the eight-year-old boy who had clipped (quite literally) to the back of his T-shirt what may have been my favorite sign of the march. Begun by him but obviously partially written out by an adult at his inspiration (and then decorated by him), it said: “I’m not cleaning up my room until the grownups clean up the planet -- and I mean it!” As well he should!
    Make America Greta Again
    "Sea levels are rising and so are we!".. Look what Greta started and what she did to me!
    WWW.COMMONDREAMS.ORG
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  • Worship Him September 12 For the Lord takes pleasure in His people; He will beautify the humble with salvation. Psalm 149:4 Listen to today's Devotional

    One of the major problems with our worship is that we evaluate it by asking the wrong question. For example, we might ask someone who’s attended church: “Did you enjoy worship?” But the point of worship is not that we enjoy it, although we certainly should, but that God enjoys it; that He is pleased and honored by it. So a better question would be, “Did God enjoy your worship?”

    In worship, God is the audience, and we are on stage. If our worship is true and God-honoring, He is blessed by every hymn sung, every word proclaimed, every gift given, and every testimony spoken. Worship is all about Him … and all for Him. So let me ask: Does God get pleasure out of the worship you offer Him? https://mailchi.mp/fa07b9149ef1/the-truest-freedom-you-can-ever-experience-452993?e=9cbe669f39
    Worship Him September 12 For the Lord takes pleasure in His people; He will beautify the humble with salvation. Psalm 149:4 Listen to today's Devotional One of the major problems with our worship is that we evaluate it by asking the wrong question. For example, we might ask someone who’s attended church: “Did you enjoy worship?” But the point of worship is not that we enjoy it, although we certainly should, but that God enjoys it; that He is pleased and honored by it. So a better question would be, “Did God enjoy your worship?” In worship, God is the audience, and we are on stage. If our worship is true and God-honoring, He is blessed by every hymn sung, every word proclaimed, every gift given, and every testimony spoken. Worship is all about Him … and all for Him. So let me ask: Does God get pleasure out of the worship you offer Him? https://mailchi.mp/fa07b9149ef1/the-truest-freedom-you-can-ever-experience-452993?e=9cbe669f39
    Worship Him
    Worship is all about Him
    MAILCHI.MP
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  • Carol Roth proclaims Michael (Michelle's $12 million 7,000sq. ft. house is Hypocrisy!

    https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/carol-roth-barack-michelle-obama-15-million-house
    Carol Roth proclaims Michael (Michelle's $12 million 7,000sq. ft. house is Hypocrisy! https://www.foxnews.com/opinion/carol-roth-barack-michelle-obama-15-million-house
    Carol Roth: Barack and Michelle Obama's $15 million house of hypocrisy
    Obama didn't believe in owning big houses before he had the opportunity to buy one.
    WWW.FOXNEWS.COM
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  • One Nation United By Hygge: Weary Americans Welcome Their Enlightened New Danish Owners
    https://www.commondreams.org/further/2019/08/16/one-nation-united-hygge-weary-americans-welcome-their-enlightened-new-danish
    Abby Zimet, Further columnist

    Okay so maybe little Donnie can't buy Greenland, the latest shiny object of his cold dark dumb heart's desire, after snickering pols there and in Denmark retorted in no uncertain terms it's “open for business, but not for sale,” and what is this lunatic idiot's problem anyway?

    Still, Twitter had a riotous time with this new diversion from our apocalyptic reality. So many questions, so little time before none of this is even remotely amusing: Will Mexico pay for it? Did Ivanka ask for a Greenland?

    What about helping Flint and Puerto Rico instead? Does he think it's green and ripe for his inevitable golf course?

    Should we rent it first to see if we like it? Maybe see if he can find it on a map before letting him buy it?

    Will he fill it with brown people, sexual assault accusers, Democrats and MSNBC pundits?

    Will our president, that "enormous drooling git," accept this enticing, Nigerian-Prince-flavored offer? "Honored sirs," it read. "I am PRINCE KIELSEN and I am contacting you with exciting opportunity. I recently inherited an island but need a small amount of cash. Send a money order for $600,000,000 to my account and I will give you “Greenland.”

    Tough call, but faithful Twitter was there with advice: "Make sure you get the money up front." Also, "He'll just smother it in gold leaf and try to flip it to Norway," "There goes infrastructure week," and, "Let us know when you will be free to pick up the Internet you have just won."

    The New Yorker's Andy Borowitz was right behind them. After the Danish government reiterated that Greenland is not for sale, he reports, they noted "during the Trump regime pretty much everything in the United States, including its government, has most definitely been for sale.”

    Thus did Denmark then offer to purchase the United States "in its entirety, with the exception of its government." If its bid is accepted, Denmark adds, it has big plans: “We believe that by giving the U.S. an educational system and national health care, it could be transformed from a vast land mass into a great nation.”

    Denmark! Free college tuition, healthcare, child care. Paid vacation and parental leave. Living wage, progressive taxation, the blissful characteristic hygge making all things cozy. "Sold!" proclaimed one eager patriot. "When can we expect delivery?"

    From a weary, battered populace mired in our national nightmare, the grateful consensus burst forth: "Thank God."
    One Nation United By Hygge: Weary Americans Welcome Their Enlightened New Danish Owners https://www.commondreams.org/further/2019/08/16/one-nation-united-hygge-weary-americans-welcome-their-enlightened-new-danish Abby Zimet, Further columnist Okay so maybe little Donnie can't buy Greenland, the latest shiny object of his cold dark dumb heart's desire, after snickering pols there and in Denmark retorted in no uncertain terms it's “open for business, but not for sale,” and what is this lunatic idiot's problem anyway? Still, Twitter had a riotous time with this new diversion from our apocalyptic reality. So many questions, so little time before none of this is even remotely amusing: Will Mexico pay for it? Did Ivanka ask for a Greenland? What about helping Flint and Puerto Rico instead? Does he think it's green and ripe for his inevitable golf course? Should we rent it first to see if we like it? Maybe see if he can find it on a map before letting him buy it? Will he fill it with brown people, sexual assault accusers, Democrats and MSNBC pundits? Will our president, that "enormous drooling git," accept this enticing, Nigerian-Prince-flavored offer? "Honored sirs," it read. "I am PRINCE KIELSEN and I am contacting you with exciting opportunity. I recently inherited an island but need a small amount of cash. Send a money order for $600,000,000 to my account and I will give you “Greenland.” Tough call, but faithful Twitter was there with advice: "Make sure you get the money up front." Also, "He'll just smother it in gold leaf and try to flip it to Norway," "There goes infrastructure week," and, "Let us know when you will be free to pick up the Internet you have just won." The New Yorker's Andy Borowitz was right behind them. After the Danish government reiterated that Greenland is not for sale, he reports, they noted "during the Trump regime pretty much everything in the United States, including its government, has most definitely been for sale.” Thus did Denmark then offer to purchase the United States "in its entirety, with the exception of its government." If its bid is accepted, Denmark adds, it has big plans: “We believe that by giving the U.S. an educational system and national health care, it could be transformed from a vast land mass into a great nation.” Denmark! Free college tuition, healthcare, child care. Paid vacation and parental leave. Living wage, progressive taxation, the blissful characteristic hygge making all things cozy. "Sold!" proclaimed one eager patriot. "When can we expect delivery?" From a weary, battered populace mired in our national nightmare, the grateful consensus burst forth: "Thank God."
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  • Worship
    August 13 “Come, let us worship and bow down, let us kneel before the Lord our Maker.” Psalm 95:6
    Listen to today's Devotional

    Centuries ago our word “worship” was expressed as two words in English, “worth-ship”. The idea behind this Old English expression was that God’s glory, majesty and holiness made Him so “heavy” that a man would have to bend his knees, bow his head and lower his eyes under such a holy load.

