• Homewreckers: How Wall Street, Banks & Trump’s Inner Circle Used the 2008 Housing Crash to Get Rich
    We speak with investigative reporter Aaron Glantz about his new book “Homewreckers,” which looks at the devastating legacy of the foreclosure crisis and how much of the so-called recovery is a result of large private equity firms buying up hundreds of thousands of foreclosed homes.

    “Homewreckers: How a Gang of Wall Street Kingpins, Hedge Fund Magnates, Crooked Banks, and Vulture Capitalists Suckered Millions Out of Their Homes and Demolished the American Dream” reveals how the 2008 housing crash decimated millions of Americans’ family wealth but enriched President Donald Trump’s inner circle, including Trump Cabinet members Steven Mnuchin and Wilbur Ross, Trump’s longtime friend and confidant Tom Barrack, and billionaire Republican donor Stephen Schwarzman.

    Glantz writes, “Now, ensconced in power following Trump’s election, these capitalists are creating new financial products that threaten to make the wealth transfers of the [housing] bust permanent.”
    #DemocracyNow #AmyGoodman #ForeclosureCrisis #BanksterAntics
    https://youtu.be/OckBIl9N3TQ
    Democracy Now! 10/15/19
    Homewreckers: How Wall Street, Banks & Trump’s Inner Circle Used the 2008 Housing Crash to Get Rich We speak with investigative reporter Aaron Glantz about his new book “Homewreckers,” which looks at the devastating legacy of the foreclosure crisis and how much of the so-called recovery is a result of large private equity firms buying up hundreds of thousands of foreclosed homes. “Homewreckers: How a Gang of Wall Street Kingpins, Hedge Fund Magnates, Crooked Banks, and Vulture Capitalists Suckered Millions Out of Their Homes and Demolished the American Dream” reveals how the 2008 housing crash decimated millions of Americans’ family wealth but enriched President Donald Trump’s inner circle, including Trump Cabinet members Steven Mnuchin and Wilbur Ross, Trump’s longtime friend and confidant Tom Barrack, and billionaire Republican donor Stephen Schwarzman. Glantz writes, “Now, ensconced in power following Trump’s election, these capitalists are creating new financial products that threaten to make the wealth transfers of the [housing] bust permanent.” #DemocracyNow #AmyGoodman #ForeclosureCrisis #BanksterAntics https://youtu.be/OckBIl9N3TQ Democracy Now! 10/15/19
    Homewreckers: How Wall Street, Banks & Trump’s Inner Circle Used the 2008 Housing Crash to Get Rich
    We speak with investigative reporter Aaron Glantz about his new book “Homewreckers,” which looks at the devastating legacy of the foreclosure crisis and how ...
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  • Zelensky excludes option of military force to recover Donbass and Crimea for Ukraine @FortRussNews https://www.fort-russ.com/2019/10/zelensky-excludes-option-of-military-force-to-recover-donbass-and-crimea-for-ukraine/
    Zelensky excludes option of military force to recover Donbass and Crimea for Ukraine @FortRussNews https://www.fort-russ.com/2019/10/zelensky-excludes-option-of-military-force-to-recover-donbass-and-crimea-for-ukraine/
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  • Sleep
    This is what Catherine had to say...
    Hi Everyone I received my sleep magnesium creme yesterday. Used it last night and oh boy I am amazed with it. I put it on as instructed and I went numb lol and I slept up to 4am got up and then went back to sleep and didn't wake up until 6.30am when the alarm went off. Today I feeling great because I had a good night's sleep for a changed. Web link in comments box
    #sleeping #rest #recovery #wellness
    Sleep This is what Catherine had to say... Hi Everyone I received my sleep magnesium creme yesterday. Used it last night and oh boy I am amazed with it. I put it on as instructed and I went numb lol and I slept up to 4am got up and then went back to sleep and didn't wake up until 6.30am when the alarm went off. Today I feeling great because I had a good night's sleep for a changed. Web link in comments box #sleeping #rest #recovery #wellness
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  • Oil Prices Plunge After Saudi Recovery
    Saudi Arabia’s oil production is returning to normal far more quickly than expected following the allegedly Iranian oil field attack.

    RT America’s Sara Montes de Oca joins Scottie Nell Hughes to discuss the news and what it means for global oil prices.

    Then Ned Ryun, CEO of American Majority, joins to discuss the US diplomatic response.