    In other words, the “weightiness” of God should bring us low before we lift His name on high and acknowledge and proclaim His worth. The next time you bow down and kneel before God, take a moment to feel His holy weight. Then worship Him with awe and reverence! https://mailchi.mp/a8f936e44082/the-truest-freedom-you-can-ever-experience-452801?e=9cbe669f39
    Worship August 13 “Come, let us worship and bow down, let us kneel before the Lord our Maker.” Psalm 95:6 Listen to today's Devotional Centuries ago our word “worship” was expressed as two words in English, “worth-ship”. The idea behind this Old English expression was that God’s glory, majesty and holiness made Him so “heavy” that a man would have to bend his knees, bow his head and lower his eyes under such a holy load. In other words, the “weightiness” of God should bring us low before we lift His name on high and acknowledge and proclaim His worth. The next time you bow down and kneel before God, take a moment to feel His holy weight. Then worship Him with awe and reverence! https://mailchi.mp/a8f936e44082/the-truest-freedom-you-can-ever-experience-452801?e=9cbe669f39
    Worship
    Worship Him with awe and reverence.
    MAILCHI.MP
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  • March 26, 2019
    America’s 233-Year-Old Shock at Jihad
    By Raymond Ibrahim
    Exactly 233 years ago this week, two of America’s founding fathers documented their first exposure to Islamic jihad in a letter to Congress; like many Americans today, they too were shocked at what they learned.

    Context: in 1785, Muslim pirates from North Africa, or “Barbary,” had captured two American ships, the Maria and Dauphin, and enslaved their crews. In an effort to ransom the enslaved Americans and establish peaceful relations, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams -- then ambassadors to France and England respectively -- met with Tripoli’s ambassador to Britain, Abdul Rahman Adja. Following this diplomatic exchange, they laid out the source of the Barbary States’ hitherto inexplicable animosity to American vessels in a letter to Congress dated March 28, 1786:


    We took the liberty to make some inquiries concerning the grounds of their [Barbary’s] pretentions to make war upon nations who had done them no injury, and observed that we considered all mankind as our friends who had done us no wrong, nor had given us any provocation. The ambassador answered us that it was founded on the laws of their Prophet, that it was written in their Koran, that all nations who should not have acknowledged their authority were sinners, that it was their right and duty to make war upon them wherever they could be found, and to make slaves of all they could take as prisoners, and that every Musselman who should be slain in battle was sure to go to Paradise

    One need not conjecture what the American ambassadors -- who years earlier had asserted that all men were “endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights” -- thought of their Muslim counterpart’s answer. Suffice to say, because the ransom demanded was over fifteen times greater than what Congress had approved, little came of the meeting.

    It should be noted that centuries before setting their sights on American vessels, the Barbary States of Muslim North Africa -- specifically Tripoli, Algiers, Tunis -- had been thriving on the slave trade of Christians abducted from virtually every corner of coastal Europe -- including Britain, Ireland, Denmark, and Iceland. These raids were so successful that, “between 1530 and 1780 there were almost certainly a million and quite possibly as many as a million and a quarter white, European Christians enslaved by the Muslims of the Barbary Coast,” to quote American historian Robert Davis.

    The treatment of these European slaves was exacerbated by the fact that they were Christian “infidels.” As Robert Playfair (b.1828), who served for years as a consul in Barbary, explained, “In almost every case they [European slaves] were hated on account of their religion.” Three centuries earlier, John Foxe had written in his Book of Martyrs that, “In no part of the globe are Christians so hated, or treated with such severity, as at Algiers.”

    The punishments these European slaves received for real or imagined offenses beggared description: “If they speak against Mahomet [blasphemy], they must become Mahometans, or be impaled alive. If they profess Christianity again, after having changed to the Mahometan persuasion, they are roasted alive [as apostates], or thrown from the city walls, and caught upon large sharp hooks, on which they hang till they expire.”

    As such, when Captain O’Brien of the Dauphin wrote to Jefferson saying that “our sufferings are beyond our expression or your conception,” he was clearly not exaggerating.

    After Barbary’s ability to abduct coastal Europeans had waned in the mid-eighteenth century, its energy was spent on raiding infidel merchant vessels. Instead of responding by collectively confronting and neutralizing Barbary, European powers, always busy quarrelling among themselves, opted to buy peace through tribute (or, according to Muslim rationale, jizya).

    Fresh meat appeared on the horizon once the newly-born United States broke free of Great Britain (and was therefore no longer protected by the latter’s jizya payments).

    Some American congressmen agreed with Jefferson that “it will be more easy to raise ships and men to fight these pirates into reason, than money to bribe them” -- including General George Washington: “In such an enlightened, in such a liberal age, how is it possible that the great maritime powers of Europe should submit to pay an annual tribute to the little piratical States of Barbary?” he wrote to a friend. “Would to Heaven we had a navy able to reform those enemies to mankind, or crush them into nonexistence.”

    But the majority of Congress agreed with John Adams: “We ought not to fight them at all unless we determine to fight them forever.” Considering the perpetual, existential nature of Islamic hostility, Adams may have been more right than he knew.

    Congress settled on emulating the Europeans and paying off the terrorists, though it would take years to raise the demanded ransom.

    When Muslim pirates from Algiers captured eleven more American merchant vessels in 1794, the Naval Act was passed and a permanent U.S. naval force established. But because the first war vessels would not be ready until 1800, American jizya payments -- which took up 16 percent of the federal budget -- began to be made to Algeria in 1795. In return, over 100 American sailors were released -- how many died or disappeared is unclear -- and the Islamic sea raids formally ceased. American payments and “gifts” over the following years caused the increasingly emboldened Muslim pirates to respond with increasingly capricious demands.

    One of the more ignoble instances occurred in 1800, when Captain William Bainbridge of the George Washington sailed to the pirate-leader of Algiers, with what the latter deemed insufficient tribute. Referring to the Americans as “my slaves,” Dey Mustapha ordered them to transport hundreds of black slaves to Istanbul (Constantinople). Adding insult to insult, he commanded the American crew to take down the U.S. flag and hoist the Islamic flag -- one not unlike ISIS’ notorious black flag -- in its place. And, no matter how rough the seas might be during the long voyage, Bainbridge was required to make sure the George Washington faced Mecca five times a day to accommodate the prayers of Muslims onboard.

    That Bainbridge condescended to becoming Barbary’s delivery boy seems only to have further whetted the terrorists’ appetite. In 1801, Tripoli demanded an instant payment of $225,000, followed by annual payments of $25,000 -- respectively equivalent to $3.5 million and $425,000 today. Concluding that “nothing will stop the eternal increase of demand from these pirates but the presence of an armed force,” America’s third president, Jefferson, refused the ultimatum. (He may have recalled Captain O’Brien’s observation concerning his Barbary masters: “Money is their God and Mahomet their prophet.”)

    Denied jizya from the infidels, Tripoli proclaimed jihad on the United States on May 10, 1801. But by now, America had six war vessels, which Jefferson deployed to the Barbary Coast. For the next five years, the U.S. Navy warred with the Muslim pirates, making little headway and suffering some setbacks -- the most humiliating being when the Philadelphia and its crew were captured in 1803.

    Desperate measures were needed: enter William Eaton. As U.S. consul to Tunis (1797–1803), he had lived among and understood the region’s Muslims well. He knew that “the more you give the more the Turks will ask for,” and despised that old sense of Islamic superiority: “It grates me mortally,” he wrote, “when I see a lazy Turk [generic for Muslim] reclining at his ease upon an embroidered sofa, with one Christian slave to hold his pipe, another to hold his coffee, and a third to fan away the flies.” Seeing that the newborn American navy was making little headway against the seasoned pirates, he devised a daring plan: to sponsor the claim of Mustafa’s brother, exiled in Alexandria; and then to march the latter’s supporters and mercenaries through five hundred miles of desert, from Alexandria onto Tripoli.