    He argues that “the Iranian mullahs only understand one language, the language of pain.”
    #QuestionMore #RTAmerica #TiredIranNarrative #OilPriceManipulation
    https://youtu.be/IiA4mmIpOfk
    RT America [Not Owned By American Oligarchs] 9/17/19
    Oil Prices Plunge After Saudi Recovery Saudi Arabia’s oil production is returning to normal far more quickly than expected following the allegedly Iranian oil field attack. RT America’s Sara Montes de Oca joins Scottie Nell Hughes to discuss the news and what it means for global oil prices. Then Ned Ryun, CEO of American Majority, joins to discuss the US diplomatic response. He argues that “the Iranian mullahs only understand one language, the language of pain.” #QuestionMore #RTAmerica #TiredIranNarrative #OilPriceManipulation https://youtu.be/IiA4mmIpOfk RT America [Not Owned By American Oligarchs] 9/17/19
    Oil prices plunge after Saudi recovery
    Saudi Arabia’s oil production is returning to normal far more quickly than expected following the allegedly Iranian oil field attack. RT America’s Sara Monte...
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  • Urgently Investing $1.8 Trillion to #AdaptOurWorld and Avert 'Climate Apartheid' Could Yield $7.1 Trillion in Benefits, Analysis Shows
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/09/10/urgently-investing-18-trillion-adaptourworld-and-avert-climate-apartheid-could-yield
    Jessica Corbett, staff writer

    Warning that the world is at risk of experiencing a "climate apartheid," a report released Tuesday by the Global Commission on Adaptation found that spending $1.8 trillion globally over a decade on adaptation could yield $7.1 trillion in net benefits.

    The commission's report, Adapt Now: A Global Call for Leadership on Climate Resilience (pdf), outlines the human, environmental, and economic imperatives of investing in adaptation to the human-caused climate crisis. The report highlights the "triple dividend" of urgent, coordinated action: it would avoid future losses, generate positive economic gains, and deliver additional social and environmental benefits.

    The proposed $1.7 trillion investment in climate adaptation and resulting $7.1 trillion in benefits are based on significant spending in five key areas—early warning systems, climate-resilient infrastructure, improved dryland agriculture, mangrove protection, and making water resources more resilient—between 2020 and 2030. The systemic transformations called for in the report particularly aim to address global inequalities that are increasingly exacerbated by the climate emergency.

    UN Climate Change ✔ @UNFCCC
    The #AdaptOurWorld report released today shows:
    Investing $1.8 trillion in climate adaptation could generate $7.1 tn in benefits.

    Leaders around the 🌍 are calling on governments & businesses to urgently act on climate adaptation.
    Report 👉🏼 http://bit.ly/2lII1mp
    View image on Twitter
    5:23 AM - Sep 10, 2019

    The commission that produced the new analysis is chaired by former United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates, and World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva. The trio wrote in the report's forward that, in terms of adaptation, "so far the response has been gravely insufficient. Meanwhile, the climate crisis is here, now: wildfires ravage fragile habitats, city taps run dry, droughts scorch the land, and floods destroy people's homes and livelihoods."

    Investing in adaptation "is a moral imperative," Patrick Verkooijen, chief executive of the Global Center on Adaptation, which co-manages the commission with the World Resources Institute, told The Washington Post.

    "Even if we were to live in 1.5 degree world we would need massive adaptation," said Verkooijen, referring to the Paris climate accord goal of limiting average global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. "Investing in adaptation is not a tradeoff with mitigation. We need to do both."

    Absent global adaptation efforts, the report estimates that by 2050, declines in agricultural yields would most seriously impact the world's 500 million small farms, the number of people lacking sufficient water could soar beyond five billion, and rising seas and devastating storms could force hundreds of millions people from their homes—costing coastal urban areas over $1 trillion per year.

    Though the climate crisis is one of the greatest threats humanity faces and it impacts all sectors of society, as the report put it, "people who did the least to cause the problem—especially those living in poverty and fragile areas—are most at risk."

    "We risk a climate apartheid where the wealthy pay to escape, while the rest of the world is left to suffer," Verkooijen warned. "Without bold adaptation action, climate change becomes a life sentence to poverty and suffering for already vulnerable and marginalized people."

    The report comes as the Bahamas is in the beginning stages of what is expected to be a drawn out recovery process after being devastated by Hurricane Dorian, which made landfall on the islands as a Category 5 storm early this month. In what one critic decried as "eco-apartheid," hundreds of Bahamian refugees who lacked a U.S. visa were ordered off a ferry headed for Ft. Lauderdale, Florida this weekend.

    The destruction in the Bahamas spotlighted climate scientists' warnings about the connection between extreme weather—including hurricanes, heatwaves, and fires—and rising temperatures from human activities that produce greenhouse gas emissions. When it comes to hurricanes, for example, experts warn that research suggests the warming world will see an increase in intense storms.

    "We tend not to invest in resilience and climate adaptation efforts until after a disaster has happened, until a lot of the damage has been done," Rob Moore, a policy analyst at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), told InsideClimate News—which graphed the costs and benefits of the new report's recommendations.

    How adaptation efforts can pay off

    Outlining major barriers to global adaptation efforts, the report says that "in addition to knowledge gaps and short-term biases, fragmented responsibilities, poor institutional cooperation, and lack of resources hinder action. Governments lack incentives and funding for agencies to grapple with knowledge gaps, collaborate across silos, and implement innovative solutions."

    NRDC's Moore noted that "these types of investments are things that pay off over the long term, not over a single election cycle."

    Ban, who served as the U.N. chief from January 2007 to December 2016, emphasized the importance of global collaboration on adaptation efforts in a statement Tuesday.

    "Climate change doesn't respect borders: it's an international problem that can only be solved with co-operation and collaboration, across borders and worldwide," he said. "It is becoming increasingly clear that in many parts of the world, our climate has already changed, and we need to adapt with it."

    "Mitigation and adaptation go hand-in-hand as two equally important building blocks of the Paris Climate Change Agreement," Ban continued. "Adaptation is not only the right thing to do, it is also the smart thing to do to boost economic growth and create a climate resilient world."

    Along with events across the globe Tuesday to launch the report, contributors and supporters shared its findings and suggestions on social media with the hashtag #AdaptOurWorld.


    World Resources Inst ✔ @WorldResources
    Today, we call on leaders around the globe to #AdaptOurWorld. #Climate impacts are here now, and adaptation is critical to creating stronger, safer, thriving communities. Join us in calling others to act with unprecedented courage, resources & commitment! http://ow.ly/iKDA50w4lJt