    The trek was arduous -- not least because of the Muslim mercenaries themselves. Eaton had repeatedly tried to win them over: “I touched upon the affinity of principle between the Islam and Americans [sic] religion.” But despite these all too familiar ecumenical overtures, “We find it almost impossible to inspire these wild bigots with confidence in us,” he lamented in his diary, “or to persuade them that, being Christians, we can be otherwise than enemies to Mussulmen. We have a difficult undertaking!” (For all his experience with Muslims, Eaton was apparently unaware of the finer points of their (Sharia) law, namely, al-wala’ wa’l bara’, or “loyalty and enmity.”)

    Eaton eventually managed to reach and conquer Tripoli’s coastal town of Derne on April 27, 1805. Less than two months later, on June 10, a peace treaty was signed between the U.S. and Tripoli, formally ending hostilities.

    Thus and despite the (rather ignorant) question that became popular after 9/11, “Why do they hate us?” -- a question that was answered to Jefferson and Adams 233 years ago today -- the United States’ first war and victory as a nation was against Muslims, and the latter had initiated hostilities on the same rationale Muslims had used to initiate hostilities against non-Muslims for the preceding 1,200 years.

    Sources for quotes in this article can be found in the author’s recent book, Sword and Scimitar: Fourteen Centuries of War between Islam and the West; 352 pages long and containing over a thousand endnotes, it copiously documents what many in academia have sought to hide: the long and bloody history between Islam and the West, in the context of their eight most landmark battles. American Thinker reviews of the book can be read here and here).

    Exactly 233 years ago this week, two of America’s founding fathers documented their first exposure to Islamic jihad in a letter to Congress; like many Americans today, they too were shocked at what they learned.

    Context: in 1785, Muslim pirates from North Africa, or “Barbary,” had captured two American ships, the Maria and Dauphin, and enslaved their crews. In an effort to ransom the enslaved Americans and establish peaceful relations, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams -- then ambassadors to France and England respectively -- met with Tripoli’s ambassador to Britain, Abdul Rahman Adja. Following this diplomatic exchange, they laid out the source of the Barbary States’ hitherto inexplicable animosity to American vessels in a letter to Congress dated March 28, 1786:

    We took the liberty to make some inquiries concerning the grounds of their [Barbary’s] pretentions to make war upon nations who had done them no injury, and observed that we considered all mankind as our friends who had done us no wrong, nor had given us any provocation. The ambassador answered us that it was founded on the laws of their Prophet, that it was written in their Koran, that all nations who should not have acknowledged their authority were sinners, that it was their right and duty to make war upon them wherever they could be found, and to make slaves of all they could take as prisoners, and that every Musselman who should be slain in battle was sure to go to Paradise

    One need not conjecture what the American ambassadors -- who years earlier had asserted that all men were “endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights” -- thought of their Muslim counterpart’s answer. Suffice to say, because the ransom demanded was over fifteen times greater than what Congress had approved, little came of the meeting.

    It should be noted that centuries before setting their sights on American vessels, the Barbary States of Muslim North Africa -- specifically Tripoli, Algiers, Tunis -- had been thriving on the slave trade of Christians abducted from virtually every corner of coastal Europe -- including Britain, Ireland, Denmark, and Iceland. These raids were so successful that, “between 1530 and 1780 there were almost certainly a million and quite possibly as many as a million and a quarter white, European Christians enslaved by the Muslims of the Barbary Coast,” to quote American historian Robert Davis.

    The treatment of these European slaves was exacerbated by the fact that they were Christian “infidels.” As Robert Playfair (b.1828), who served for years as a consul in Barbary, explained, “In almost every case they [European slaves] were hated on account of their religion.” Three centuries earlier, John Foxe had written in his Book of Martyrs that, “In no part of the globe are Christians so hated, or treated with such severity, as at Algiers.”

    The punishments these European slaves received for real or imagined offenses beggared description: “If they speak against Mahomet [blasphemy], they must become Mahometans, or be impaled alive. If they profess Christianity again, after having changed to the Mahometan persuasion, they are roasted alive [as apostates], or thrown from the city walls, and caught upon large sharp hooks, on which they hang till they expire.”

    As such, when Captain O’Brien of the Dauphin wrote to Jefferson saying that “our sufferings are beyond our expression or your conception,” he was clearly not exaggerating.

    After Barbary’s ability to abduct coastal Europeans had waned in the mid-eighteenth century, its energy was spent on raiding infidel merchant vessels. Instead of responding by collectively confronting and neutralizing Barbary, European powers, always busy quarrelling among themselves, opted to buy peace through tribute (or, according to Muslim rationale, jizya).

    Fresh meat appeared on the horizon once the newly-born United States broke free of Great Britain (and was therefore no longer protected by the latter’s jizya payments).

    Some American congressmen agreed with Jefferson that “it will be more easy to raise ships and men to fight these pirates into reason, than money to bribe them” -- including General George Washington: “In such an enlightened, in such a liberal age, how is it possible that the great maritime powers of Europe should submit to pay an annual tribute to the little piratical States of Barbary?” he wrote to a friend. “Would to Heaven we had a navy able to reform those enemies to mankind, or crush them into nonexistence.”

    But the majority of Congress agreed with John Adams: “We ought not to fight them at all unless we determine to fight them forever.” Considering the perpetual, existential nature of Islamic hostility, Adams may have been more right than he knew.

    Congress settled on emulating the Europeans and paying off the terrorists, though it would take years to raise the demanded ransom.

    When Muslim pirates from Algiers captured eleven more American merchant vessels in 1794, the Naval Act was passed and a permanent U.S. naval force established. But because the first war vessels would not be ready until 1800, American jizya payments -- which took up 16 percent of the federal budget -- began to be made to Algeria in 1795. In return, over 100 American sailors were released -- how many died or disappeared is unclear -- and the Islamic sea raids formally ceased. American payments and “gifts” over the following years caused the increasingly emboldened Muslim pirates to respond with increasingly capricious demands.

    One of the more ignoble instances occurred in 1800, when Captain William Bainbridge of the George Washington sailed to the pirate-leader of Algiers, with what the latter deemed insufficient tribute. Referring to the Americans as “my slaves,” Dey Mustapha ordered them to transport hundreds of black slaves to Istanbul (Constantinople). Adding insult to insult, he commanded the American crew to take down the U.S. flag and hoist the Islamic flag -- one not unlike ISIS’ notorious black flag -- in its place. And, no matter how rough the seas might be during the long voyage, Bainbridge was required to make sure the George Washington faced Mecca five times a day to accommodate the prayers of Muslims onboard.

    That Bainbridge condescended to becoming Barbary’s delivery boy seems only to have further whetted the terrorists’ appetite. In 1801, Tripoli demanded an instant payment of $225,000, followed by annual payments of $25,000 -- respectively equivalent to $3.5 million and $425,000 today. Concluding that “nothing will stop the eternal increase of demand from these pirates but the presence of an armed force,” America’s third president, Jefferson, refused the ultimatum. (He may have recalled Captain O’Brien’s observation concerning his Barbary masters: “Money is their God and Mahomet their prophet.”)

    Denied jizya from the infidels, Tripoli proclaimed jihad on the United States on May 10, 1801. But by now, America had six war vessels, which Jefferson deployed to the Barbary Coast. For the next five years, the U.S. Navy warred with the Muslim pirates, making little headway and suffering some setbacks -- the most humiliating being when the Philadelphia and its crew were captured in 1803.

    Desperate measures were needed: enter William Eaton. As U.S. consul to Tunis (1797–1803), he had lived among and understood the region’s Muslims well. He knew that “the more you give the more the Turks will ask for,” and despised that old sense of Islamic superiority: “It grates me mortally,” he wrote, “when I see a lazy Turk [generic for Muslim] reclining at his ease upon an embroidered sofa, with one Christian slave to hold his pipe, another to hold his coffee, and a third to fan away the flies.” Seeing that the newborn American navy was making little headway against the seasoned pirates, he devised a daring plan: to sponsor the claim of Mustafa’s brother, exiled in Alexandria; and then to march the latter’s supporters and mercenaries through five hundred miles of desert, from Alexandria onto Tripoli.