    View image on Twitter
    10:12 AM - Sep 10, 2019

    The commission has produced a series of videos about adaptation efforts around the world—from Costa Rica and India to the Netherlands and New York City—which were shared on social media with the hashtag Tuesday:
    Urgently Investing $1.8 Trillion to #AdaptOurWorld and Avert 'Climate Apartheid' Could Yield $7.1 Trillion in Benefits, Analysis Shows https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/09/10/urgently-investing-18-trillion-adaptourworld-and-avert-climate-apartheid-could-yield Jessica Corbett, staff writer Warning that the world is at risk of experiencing a "climate apartheid," a report released Tuesday by the Global Commission on Adaptation found that spending $1.8 trillion globally over a decade on adaptation could yield $7.1 trillion in net benefits. The commission's report, Adapt Now: A Global Call for Leadership on Climate Resilience (pdf), outlines the human, environmental, and economic imperatives of investing in adaptation to the human-caused climate crisis. The report highlights the "triple dividend" of urgent, coordinated action: it would avoid future losses, generate positive economic gains, and deliver additional social and environmental benefits. The proposed $1.7 trillion investment in climate adaptation and resulting $7.1 trillion in benefits are based on significant spending in five key areas—early warning systems, climate-resilient infrastructure, improved dryland agriculture, mangrove protection, and making water resources more resilient—between 2020 and 2030. The systemic transformations called for in the report particularly aim to address global inequalities that are increasingly exacerbated by the climate emergency. UN Climate Change ✔ @UNFCCC The #AdaptOurWorld report released today shows: Investing $1.8 trillion in climate adaptation could generate $7.1 tn in benefits. Leaders around the 🌍 are calling on governments & businesses to urgently act on climate adaptation. Report 👉🏼 http://bit.ly/2lII1mp View image on Twitter 5:23 AM - Sep 10, 2019 The commission that produced the new analysis is chaired by former United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates, and World Bank CEO Kristalina Georgieva. The trio wrote in the report's forward that, in terms of adaptation, "so far the response has been gravely insufficient. Meanwhile, the climate crisis is here, now: wildfires ravage fragile habitats, city taps run dry, droughts scorch the land, and floods destroy people's homes and livelihoods." Investing in adaptation "is a moral imperative," Patrick Verkooijen, chief executive of the Global Center on Adaptation, which co-manages the commission with the World Resources Institute, told The Washington Post. "Even if we were to live in 1.5 degree world we would need massive adaptation," said Verkooijen, referring to the Paris climate accord goal of limiting average global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels. "Investing in adaptation is not a tradeoff with mitigation. We need to do both." Absent global adaptation efforts, the report estimates that by 2050, declines in agricultural yields would most seriously impact the world's 500 million small farms, the number of people lacking sufficient water could soar beyond five billion, and rising seas and devastating storms could force hundreds of millions people from their homes—costing coastal urban areas over $1 trillion per year. Though the climate crisis is one of the greatest threats humanity faces and it impacts all sectors of society, as the report put it, "people who did the least to cause the problem—especially those living in poverty and fragile areas—are most at risk." "We risk a climate apartheid where the wealthy pay to escape, while the rest of the world is left to suffer," Verkooijen warned. "Without bold adaptation action, climate change becomes a life sentence to poverty and suffering for already vulnerable and marginalized people." The report comes as the Bahamas is in the beginning stages of what is expected to be a drawn out recovery process after being devastated by Hurricane Dorian, which made landfall on the islands as a Category 5 storm early this month. In what one critic decried as "eco-apartheid," hundreds of Bahamian refugees who lacked a U.S. visa were ordered off a ferry headed for Ft. Lauderdale, Florida this weekend. The destruction in the Bahamas spotlighted climate scientists' warnings about the connection between extreme weather—including hurricanes, heatwaves, and fires—and rising temperatures from human activities that produce greenhouse gas emissions. When it comes to hurricanes, for example, experts warn that research suggests the warming world will see an increase in intense storms. "We tend not to invest in resilience and climate adaptation efforts until after a disaster has happened, until a lot of the damage has been done," Rob Moore, a policy analyst at the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), told InsideClimate News—which graphed the costs and benefits of the new report's recommendations. How adaptation efforts can pay off Outlining major barriers to global adaptation efforts, the report says that "in addition to knowledge gaps and short-term biases, fragmented responsibilities, poor institutional cooperation, and lack of resources hinder action. Governments lack incentives and funding for agencies to grapple with knowledge gaps, collaborate across silos, and implement innovative solutions." NRDC's Moore noted that "these types of investments are things that pay off over the long term, not over a single election cycle." Ban, who served as the U.N. chief from January 2007 to December 2016, emphasized the importance of global collaboration on adaptation efforts in a statement Tuesday. "Climate change doesn't respect borders: it's an international problem that can only be solved with co-operation and collaboration, across borders and worldwide," he said. "It is becoming increasingly clear that in many parts of the world, our climate has already changed, and we need to adapt with it." "Mitigation and adaptation go hand-in-hand as two equally important building blocks of the Paris Climate Change Agreement," Ban continued. "Adaptation is not only the right thing to do, it is also the smart thing to do to boost economic growth and create a climate resilient world." Along with events across the globe Tuesday to launch the report, contributors and supporters shared its findings and suggestions on social media with the hashtag #AdaptOurWorld. World Resources Inst ✔ @WorldResources Today, we call on leaders around the globe to #AdaptOurWorld. #Climate impacts are here now, and adaptation is critical to creating stronger, safer, thriving communities. Join us in calling others to act with unprecedented courage, resources & commitment! http://ow.ly/iKDA50w4lJt View image on Twitter 10:12 AM - Sep 10, 2019 The commission has produced a series of videos about adaptation efforts around the world—from Costa Rica and India to the Netherlands and New York City—which were shared on social media with the hashtag Tuesday:
    Urgently Investing $1.8 Trillion to #AdaptOurWorld and Avert 'Climate Apartheid' Could Yield $7.1 Trillion in Benefits, Analysis Shows
    "Without bold adaptation action, climate change becomes a life sentence to poverty and suffering for already vulnerable and marginalized people."
    WWW.COMMONDREAMS.ORG
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  • MSN News
    So you a$$hole Demon-Rats wants to waste more time while American citizens are losing their homes, and some their very lives! You Demon-Rats don't care about Americans!

    2019 Fire Season Outlook
    California experienced the deadliest and most destructive wildfires in its history in 2017 and 2018. Fueled by drought, an unprecedented buildup of dry vegetation and extreme winds, the size and intensity of these wildfires caused the loss of more than 100 lives, destroyed thousands of homes and exposed millions of urban and rural Californians to unhealthy air. While wildfires are a natural part of California’s landscape, the fire season in California and across the West is starting earlier and ending later each year. Climate change is considered a key driver of this trend. Warmer spring and summer temperatures, reduced snowpack, and earlier spring snowmelt create longer and more intense dry seasons that increase moisture stress on vegetation and make forests more susceptible to severe wildfire. The length of fire season is estimated to have increased by 75 days across the Sierras and seems to correspond with an increase in the extent of forest fires across the state.

    Reporting from Ridgecrest, Calif. — The largest earthquake in two decades rattled Southern California on Thursday morning, shaking communities from Las Vegas to Long Beach and ending a quiet period in the state’s seismic history.
    Striking at 10:33 a.m., the magnitude 6.4 temblor was centered about 125 miles northeast of Los Angeles in the remote Searles Valley area near where Inyo, San Bernardino and Kern counties meet. It was felt as far away as Ensenada and Mexicali in Mexico, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Reno and Chico, Calif. A 5.4 magnitude aftershock awoke many Friday morning.

    Hurricane Dorian fast facts
    The Bahamas are recovering after Dorian decimated the islands for 48 hours, killing at least 43 people.
    Nearly 70,000 people are believed to be homeless in the Bahamas.
    The storm is expected to move northeast away from the U.S. through Saturday and become a post-tropical cyclone with hurricane-force winds as it approaches eastern Canada.
    Hurricane-force winds are expected in portions of Nova Scotia by late Saturday.

    The Midwestern United States has been experiencing major floods since mid-March 2019, primarily along the Missouri River and its tributaries in Nebraska, Missouri, South Dakota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Mississippi River has also seen flooding, although starting later and ending earlier. The 2019 January-to-May period was the wettest on record for the U.S., with multiple severe weather outbreaks through May in the Midwest, High Plains, and South exacerbating the flooding and causing additional damage.[1][2][3] Throughout late May and early June, rain in Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri caused every site on the Mississippi River to record a top-five crest.[4] At least three people in Iowa and Nebraska have died.[5]

    More tropical storms are brewing on both sides of the US as Dorian makes its way out
    Madeline Holcombe
    By Madeline Holcombe, CNN

    Updated 12:58 PM ET, Sat September 7, 2019

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/ocasio-cortez-renews-impeachment-call-amid-probe-involving-trump-s-scotland-property/ar-AAGX9xS?ocid=ob-fb-enus-580&fbclid=IwAR0QtaE7zDspZrcK-J-OCGUTl1vP_hLJBx1JXqBYzcRAzY256msIhbMipGk
    MSN News So you a$$hole Demon-Rats wants to waste more time while American citizens are losing their homes, and some their very lives! You Demon-Rats don't care about Americans! 2019 Fire Season Outlook California experienced the deadliest and most destructive wildfires in its history in 2017 and 2018. Fueled by drought, an unprecedented buildup of dry vegetation and extreme winds, the size and intensity of these wildfires caused the loss of more than 100 lives, destroyed thousands of homes and exposed millions of urban and rural Californians to unhealthy air. While wildfires are a natural part of California’s landscape, the fire season in California and across the West is starting earlier and ending later each year. Climate change is considered a key driver of this trend. Warmer spring and summer temperatures, reduced snowpack, and earlier spring snowmelt create longer and more intense dry seasons that increase moisture stress on vegetation and make forests more susceptible to severe wildfire. The length of fire season is estimated to have increased by 75 days across the Sierras and seems to correspond with an increase in the extent of forest fires across the state. Reporting from Ridgecrest, Calif. — The largest earthquake in two decades rattled Southern California on Thursday morning, shaking communities from Las Vegas to Long Beach and ending a quiet period in the state’s seismic history. Striking at 10:33 a.m., the magnitude 6.4 temblor was centered about 125 miles northeast of Los Angeles in the remote Searles Valley area near where Inyo, San Bernardino and Kern counties meet. It was felt as far away as Ensenada and Mexicali in Mexico, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Reno and Chico, Calif. A 5.4 magnitude aftershock awoke many Friday morning. Hurricane Dorian fast facts The Bahamas are recovering after Dorian decimated the islands for 48 hours, killing at least 43 people. Nearly 70,000 people are believed to be homeless in the Bahamas. The storm is expected to move northeast away from the U.S. through Saturday and become a post-tropical cyclone with hurricane-force winds as it approaches eastern Canada. Hurricane-force winds are expected in portions of Nova Scotia by late Saturday. The Midwestern United States has been experiencing major floods since mid-March 2019, primarily along the Missouri River and its tributaries in Nebraska, Missouri, South Dakota, Iowa, and Kansas. The Mississippi River has also seen flooding, although starting later and ending earlier. The 2019 January-to-May period was the wettest on record for the U.S., with multiple severe weather outbreaks through May in the Midwest, High Plains, and South exacerbating the flooding and causing additional damage.[1][2][3] Throughout late May and early June, rain in Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri caused every site on the Mississippi River to record a top-five crest.[4] At least three people in Iowa and Nebraska have died.[5] More tropical storms are brewing on both sides of the US as Dorian makes its way out Madeline Holcombe By Madeline Holcombe, CNN Updated 12:58 PM ET, Sat September 7, 2019 https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/ocasio-cortez-renews-impeachment-call-amid-probe-involving-trump-s-scotland-property/ar-AAGX9xS?ocid=ob-fb-enus-580&fbclid=IwAR0QtaE7zDspZrcK-J-OCGUTl1vP_hLJBx1JXqBYzcRAzY256msIhbMipGk
    Ocasio-Cortez renews impeachment call amid probe involving Trump's Scotland property
    Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (N.Y.) renewed calls to impeach President Trump Friday shortly after reports emerged of a House investigation into a stop a military crew made at his Turnberry resort in Scotland.
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  • How Media Wrongly Portrays Opioid Addiction - 68,000 Dead Last Year.
    For the most part, Nancy B. is just a regular person.