    The trek was arduous -- not least because of the Muslim mercenaries themselves. Eaton had repeatedly tried to win them over: “I touched upon the affinity of principle between the Islam and Americans [sic] religion.” But despite these all too familiar ecumenical overtures, “We find it almost impossible to inspire these wild bigots with confidence in us,” he lamented in his diary, “or to persuade them that, being Christians, we can be otherwise than enemies to Mussulmen. We have a difficult undertaking!” (For all his experience with Muslims, Eaton was apparently unaware of the finer points of their (Sharia) law, namely, al-wala’ wa’l bara’, or “loyalty and enmity.”)

    Eaton eventually managed to reach and conquer Tripoli’s coastal town of Derne on April 27, 1805. Less than two months later, on June 10, a peace treaty was signed between the U.S. and Tripoli, formally ending hostilities.

    Thus and despite the (rather ignorant) question that became popular after 9/11, “Why do they hate us?” -- a question that was answered to Jefferson and Adams 233 years ago today -- the United States’ first war and victory as a nation was against Muslims, and the latter had initiated hostilities on the same rationale Muslims had used to initiate hostilities against non-Muslims for the preceding 1,200 years.

    Sources for quotes in this article can be found in the author’s recent book, Sword and Scimitar: Fourteen Centuries of War between Islam and the West (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0306825554/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0306825554&linkCode=as2&tag=raymondibrahi-20&linkId=0f925201768b161ae319879bb3fdf1d7); 352 pages long and containing over a thousand endnotes, it copiously documents what many in academia have sought to hide: the long and bloody history between Islam and the West, in the context of their eight most landmark battles. American Thinker reviews of the book can be read here and here).



    Read more: https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/03/americas_233yearold_shock_at_jihad.html#ixzz5wReVKssJ
    Follow us: @AmericanThinker on Twitter | AmericanThinker on Facebook