    She’s 29. She lives on Staten Island.
    She has a boyfriend, a child and a job.
    She’s also a former drug user in recovery who has administered naloxone (sold under the brand name Narcan), a medication that reverses opioid overdose, “quite a few times.”

    “It saves lives,” she told Observer.

    “Anything I can do to make sure that’s a known fact, and make it available to everyone, I will do.”

    Nancy isn’t alone in her desire to see naloxone made more prevalent. In New York and other cities across the country, there are programs in place to make sure regular, everyday citizens have access to naloxone.

    Not only could you attend one of the free certification trainings or go to a pharmacy and start carrying the life-saving medication, but a growing number of people, like Nancy and some community organizers and leaders, argue you should.

    Whether you’re close to someone who uses drugs or not, you could administer naloxone, too, and as rates of fatal overdoses rise, you might be closer to someone at risk than you realize.

    In fact, you could be at risk yourself:

    Fentanyl, an opioid 30 to 50 times more powerful than heroin, has been found in cocaine and other non-opioid street drugs in New York City, which means even occasional users who choose club drugs over pills or heroin could still experience an opiate overdose.
    #OpioidsKill #Fentanyl50XWorseThanHeroin #TheDamageReport #JohnIadarola #TYTNetwork #LindseyEllefson
    https://youtu.be/QUWG-16RrB0
    The Damage Report 9/7/19
    How Media Wrongly Portrays Opioid Addiction - 68,000 Dead Last Year. For the most part, Nancy B. is just a regular person. She’s 29. She lives on Staten Island. She has a boyfriend, a child and a job. She’s also a former drug user in recovery who has administered naloxone (sold under the brand name Narcan), a medication that reverses opioid overdose, “quite a few times.” “It saves lives,” she told Observer. “Anything I can do to make sure that’s a known fact, and make it available to everyone, I will do.” Nancy isn’t alone in her desire to see naloxone made more prevalent. In New York and other cities across the country, there are programs in place to make sure regular, everyday citizens have access to naloxone. Not only could you attend one of the free certification trainings or go to a pharmacy and start carrying the life-saving medication, but a growing number of people, like Nancy and some community organizers and leaders, argue you should. Whether you’re close to someone who uses drugs or not, you could administer naloxone, too, and as rates of fatal overdoses rise, you might be closer to someone at risk than you realize. In fact, you could be at risk yourself: Fentanyl, an opioid 30 to 50 times more powerful than heroin, has been found in cocaine and other non-opioid street drugs in New York City, which means even occasional users who choose club drugs over pills or heroin could still experience an opiate overdose. #OpioidsKill #Fentanyl50XWorseThanHeroin #TheDamageReport #JohnIadarola #TYTNetwork #LindseyEllefson https://youtu.be/QUWG-16RrB0 The Damage Report 9/7/19
    How Media Wrongly Portrays Opioid Addiction
    US media wrongly portrays opioid addiction. John Iadarola and Lindsey Ellefson break it down on The Damage Report. Follow The Damage Report on Facebook: http...
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  • Looting and Chaos in the Bahamas: Apocalyptic Hurricane | Prepping Lessons
    As recovery begins in the Grand Bahama reports of looting are widespread and severe. [More Links To Sources At YouTube]
    #DorianBahamas #ApocalypticAftermath #CanadianPrepper #BeingPrepared
    https://youtu.be/WUd1w-5rgrM
    Canadian Prepper 9/6/19
    Looting and Chaos in the Bahamas: Apocalyptic Hurricane | Prepping Lessons As recovery begins in the Grand Bahama reports of looting are widespread and severe. [More Links To Sources At YouTube] #DorianBahamas #ApocalypticAftermath #CanadianPrepper #BeingPrepared https://youtu.be/WUd1w-5rgrM Canadian Prepper 9/6/19
    Looting and Chaos in the Bahamas: Apocalyptic Hurricane | Prepping Lessons
    As recovery begins in the Grand Bahama reports of looting are widespread and severe. Woman recounting looting in Bahamas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4E7z...
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  • FULL SHOW: US Slaps More Tariffs On Chinese Goods
    The escalating US-China trade war is hurting global markets. The United States imposed another round of tariffs on Chinese goods. China retaliated by raising duties on certain US imports.

    Meanwhile, a leaked audio recording appears to show Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam telling business leaders she would resign if she had a choice. Protesters took to the streets this weekend despite a government ban.
    RT America's Michele Greenstein reports from Hong Kong.

    US President Donald Trump's special envoy to Afghanistan said the United States and the Taliban have reached an agreement "in principle" that would withdraw 5,000 US troops within the next five months. Former Pentagon official Michael Maloof weighs in.