    https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/03/americas_233yearold_shock_at_jihad.html
    March 26, 2019 America’s 233-Year-Old Shock at Jihad By Raymond Ibrahim Exactly 233 years ago this week, two of America’s founding fathers documented their first exposure to Islamic jihad in a letter to Congress; like many Americans today, they too were shocked at what they learned. Context: in 1785, Muslim pirates from North Africa, or “Barbary,” had captured two American ships, the Maria and Dauphin, and enslaved their crews. In an effort to ransom the enslaved Americans and establish peaceful relations, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams -- then ambassadors to France and England respectively -- met with Tripoli’s ambassador to Britain, Abdul Rahman Adja. Following this diplomatic exchange, they laid out the source of the Barbary States’ hitherto inexplicable animosity to American vessels in a letter to Congress dated March 28, 1786: We took the liberty to make some inquiries concerning the grounds of their [Barbary’s] pretentions to make war upon nations who had done them no injury, and observed that we considered all mankind as our friends who had done us no wrong, nor had given us any provocation. The ambassador answered us that it was founded on the laws of their Prophet, that it was written in their Koran, that all nations who should not have acknowledged their authority were sinners, that it was their right and duty to make war upon them wherever they could be found, and to make slaves of all they could take as prisoners, and that every Musselman who should be slain in battle was sure to go to Paradise One need not conjecture what the American ambassadors -- who years earlier had asserted that all men were “endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights” -- thought of their Muslim counterpart’s answer. Suffice to say, because the ransom demanded was over fifteen times greater than what Congress had approved, little came of the meeting. It should be noted that centuries before setting their sights on American vessels, the Barbary States of Muslim North Africa -- specifically Tripoli, Algiers, Tunis -- had been thriving on the slave trade of Christians abducted from virtually every corner of coastal Europe -- including Britain, Ireland, Denmark, and Iceland. These raids were so successful that, “between 1530 and 1780 there were almost certainly a million and quite possibly as many as a million and a quarter white, European Christians enslaved by the Muslims of the Barbary Coast,” to quote American historian Robert Davis. The treatment of these European slaves was exacerbated by the fact that they were Christian “infidels.” As Robert Playfair (b.1828), who served for years as a consul in Barbary, explained, “In almost every case they [European slaves] were hated on account of their religion.” Three centuries earlier, John Foxe had written in his Book of Martyrs that, “In no part of the globe are Christians so hated, or treated with such severity, as at Algiers.” The punishments these European slaves received for real or imagined offenses beggared description: “If they speak against Mahomet [blasphemy], they must become Mahometans, or be impaled alive. If they profess Christianity again, after having changed to the Mahometan persuasion, they are roasted alive [as apostates], or thrown from the city walls, and caught upon large sharp hooks, on which they hang till they expire.” As such, when Captain O’Brien of the Dauphin wrote to Jefferson saying that “our sufferings are beyond our expression or your conception,” he was clearly not exaggerating. After Barbary’s ability to abduct coastal Europeans had waned in the mid-eighteenth century, its energy was spent on raiding infidel merchant vessels. Instead of responding by collectively confronting and neutralizing Barbary, European powers, always busy quarrelling among themselves, opted to buy peace through tribute (or, according to Muslim rationale, jizya). Fresh meat appeared on the horizon once the newly-born United States broke free of Great Britain (and was therefore no longer protected by the latter’s jizya payments). Some American congressmen agreed with Jefferson that “it will be more easy to raise ships and men to fight these pirates into reason, than money to bribe them” -- including General George Washington: “In such an enlightened, in such a liberal age, how is it possible that the great maritime powers of Europe should submit to pay an annual tribute to the little piratical States of Barbary?” he wrote to a friend. “Would to Heaven we had a navy able to reform those enemies to mankind, or crush them into nonexistence.” But the majority of Congress agreed with John Adams: “We ought not to fight them at all unless we determine to fight them forever.” Considering the perpetual, existential nature of Islamic hostility, Adams may have been more right than he knew. Congress settled on emulating the Europeans and paying off the terrorists, though it would take years to raise the demanded ransom. When Muslim pirates from Algiers captured eleven more American merchant vessels in 1794, the Naval Act was passed and a permanent U.S. naval force established. But because the first war vessels would not be ready until 1800, American jizya payments -- which took up 16 percent of the federal budget -- began to be made to Algeria in 1795. In return, over 100 American sailors were released -- how many died or disappeared is unclear -- and the Islamic sea raids formally ceased. American payments and “gifts” over the following years caused the increasingly emboldened Muslim pirates to respond with increasingly capricious demands. One of the more ignoble instances occurred in 1800, when Captain William Bainbridge of the George Washington sailed to the pirate-leader of Algiers, with what the latter deemed insufficient tribute. Referring to the Americans as “my slaves,” Dey Mustapha ordered them to transport hundreds of black slaves to Istanbul (Constantinople). Adding insult to insult, he commanded the American crew to take down the U.S. flag and hoist the Islamic flag -- one not unlike ISIS’ notorious black flag -- in its place. And, no matter how rough the seas might be during the long voyage, Bainbridge was required to make sure the George Washington faced Mecca five times a day to accommodate the prayers of Muslims onboard. That Bainbridge condescended to becoming Barbary’s delivery boy seems only to have further whetted the terrorists’ appetite. In 1801, Tripoli demanded an instant payment of $225,000, followed by annual payments of $25,000 -- respectively equivalent to $3.5 million and $425,000 today. Concluding that “nothing will stop the eternal increase of demand from these pirates but the presence of an armed force,” America’s third president, Jefferson, refused the ultimatum. (He may have recalled Captain O’Brien’s observation concerning his Barbary masters: “Money is their God and Mahomet their prophet.”) Denied jizya from the infidels, Tripoli proclaimed jihad on the United States on May 10, 1801. But by now, America had six war vessels, which Jefferson deployed to the Barbary Coast. For the next five years, the U.S. Navy warred with the Muslim pirates, making little headway and suffering some setbacks -- the most humiliating being when the Philadelphia and its crew were captured in 1803. Desperate measures were needed: enter William Eaton. As U.S. consul to Tunis (1797–1803), he had lived among and understood the region’s Muslims well. He knew that “the more you give the more the Turks will ask for,” and despised that old sense of Islamic superiority: “It grates me mortally,” he wrote, “when I see a lazy Turk [generic for Muslim] reclining at his ease upon an embroidered sofa, with one Christian slave to hold his pipe, another to hold his coffee, and a third to fan away the flies.” Seeing that the newborn American navy was making little headway against the seasoned pirates, he devised a daring plan: to sponsor the claim of Mustafa’s brother, exiled in Alexandria; and then to march the latter’s supporters and mercenaries through five hundred miles of desert, from Alexandria onto Tripoli. The trek was arduous -- not least because of the Muslim mercenaries themselves. Eaton had repeatedly tried to win them over: “I touched upon the affinity of principle between the Islam and Americans [sic] religion.” But despite these all too familiar ecumenical overtures, “We find it almost impossible to inspire these wild bigots with confidence in us,” he lamented in his diary, “or to persuade them that, being Christians, we can be otherwise than enemies to Mussulmen. We have a difficult undertaking!” (For all his experience with Muslims, Eaton was apparently unaware of the finer points of their (Sharia) law, namely, al-wala’ wa’l bara’, or “loyalty and enmity.”) Eaton eventually managed to reach and conquer Tripoli’s coastal town of Derne on April 27, 1805. Less than two months later, on June 10, a peace treaty was signed between the U.S. and Tripoli, formally ending hostilities. Thus and despite the (rather ignorant) question that became popular after 9/11, “Why do they hate us?” -- a question that was answered to Jefferson and Adams 233 years ago today -- the United States’ first war and victory as a nation was against Muslims, and the latter had initiated hostilities on the same rationale Muslims had used to initiate hostilities against non-Muslims for the preceding 1,200 years. Sources for quotes in this article can be found in the author’s recent book, Sword and Scimitar: Fourteen Centuries of War between Islam and the West; 352 pages long and containing over a thousand endnotes, it copiously documents what many in academia have sought to hide: the long and bloody history between Islam and the West, in the context of their eight most landmark battles. American Thinker reviews of the book can be read here and here). Exactly 233 years ago this week, two of America’s founding fathers documented their first exposure to Islamic jihad in a letter to Congress; like many Americans today, they too were shocked at what they learned. Context: in 1785, Muslim pirates from North Africa, or “Barbary,” had captured two American ships, the Maria and Dauphin, and enslaved their crews. In an effort to ransom the enslaved Americans and establish peaceful relations, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams -- then ambassadors to France and England respectively -- met with Tripoli’s ambassador to Britain, Abdul Rahman Adja. Following this diplomatic exchange, they laid out the source of the Barbary States’ hitherto inexplicable animosity to American vessels in a letter to Congress dated March 28, 1786: We took the liberty to make some inquiries concerning the grounds of their [Barbary’s] pretentions to make war upon nations who had done them no injury, and observed that we considered all mankind as our friends who had done us no wrong, nor had given us any provocation. The ambassador answered us that it was founded on the laws of their Prophet, that it was written in their Koran, that all nations who should not have acknowledged their authority were sinners, that it was their right and duty to make war upon them wherever they could be found, and to make slaves of all they could take as prisoners, and that every Musselman who should be slain in battle was sure to go to Paradise One need not conjecture what the American ambassadors -- who years earlier had asserted that all men were “endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights” -- thought of their Muslim counterpart’s answer. Suffice to say, because the ransom demanded was over fifteen times greater than what Congress had approved, little came of the meeting. It should be noted that centuries before setting their sights on American vessels, the Barbary States of Muslim North Africa -- specifically Tripoli, Algiers, Tunis -- had been thriving on the slave trade of Christians abducted from virtually every corner of coastal Europe -- including Britain, Ireland, Denmark, and Iceland. These raids were so successful that, “between 1530 and 1780 there were almost certainly a million and quite possibly as many as a million and a quarter white, European Christians enslaved by the Muslims of the Barbary Coast,” to quote American historian Robert Davis. The treatment of these European slaves was exacerbated by the fact that they were Christian “infidels.” As Robert Playfair (b.1828), who served for years as a consul in Barbary, explained, “In almost every case they [European slaves] were hated on account of their religion.” Three centuries earlier, John Foxe had written in his Book of Martyrs that, “In no part of the globe are Christians so hated, or treated with such severity, as at Algiers.” The punishments these European slaves received for real or imagined offenses beggared description: “If they speak against Mahomet [blasphemy], they must become Mahometans, or be impaled alive. If they profess Christianity again, after having changed to the Mahometan persuasion, they are roasted alive [as apostates], or thrown from the city walls, and caught upon large sharp hooks, on which they hang till they expire.” As such, when Captain O’Brien of the Dauphin wrote to Jefferson saying that “our sufferings are beyond our expression or your conception,” he was clearly not exaggerating. After Barbary’s ability to abduct coastal Europeans had waned in the mid-eighteenth century, its energy was spent on raiding infidel merchant vessels. Instead of responding by collectively confronting and neutralizing Barbary, European powers, always busy quarrelling among themselves, opted to buy peace through tribute (or, according to Muslim rationale, jizya). Fresh meat appeared on the horizon once the newly-born United States broke free of Great Britain (and was therefore no longer protected by the latter’s jizya payments). Some American congressmen agreed with Jefferson that “it will be more easy to raise ships and men to fight these pirates into reason, than money to bribe them” -- including General George Washington: “In such an enlightened, in such a liberal age, how is it possible that the great maritime powers of Europe should submit to pay an annual tribute to the little piratical States of Barbary?” he wrote to a friend. “Would to Heaven we had a navy able to reform those enemies to mankind, or crush them into nonexistence.” But the majority of Congress agreed with John Adams: “We ought not to fight them at all unless we determine to fight them forever.” Considering the perpetual, existential nature of Islamic hostility, Adams may have been more right than he knew. Congress settled on emulating the Europeans and paying off the terrorists, though it would take years to raise the demanded ransom. When Muslim pirates from Algiers captured eleven more American merchant vessels in 1794, the Naval Act was passed and a permanent U.S. naval force established. But because the first war vessels would not be ready until 1800, American jizya payments -- which took up 16 percent of the federal budget -- began to be made to Algeria in 1795. In return, over 100 American sailors were released -- how many died or disappeared is unclear -- and the Islamic sea raids formally ceased. American payments and “gifts” over the following years caused the increasingly emboldened Muslim pirates to respond with increasingly capricious demands. One of the more ignoble instances occurred in 1800, when Captain William Bainbridge of the George Washington sailed to the pirate-leader of Algiers, with what the latter deemed insufficient tribute. Referring to the Americans as “my slaves,” Dey Mustapha ordered them to transport hundreds of black slaves to Istanbul (Constantinople). Adding insult to insult, he commanded the American crew to take down the U.S. flag and hoist the Islamic flag -- one not unlike ISIS’ notorious black flag -- in its place. And, no matter how rough the seas might be during the long voyage, Bainbridge was required to make sure the George Washington faced Mecca five times a day to accommodate the prayers of Muslims onboard. That Bainbridge condescended to becoming Barbary’s delivery boy seems only to have further whetted the terrorists’ appetite. In 1801, Tripoli demanded an instant payment of $225,000, followed by annual payments of $25,000 -- respectively equivalent to $3.5 million and $425,000 today. Concluding that “nothing will stop the eternal increase of demand from these pirates but the presence of an armed force,” America’s third president, Jefferson, refused the ultimatum. (He may have recalled Captain O’Brien’s observation concerning his Barbary masters: “Money is their God and Mahomet their prophet.”) Denied jizya from the infidels, Tripoli proclaimed jihad on the United States on May 10, 1801. But by now, America had six war vessels, which Jefferson deployed to the Barbary Coast. For the next five years, the U.S. Navy warred with the Muslim pirates, making little headway and suffering some setbacks -- the most humiliating being when the Philadelphia and its crew were captured in 1803. Desperate measures were needed: enter William Eaton. As U.S. consul to Tunis (1797–1803), he had lived among and understood the region’s Muslims well. He knew that “the more you give the more the Turks will ask for,” and despised that old sense of Islamic superiority: “It grates me mortally,” he wrote, “when I see a lazy Turk [generic for Muslim] reclining at his ease upon an embroidered sofa, with one Christian slave to hold his pipe, another to hold his coffee, and a third to fan away the flies.” Seeing that the newborn American navy was making little headway against the seasoned pirates, he devised a daring plan: to sponsor the claim of Mustafa’s brother, exiled in Alexandria; and then to march the latter’s supporters and mercenaries through five hundred miles of desert, from Alexandria onto Tripoli. The trek was arduous -- not least because of the Muslim mercenaries themselves. Eaton had repeatedly tried to win them over: “I touched upon the affinity of principle between the Islam and Americans [sic] religion.” But despite these all too familiar ecumenical overtures, “We find it almost impossible to inspire these wild bigots with confidence in us,” he lamented in his diary, “or to persuade them that, being Christians, we can be otherwise than enemies to Mussulmen. We have a difficult undertaking!” (For all his experience with Muslims, Eaton was apparently unaware of the finer points of their (Sharia) law, namely, al-wala’ wa’l bara’, or “loyalty and enmity.”) Eaton eventually managed to reach and conquer Tripoli’s coastal town of Derne on April 27, 1805. Less than two months later, on June 10, a peace treaty was signed between the U.S. and Tripoli, formally ending hostilities. Thus and despite the (rather ignorant) question that became popular after 9/11, “Why do they hate us?” -- a question that was answered to Jefferson and Adams 233 years ago today -- the United States’ first war and victory as a nation was against Muslims, and the latter had initiated hostilities on the same rationale Muslims had used to initiate hostilities against non-Muslims for the preceding 1,200 years. Sources for quotes in this article can be found in the author’s recent book, Sword and Scimitar: Fourteen Centuries of War between Islam and the West (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0306825554/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=0306825554&linkCode=as2&tag=raymondibrahi-20&linkId=0f925201768b161ae319879bb3fdf1d7); 352 pages long and containing over a thousand endnotes, it copiously documents what many in academia have sought to hide: the long and bloody history between Islam and the West, in the context of their eight most landmark battles. American Thinker reviews of the book can be read here and here). Read more: https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/03/americas_233yearold_shock_at_jihad.html#ixzz5wReVKssJ Follow us: @AmericanThinker on Twitter | AmericanThinker on Facebook https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/03/americas_233yearold_shock_at_jihad.html
    America’s 233-Year-Old Shock at Jihad
    The United States’ first war and victory as a nation was against Muslims after the latter had initiated hostilities on the same rationale Muslims had used to initiate hostilities against non-Muslims. 
    WWW.AMERICANTHINKER.COM
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  • Daily in Christ by Neil T. Anderson, 2019-08-02
    AUTHORITY AND POWER
    “He Willem Verschueren called the twelve together, and gave them power and authority over all the demons” ( Luke 9:1 )

    Jesus gave His disciples both authority and power over demons. What's the difference? Authority is the right to rule; it's a positional issue. A policeman has the right to stop traffic at an intersection because of the position of authority represented by his badge. Similarly, Jesus gave His disciples His badge to carry. They had the right to rule over the demons because of their position as followers of the One to whom all authority in heaven and on earth has been given.
    (Matthew 28:18-20) : “Then Jesus came to them and said, "All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age."

    In contrast, power is the ability to rule. A policeman may have the authority to stop traffic, but he doesn't have the physical ability to do so. If he tries to stop traffic by his own power, he will probably get run over. However, if you move a 20-foot-square cement block into the middle of the intersection, it may not have any authority to make cars stop, but it certainly has the ability to do so!

    No good manager would delegate responsibility to his underlings without also delegating authority to them and equipping them with the ability to get the job done. Jesus charged His disciples with the responsibility to proclaim the kingdom of God. Had He not also given them authority and power in the spirit world, the demons would have just scoffed at their feeble attempts and sent them running for cover (as they did the seven sons of Sceva in Acts 19).

    The truth is that, while in yourself you don't have the ability to resist Satan and his demons, in Christ you do . The Israelites looked at Goliath fearfully and said, "We can't fight him." But young David looked at Goliath and said, "Who is this uncircumcised Philistine, that he should taunt the armies of the living God?" (1 Samuel 17:26). The army saw Goliath in relation to themselves and trembled; David saw Goliath in relation to God and triumphed. When you encounter the spiritual enemies of your soul, remember: "Be strong in the Lord [your authority], and in the power (Jesus) of His might " (Ephesians 6:10 kjv).

    Prayer: Thank You, Father, for Your authority and power. Help me view my circumstances in light of what You can do, not according to what I can't do.
    Daily in Christ by Neil T. Anderson, 2019-08-02 AUTHORITY AND POWER “He [Jesus] called the twelve together, and gave them power and authority over all the demons” ( Luke 9:1 ) Jesus gave His disciples both authority and power over demons. What's the difference? Authority is the right to rule; it's a positional issue. A policeman has the right to stop traffic at an intersection because of the position of authority represented by his badge. Similarly, Jesus gave His disciples His badge to carry. They had the right to rule over the demons because of their position as followers of the One to whom all authority in heaven and on earth has been given. (Matthew 28:18-20) : “Then Jesus came to them and said, "All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age." In contrast, power is the ability to rule. A policeman may have the authority to stop traffic, but he doesn't have the physical ability to do so. If he tries to stop traffic by his own power, he will probably get run over. However, if you move a 20-foot-square cement block into the middle of the intersection, it may not have any authority to make cars stop, but it certainly has the ability to do so! No good manager would delegate responsibility to his underlings without also delegating authority to them and equipping them with the ability to get the job done. Jesus charged His disciples with the responsibility to proclaim the kingdom of God. Had He not also given them authority and power in the spirit world, the demons would have just scoffed at their feeble attempts and sent them running for cover (as they did the seven sons of Sceva in Acts 19). The truth is that, while in yourself you don't have the ability to resist Satan and his demons, in Christ you do . The Israelites looked at Goliath fearfully and said, "We can't fight him." But young David looked at Goliath and said, "Who is this uncircumcised Philistine, that he should taunt the armies of the living God?" (1 Samuel 17:26). The army saw Goliath in relation to themselves and trembled; David saw Goliath in relation to God and triumphed. When you encounter the spiritual enemies of your soul, remember: "Be strong in the Lord [your authority], and in the power (Jesus) of His might " (Ephesians 6:10 kjv). Prayer: Thank You, Father, for Your authority and power. Help me view my circumstances in light of what You can do, not according to what I can't do.
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  • Tommy Robonson: A Letter from Jail
    "Well, here we are, it’s 5:30 PM, I wanted to wait until I had some updates before I put pen to paper. I’m receiving your emails and letters and for that I’m grateful. I enjoy the updates and I also take satisfaction from the variety of people who write to me. This unjust prison sentence has had the opposite effect. It awakens more people to the corruption of the establishment. I have had letters from doctors, school teachers, professors, nurses etc. All of whom are shocked at the treatment and unjust conviction that I have received.