    Plus, fire and rescue crews have been recovering bodies from a boat that caught fire this weekend near the Santa Cruz Islands, 32 miles off the California coast.
    #SaraMontesDeOrca #RTAmerica #TrumpTradeWar #InQuestion
    https://youtu.be/-F_Ia_Th6jQ
    RT America 9/3/19
    FULL SHOW: US Slaps More Tariffs On Chinese Goods The escalating US-China trade war is hurting global markets. The United States imposed another round of tariffs on Chinese goods. China retaliated by raising duties on certain US imports. Meanwhile, a leaked audio recording appears to show Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam telling business leaders she would resign if she had a choice. Protesters took to the streets this weekend despite a government ban. RT America's Michele Greenstein reports from Hong Kong. US President Donald Trump's special envoy to Afghanistan said the United States and the Taliban have reached an agreement "in principle" that would withdraw 5,000 US troops within the next five months. Former Pentagon official Michael Maloof weighs in. Plus, fire and rescue crews have been recovering bodies from a boat that caught fire this weekend near the Santa Cruz Islands, 32 miles off the California coast. #SaraMontesDeOrca #RTAmerica #TrumpTradeWar #InQuestion https://youtu.be/-F_Ia_Th6jQ RT America 9/3/19
    FULL SHOW: US slaps more tariffs on Chinese goods
    The escalating US-China trade war is hurting global markets. The United States imposed another round of tariffs on Chinese goods. China retaliated by raising...
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  • Tipping Point: UN Biodiversity Chief Warns Burning of Amazon Could Lead to 'Cascading Collapse of Natural Systems'
    https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/08/30/tipping-point-un-biodiversity-chief-warns-burning-amazon-could-lead-cascading
    Julia Conley, staff writer

    Unless world governments, consumers, and businesses all work together to address the root causes of the current burning of the Amazon rain forest, the Arctic, and forests in the Congo and Angola, the planet will continue careening toward a point of no return, the U.N.'s top biodiversity expert said Friday.

    Cristiana Paşca Palmer, executive secretary of the U.N. Convention on Biological Diversity, called the fires that have torn through more than 1,300 square miles of the Amazon this year "extraordinarily concerning."

    "But it is not just the Amazon," she told The Guardian. "We're also concerned with what's happening in other forests and ecosystems, and with the broader and rapid degradation of nature."

    The Amazon fires themselves are a sign, Paşca Palmer said, that "we are moving towards the tipping points that scientists talk about that could produce cascading collapses of natural systems."

    Green groups have largely blamed Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro for the fires, pointing to his encouragement of what one indigenous leader called "predatory behavior" of loggers, ranchers, and miners who want to clear forests for their industrial use.

    World governments and philanthropists have offered tens of millions of dollars to help save the rain forest, often called the "lungs of the Earth" because of the amount of oxygen its trees produce, but Paşca Palmer emphasized that a paradigm shift is needed in how the world approaches biodiversity and ecosystems.

    "We need to address the root causes," Paşca Palmer said. "Even if the amount involved in extinguishing fires in rainforests was a billion or 500 million dollars, we won't see an improvement unless more profound structural changes are taking place. We need a transformation in the way we consume and produce."

    Helping to protect the world's pollinators by ending the use of harmful pesticides, cutting fossil fuel emissions to net zero by 2030 to avoid a catastrophic warming of the planet by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, and ending habitat destruction through deforestation and other human activities, are all necessary to maintain the Earth's biodiversity, the U.N. panel led by Paşca Palmer says.

    Paşca Palmer pointed to robust biodiversity programs in Costa Rica and Colombia as models for the rest of the world when they meet for an upcoming biodiversity summit in Kunming, China next year.

    Costa Rica's government has offered payments to landowners for preserving forests and planting trees, while Colombia has nearly doubled its federally protected lands in recent years.

    "I hope this will have a snowball effect," said Paşca Palmer. "It's a growing movement. I feel that now the heads of state are embracing this, we have a good signal."

    On social media, Extinction Rebellion Ireland expressed support for Paşca Palmer's message, writing, "If we don't work together, we are going to die together."

    Extinction Rebellion Ireland @ExtinctRebelsIE
    If we don't work together, we are going to die together.

    UN’s top biodiversity body says we are moving towards the tipping points that will produce the collapse of our natural systems.

    Join the rebellion now: http://www.extinctionrebellionireland.com https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/aug/30/amazon-fires-biodiversity-united-nations

    Amazon fires 'extraordinarily concerning', warns UN biodiversity chief
    Biodiversity chief calls for countries to unite to halt rapid degradation of nature

    theguardian.com
    8:04 AM - Aug 30, 2019

    Climate campaigner Tony Juniper called the U.N. official's comments "a timely reminder that nature underpins the human world."