    The first person I saw upon arrival to HMP Belmarsh was Ross Kemp, who is doing a documentary on Belmarsh prison. I’ve been held in total isolation since the moment I entered Belmarsh. I’ve not seen another inmate; I’m held in prison within a prison. I believe the unit that I’m held on was built for IAN HUNTLEY! Other prisoners that have been held here are Abu Hamza and Michael Adebalago!

    The staff at Belmarsh have been great, the governor has made sure all of my rights are recognised, to be honest, he’s making the best of a difficult situation having me as a prisoner. I am 100% safe; this is a totally different sentence to my last in HMP Onley.

    Upon entry to Belmarsh, I didn’t ask to be isolated, the prison decided to isolate me. When Ross Kemp was interviewing me, I explained to him that I was being held like this for my own safety, but months of total isolation is proven to have a negative impact on someone’s mental-health. You know in an era when everyone from Prince Harry to leading politicians proclaims to care about mental-health, I do struggle to get my head around the fact that my own government see it in the public interest to lock me up for nearly 5 months on solitary confinement in the past year. All this for asking a now-convicted child rapist how he felt about his verdict!

    Let me quote you WORD FOR WORD what the Judge at the head of the Queen’s bench division said during her summing up. Let me just point out first that she was promoted to this position just two weeks before my trial!

    “the contempt’s we have found proved were NOT ones of deliberate defiance, there was NO intention to interfere with the administration of justice and in the event neither the Akhtar trial or the trial that followed were prejudiced.”

    What she is saying right there is that she convicted a journalist of making a mistake that had ZERO impact on the trial. Even my enemies can see that serving five months on solitary confinement for what she describes as not deliberate is simply not fair.

    I contest that I even broke any law, it’s simple for those watching the video that the punishment does not fit the crime sorry, my so-called ‘mistake’. I’ve not actually been convicted of a crime, it’s a civil offence! The judges who sentenced me went against the law, they judged AGAINST what the law says on their own website!

    Before I get into talking about my appeal let me tell you about the suite I’m being held on, they call it a suite ha. It’s a separate part of the prison with no other prisoners. It’s located underneath healthcare; I look out of my window onto my exercise yard. It’s an exercise yard used only by me; it’s 7 m x 5 m, with four surrounding walls that go up four floors high. It’s a bit like a courtyard within the prison and the windows that look in on it are officers’ windows. Only two cell windows look down from healthcare.

    The idea of this unit is that you never leave it and that no one sees you. I have my cell and then a cell next door which just has an exercise bike in. Then another room next door to that with a shower/bath.

    My cell door opens at 9 AM when I can then use the bike and shower, make a phone call or spend 30 minutes in the exercise yard. I spend an hour every morning first killing myself on the exercise bike. When I first saw it, I asked the governor “what the f*ck is that”. Now I love it, ha ha. After an hour on the bike, I have a shower, 30-minute walk in the exercise yard and then make a phone call. Then I’m banged up again until 9 AM the next day, sleep and repeat. Last week though I got a pleasant surprise when I was taken at 7:30 AM to the gym. I was given 45 minutes but accompanied by Ross Kemp’s camera crew. I think the idea was to show the country that they made an effort after the trust in the prison service had been seriously damaged by the sight of me walking out of HMP Onley. The mad thing is I thought I looked sound when I was getting released from Onley, I thought I was mentally fine as well. The negative impact of solitary confinement only hit me when I was released.

    The governor and nurse in Belmarsh come and check on me daily here. They ask how I am; I say fine but tell them that I’ll be able to let them know properly when I walk out of here having spent an additional 2 ½ months on solitary confinement and complete isolation.

    If I walk out of here skinny, it’s not because I’ve been starved. I can eat fine here; the staff make sure of that. I’m just smashing the cell workouts until I can’t do any more. There is not much else to do, it’s hot in here and the days are long.

    I hear the Daily Star have deleted their fake news story about an OAP beating me ha ha. The Governor and Ross Kemp both came into my cell with the newspaper. I said to them that I wouldn’t mind but I’ve not seen a single person since the last time Ross saw me upon my arrival. The fake news is shocking, my kids were sent the article and were panicking thinking that dad had been attacked when there was zero truth in the story!

    My first appointment with my legal team was cancelled due to an incident in the prison, so it took two weeks before I could sit down with my lawyers. I’ve been having an inner struggle with the appeal. I see a few people have written to me telling me that Avi had heard from my wife and that I was feeling down. It’s because my appeal costs are £84,000!, Plus I’ve just paid £20,000 legal fees for the upcoming court proceedings against the Muslim lawyer who sent that red-haired crackhead to live stream my wife and children, putting their lives in danger.

    I don’t know if you’ve heard but I also have to pay their costs from the Old Bailey at £31,000! So not only do they make me go to prison for something I haven’t done but they then make me pay for it, totally insane? That’s like £130,000, it’s f*cking nuts!

    They are trying to make it financially impossible to challenge them. I hope you agree with me in believing that this has to be challenged. My family don’t agree which is why I’ve been having an inner struggle over the issue. I had my legal meeting last week and instructed them to go full steam ahead on an appeal against the conviction and also a bail application. I had to pay them £42,000, they required 50% upfront to start with and the rest when we get the appeal/bail application launched.

    My next phone call home was to tell my wife. I said that I felt so much better now. All I know what to do is fight what they throw at me. I felt that by not appealing I was giving in to something that is quite clearly a stitch-up.

    The lead judge on the Queen’s bench has dirty hands on this case, she lied about me encouraging vigilante attacks and it’s simply not in the video. Will the Supreme Court judge be willing to dirty their hands on my case? Or will my name be cleared!

    It would be impossible to fight the establishment without your help and love. My wife’s view is that it’ll be another trial more stress and kissing the kid’s goodbye again, but for me, another trial is another chance to expose their lies. I have to fight it! I just hope you’ll see it is important as I do as it’s a crazy amount of legal costs. Without your help and support, I’m sure I’d already be a broken man, but instead, I’m pumped and ready for round three. The establishment relies on the fact that they don’t think we’ll be able to afford to keep in the fight, so I will ask you to share this everywhere. I’m asking once again, help me fight the establishment! It’s death, prison or glory.

    Once the appeal papers are in, I’ll have an immediate bail application. Usually takes about seven days so I could or SHOULD be home earlier than we expected meaning I might get a few weeks with the kids in their summer holidays. It was so good to see my wife, kids and family. Can you believe I’m being held in a cat a prison on a total isolation unit for contempt of f*cking court!

    Luton’s first game of the season on Friday night and although I’m locked up, I’m still excited. Just wish I was there with the kids. My son has handled it a bit better than last time, I was able to talk to them all before I went. That morning of court was so difficult; I was so emotional kissing them all goodbye. I knew they would jail me, to be honest, I thought I’d be sitting in solitary for over a year. It’s lucky I’m good company because otherwise all this time alone would drive me mad.

    I’m writing my next book, bringing enemy of the stay up-to-date. I done half of it before I come away, first Love to you all

    By the way, I’ll need a bus to help me with the amount of mail I’m receiving ha ha ha

    PS I’ll probably remember loads I forgot to put in, the main point was that we are appealing! Paperwork should be in next week, then we will have a bail application. Prior thank you to everyone who supports this fight, the struggle continues!

    I’ll end this on a nod to my amazing and beautiful wife, three perfect children, my mum dad and family. I love and miss each and every one of you.

    Thing I need to finalise when I’m released. I want everyone to know every detail of everything that happened. The ups and downs, I want to thank each and every one of you who support me. I don’t really get a chance to get too down because your support continually lifts me up. I just want to get working on dedicating my months to filming #TheRapeOfBritain."


    Tommy Robonson: A Letter from Jail "Well, here we are, it’s 5:30 PM, I wanted to wait until I had some updates before I put pen to paper. I’m receiving your emails and letters and for that I’m grateful. I enjoy the updates and I also take satisfaction from the variety of people who write to me. This unjust prison sentence has had the opposite effect. It awakens more people to the corruption of the establishment. I have had letters from doctors, school teachers, professors, nurses etc. All of whom are shocked at the treatment and unjust conviction that I have received. The first person I saw upon arrival to HMP Belmarsh was Ross Kemp, who is doing a documentary on Belmarsh prison. I’ve been held in total isolation since the moment I entered Belmarsh. I’ve not seen another inmate; I’m held in prison within a prison. I believe the unit that I’m held on was built for IAN HUNTLEY! Other prisoners that have been held here are Abu Hamza and Michael Adebalago! The staff at Belmarsh have been great, the governor has made sure all of my rights are recognised, to be honest, he’s making the best of a difficult situation having me as a prisoner. I am 100% safe; this is a totally different sentence to my last in HMP Onley. Upon entry to Belmarsh, I didn’t ask to be isolated, the prison decided to isolate me. When Ross Kemp was interviewing me, I explained to him that I was being held like this for my own safety, but months of total isolation is proven to have a negative impact on someone’s mental-health. You know in an era when everyone from Prince Harry to leading politicians proclaims to care about mental-health, I do struggle to get my head around the fact that my own government see it in the public interest to lock me up for nearly 5 months on solitary confinement in the past year. All this for asking a now-convicted child rapist how he felt about his verdict! Let me quote you WORD FOR WORD what the Judge at the head of the Queen’s bench division said during her summing up. Let me just point out first that she was promoted to this position just two weeks before my trial! “the contempt’s we have found proved were NOT ones of deliberate defiance, there was NO intention to interfere with the administration of justice and in the event neither the Akhtar trial or the trial that followed were prejudiced.” What she is saying right there is that she convicted a journalist of making a mistake that had ZERO impact on the trial. Even my enemies can see that serving five months on solitary confinement for what she describes as not deliberate is simply not fair. I contest that I even broke any law, it’s simple for those watching the video that the punishment does not fit the crime sorry, my so-called ‘mistake’. I’ve not actually been convicted of a crime, it’s a civil offence! The judges who sentenced me went against the law, they judged AGAINST what the law says on their own website! Before I get into talking about my appeal let me tell you about the suite I’m being held on, they call it a suite ha. It’s a separate part of the prison with no other prisoners. It’s located underneath healthcare; I look out of my window onto my exercise yard. It’s an exercise yard used only by me; it’s 7 m x 5 m, with four surrounding walls that go up four floors high. It’s a bit like a courtyard within the prison and the windows that look in on it are officers’ windows. Only two cell windows look down from healthcare. The idea of this unit is that you never leave it and that no one sees you. I have my cell and then a cell next door which just has an exercise bike in. Then another room next door to that with a shower/bath. My cell door opens at 9 AM when I can then use the bike and shower, make a phone call or spend 30 minutes in the exercise yard. I spend an hour every morning first killing myself on the exercise bike. When I first saw it, I asked the governor “what the f*ck is that”. Now I love it, ha ha. After an hour on the bike, I have a shower, 30-minute walk in the exercise yard and then make a phone call. Then I’m banged up again until 9 AM the next day, sleep and repeat. Last week though I got a pleasant surprise when I was taken at 7:30 AM to the gym. I was given 45 minutes but accompanied by Ross Kemp’s camera crew. I think the idea was to show the country that they made an effort after the trust in the prison service had been seriously damaged by the sight of me walking out of HMP Onley. The mad thing is I thought I looked sound when I was getting released from Onley, I thought I was mentally fine as well. The negative impact of solitary confinement only hit me when I was released. The governor and nurse in Belmarsh come and check on me daily here. They ask how I am; I say fine but tell them that I’ll be able to let them know properly when I walk out of here having spent an additional 2 ½ months on solitary confinement and complete isolation. If I walk out of here skinny, it’s not because I’ve been starved. I can eat fine here; the staff make sure of that. I’m just smashing the cell workouts until I can’t do any more. There is not much else to do, it’s hot in here and the days are long. I hear the Daily Star have deleted their fake news story about an OAP beating me ha ha. The Governor and Ross Kemp both came into my cell with the newspaper. I said to them that I wouldn’t mind but I’ve not seen a single person since the last time Ross saw me upon my arrival. The fake news is shocking, my kids were sent the article and were panicking thinking that dad had been attacked when there was zero truth in the story! My first appointment with my legal team was cancelled due to an incident in the prison, so it took two weeks before I could sit down with my lawyers. I’ve been having an inner struggle with the appeal. I see a few people have written to me telling me that Avi had heard from my wife and that I was feeling down. It’s because my appeal costs are £84,000!, Plus I’ve just paid £20,000 legal fees for the upcoming court proceedings against the Muslim lawyer who sent that red-haired crackhead to live stream my wife and children, putting their lives in danger. I don’t know if you’ve heard but I also have to pay their costs from the Old Bailey at £31,000! So not only do they make me go to prison for something I haven’t done but they then make me pay for it, totally insane? That’s like £130,000, it’s f*cking nuts! They are trying to make it financially impossible to challenge them. I hope you agree with me in believing that this has to be challenged. My family don’t agree which is why I’ve been having an inner struggle over the issue. I had my legal meeting last week and instructed them to go full steam ahead on an appeal against the conviction and also a bail application. I had to pay them £42,000, they required 50% upfront to start with and the rest when we get the appeal/bail application launched. My next phone call home was to tell my wife. I said that I felt so much better now. All I know what to do is fight what they throw at me. I felt that by not appealing I was giving in to something that is quite clearly a stitch-up. The lead judge on the Queen’s bench has dirty hands on this case, she lied about me encouraging vigilante attacks and it’s simply not in the video. Will the Supreme Court judge be willing to dirty their hands on my case? Or will my name be cleared! It would be impossible to fight the establishment without your help and love. My wife’s view is that it’ll be another trial more stress and kissing the kid’s goodbye again, but for me, another trial is another chance to expose their lies. I have to fight it! I just hope you’ll see it is important as I do as it’s a crazy amount of legal costs. Without your help and support, I’m sure I’d already be a broken man, but instead, I’m pumped and ready for round three. The establishment relies on the fact that they don’t think we’ll be able to afford to keep in the fight, so I will ask you to share this everywhere. I’m asking once again, help me fight the establishment! It’s death, prison or glory. Once the appeal papers are in, I’ll have an immediate bail application. Usually takes about seven days so I could or SHOULD be home earlier than we expected meaning I might get a few weeks with the kids in their summer holidays. It was so good to see my wife, kids and family. Can you believe I’m being held in a cat a prison on a total isolation unit for contempt of f*cking court! Luton’s first game of the season on Friday night and although I’m locked up, I’m still excited. Just wish I was there with the kids. My son has handled it a bit better than last time, I was able to talk to them all before I went. That morning of court was so difficult; I was so emotional kissing them all goodbye. I knew they would jail me, to be honest, I thought I’d be sitting in solitary for over a year. It’s lucky I’m good company because otherwise all this time alone would drive me mad. I’m writing my next book, bringing enemy of the stay up-to-date. I done half of it before I come away, first Love to you all By the way, I’ll need a bus to help me with the amount of mail I’m receiving ha ha ha PS I’ll probably remember loads I forgot to put in, the main point was that we are appealing! Paperwork should be in next week, then we will have a bail application. Prior thank you to everyone who supports this fight, the struggle continues! I’ll end this on a nod to my amazing and beautiful wife, three perfect children, my mum dad and family. I love and miss each and every one of you. Thing I need to finalise when I’m released. I want everyone to know every detail of everything that happened. The ups and downs, I want to thank each and every one of you who support me. I don’t really get a chance to get too down because your support continually lifts me up. I just want to get working on dedicating my months to filming #TheRapeOfBritain."
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