    Tony Juniper ✔ @TonyJuniper
    A timely reminder that Nature underpins the human world & that we are approaching a ‘point of no return’. It is vital to embed ecological recovery at the heart of our economic system, a reality that must be reflected in actual policy & spending decisions https://bit.ly/30M1Qc7

    Amazon fires 'extraordinarily concerning', warns UN biodiversity chief
    Biodiversity chief calls for countries to unite to halt rapid degradation of nature

    theguardian.com
    8:49 AM - Aug 30, 2019 · Cambridge, England

    "It is vital to embed ecological recovery at the heart of our economic system," wrote Juniper, "a reality that must be reflected in actual policy and spending decisions."
    Tipping Point: UN Biodiversity Chief Warns Burning of Amazon Could Lead to 'Cascading Collapse of Natural Systems' https://www.commondreams.org/news/2019/08/30/tipping-point-un-biodiversity-chief-warns-burning-amazon-could-lead-cascading Julia Conley, staff writer Unless world governments, consumers, and businesses all work together to address the root causes of the current burning of the Amazon rain forest, the Arctic, and forests in the Congo and Angola, the planet will continue careening toward a point of no return, the U.N.'s top biodiversity expert said Friday. Cristiana Paşca Palmer, executive secretary of the U.N. Convention on Biological Diversity, called the fires that have torn through more than 1,300 square miles of the Amazon this year "extraordinarily concerning." "But it is not just the Amazon," she told The Guardian. "We're also concerned with what's happening in other forests and ecosystems, and with the broader and rapid degradation of nature." The Amazon fires themselves are a sign, Paşca Palmer said, that "we are moving towards the tipping points that scientists talk about that could produce cascading collapses of natural systems." Green groups have largely blamed Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro for the fires, pointing to his encouragement of what one indigenous leader called "predatory behavior" of loggers, ranchers, and miners who want to clear forests for their industrial use. World governments and philanthropists have offered tens of millions of dollars to help save the rain forest, often called the "lungs of the Earth" because of the amount of oxygen its trees produce, but Paşca Palmer emphasized that a paradigm shift is needed in how the world approaches biodiversity and ecosystems. "We need to address the root causes," Paşca Palmer said. "Even if the amount involved in extinguishing fires in rainforests was a billion or 500 million dollars, we won't see an improvement unless more profound structural changes are taking place. We need a transformation in the way we consume and produce." Helping to protect the world's pollinators by ending the use of harmful pesticides, cutting fossil fuel emissions to net zero by 2030 to avoid a catastrophic warming of the planet by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels, and ending habitat destruction through deforestation and other human activities, are all necessary to maintain the Earth's biodiversity, the U.N. panel led by Paşca Palmer says. Paşca Palmer pointed to robust biodiversity programs in Costa Rica and Colombia as models for the rest of the world when they meet for an upcoming biodiversity summit in Kunming, China next year. Costa Rica's government has offered payments to landowners for preserving forests and planting trees, while Colombia has nearly doubled its federally protected lands in recent years. "I hope this will have a snowball effect," said Paşca Palmer. "It's a growing movement. I feel that now the heads of state are embracing this, we have a good signal." On social media, Extinction Rebellion Ireland expressed support for Paşca Palmer's message, writing, "If we don't work together, we are going to die together." Extinction Rebellion Ireland @ExtinctRebelsIE If we don't work together, we are going to die together. UN’s top biodiversity body says we are moving towards the tipping points that will produce the collapse of our natural systems. Join the rebellion now: http://www.extinctionrebellionireland.com https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/aug/30/amazon-fires-biodiversity-united-nations … Amazon fires 'extraordinarily concerning', warns UN biodiversity chief Biodiversity chief calls for countries to unite to halt rapid degradation of nature theguardian.com 8:04 AM - Aug 30, 2019 Climate campaigner Tony Juniper called the U.N. official's comments "a timely reminder that nature underpins the human world." Tony Juniper ✔ @TonyJuniper A timely reminder that Nature underpins the human world & that we are approaching a ‘point of no return’. It is vital to embed ecological recovery at the heart of our economic system, a reality that must be reflected in actual policy & spending decisions https://bit.ly/30M1Qc7 Amazon fires 'extraordinarily concerning', warns UN biodiversity chief Biodiversity chief calls for countries to unite to halt rapid degradation of nature theguardian.com 8:49 AM - Aug 30, 2019 · Cambridge, England "It is vital to embed ecological recovery at the heart of our economic system," wrote Juniper, "a reality that must be reflected in actual policy and spending decisions."
    Tipping Point: UN Biodiversity Chief Warns Burning of Amazon Could Lead to 'Cascading Collapse of Natural Systems'
    "If we don't work together, we are going to die together."
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